How warm is a Dry Suit ?

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admikar

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Not really sure why your instructor asked you to not have dry gloves. They add absolutely nothing to the way you dive. If anything, you can direct some air to them to act as a lever if you are head heavy.
 
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Roy_W

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He preferred that we dive with a maximum of the usual material in order that we concentrate solely on the exercise at hand. To the stage that we even took our lights and compasses even though we knew we wouldn't use them.
 

Sebs

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Not really, but the lake of Zürich is as cold as the Lac Leman :cool:

concerning the dive time, these kind of dives are pretty normal in a dry suit:
View attachment 746428
Not to derail this thread but I'm also in Zürich and will be doing my dry suit course in 2 weeks before ordering a seaskin Nova. What is your opinion on ticking the box for thick undergarments? The plan is to use the suit here in Switzerland but also for waters closer to the 20degC range.
 

bdatud4x4

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I dove for many years with a titanium lined 7mm wetsuit I was always warm once the water got in the suit and my body warmed it up. 2yrs ago I bought a (DUI)drysuit with heavy undergarment and socks, Will never go back to a wet suit in cold water. That said the undergarments will add extra to dive weights,
so keep that in mind. I have dove Lake Tahoe in February 29deg(F) at 80' and was not cold, I have also dove in 50deg water and was just a little cold wearing just sweats
 

Joebar

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Not to derail this thread but I'm also in Zürich and will be doing my dry suit course in 2 weeks before ordering a seaskin Nova. What is your opinion on ticking the box for thick undergarments? The plan is to use the suit here in Switzerland but also for waters closer to the 20degC range.
If we are talking from dive times up to an hour I wouldnt use the thick undergarment. There are good normal underwear on the market like the SF Tech underwaer or 4Elements. i dont like the underwear from Seaskin.

Important is to be well organized on the dive site, e.g. preparing everything for the dive before you put the suit on to prevent from sweating. Setting up tanks and so on.
 

Wibble

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Not to derail this thread but I'm also in Zürich and will be doing my dry suit course in 2 weeks before ordering a seaskin Nova. What is your opinion on ticking the box for thick undergarments? The plan is to use the suit here in Switzerland but also for waters closer to the 20degC range.
Different types of undersuits.

For cold you need lots of layers or a dedicated warm one-piece plus underclothes. These care often the "anorak" thermals such as a Weazel, or the more expensive 4th Element or Santi undersuits. Some have heating elements! I've used 4th Element Arctic Expedition for years down to 5 degrees.

For warmer waters, lighter layers such as the 4th element Arctics or even rash vests when it's really warm.
 

Sebs

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Different types of undersuits.

For cold you need lots of layers or a dedicated warm one-piece plus underclothes. These care often the "anorak" thermals such as a Weazel, or the more expensive 4th Element or Santi undersuits. Some have heating elements! I've used 4th Element Arctic Expedition for years down to 5 degrees.

For warmer waters, lighter layers such as the 4th element Arctics or even rash vests when it's really warm.
Thanks but not what I was asking. Seaskin has an option you can tick where they add a couple of cm to the measurements to accommodate for thick undergarments (and only recommend this option if you frequently dive in cold water). I was wondering if this was needed for diving in Switzerland or if I could make do without.
 

broncobowsher

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Not Seaskin, but Ursuit.
I did measurements and photos both ways. They have the take a photo and the get measurements off that. Did that, both as directed and while dressed as well as all the measurements both ways. It came the right size. Of course some of the numbers didn't change (height, inseam, etc) and some did (any padded diameter).

It came fitting perfect.
 

bletso

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I have done over an hour under the ice a few times. With dry gloves the worst part is the initial facial immersion and then once the face numbs up you don't want to have to replace the mouthpiece. I had to use my hands to help close my mouth about the mouthpiece. I like the shell suit in flexibility for undergarments. Nothing high tech except C200 thinsulate and just layers. Argon in my opinion helps some. A rebreather and breathing warm moist air, even He mixes, really helps staying warm.

A lot of info on what suit or type of suit is best is IMO just sales hype. Don't get me wrong as the type of diving one does such as wreck or cave you will want a heavier suit material.

My favorite suit for cave diving was a Poseidon Unisuit, but deep and cold water a shell suit was better. Keep in mind that a neoprene dry suit will lose a lot of its thermal protection the deeper you go. So crushed neoprene offers a tough material, some thermal protection which won't lessen with depth and the ability to use undergarments.

On thing pretty much guaranteed is once you go dry you won't go back to a 6mm suit. I have two suits; a 3mm and hooded vest and if too cold for that I am dry. 70°F water I am dry and colder than about 60°F. the hands are dry as well.

DIving where I live means the fully 3/4 of all my lifetime dives have been dry.
 
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Roy_W

Roy_W

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Thanks but not what I was asking. Seaskin has an option you can tick where they add a couple of cm to the measurements to accommodate for thick undergarments (and only recommend this option if you frequently dive in cold water). I was wondering if this was needed for diving in Switzerland or if I could make do without.

Personally I would select the option as you will always have to wear something under your suit, even just jogging pants. And if your decide that you need the thermal gear at least you can use it.. It wont add a huge difference to the suit size..
I was surprised that I was not warmer in the Lac Leman with the SF Tech undergarments and they are rated to be the equivalant of Insulate 300.. Next week I will be wearing the same gear but with a better first layer.. I will be using an Odlo 1st layer that I normally use to go skiing, it's good at wicking and should add a bit of warmth.

Personally I would definately not dive without this layer at this time of year and I do not usually consider myself as someone that suffers from the cold. I think you would regret not having the option.

We have one diver in our club that uses a wetsuit all year round, but he really is the exception. Everyone else is using a Dry Suit with thick undergarments.
 
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