Question Layering under semi-dry - does it help?

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benderVIE

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Hi! I am mostly a warm water diver, and have only recently started to put together my own equipment. For a trip to the Mediterranean I invested in a Camaro XTreme, a 7mm semi-dry suit with integrated socks and hood. For 12°C in 30-40 meters, this was perfectly adequate.

Now I want to start exploring the Austrian lakes, and not just in ideal conditions. Meaning: 4-11°C. The obvious choice would be a dry suit, but I wonder if I can make do with the semi-dry; and if it makes sense to put on layers underneath (think underlings or just plain ski underwear) to keep me warm. My question is: does that even make sense, considering some water ingress will be unavoidable? And does it help at all?

Thanks for your advice!
Ben
 

Rol diy

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It will help with a shorty under ,
but you will need more lead,
Wool clothing was used in the old day, it has some insulation underwater..
I wouldn't use normal clothes

I have ice dived in 7mm 2 piece, in the water not to bad,, it more surface temps that -10 no sun is a pain, if its sunny its alot nicer
 

wnissen

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Willkommen! I have wondered the same thing. There's definitely water sloshing around in there to a certain extent, it stands to reason that a base layer (underwear) or thin fleece would at least keep the warmer water closer to your skin, but I have never tried it. Typically I think people use a neoprene hooded vest or an electrically heated vest for additional warmth, though.
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/perdix-ai/

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