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CO Analysers

Discussion in 'Advanced Scuba Discussions' started by Diver71_au, Jan 16, 2018.

  1. DandyDon

    DandyDon Old men ought to be explorers ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: One kilometer high on the Texas Central Plains
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    No, of course not. The disappointment is that DAN and the agencies do so very little to warn or the dangers or suggest the importance of tank testing. DAN did gift Meridiano with Analox inline monitors, but those can be ignore when busy - the time a compressor is most likely to produce CO internally.

    The problem with DAN and the agencies getting onboard with the need seems to be money. Telling students that they need to buy & use tank testers could greatly discourage new divers and the business they bring to the sport.. With the continued lack of sufficient exams disclosing CO injuries and even deaths, and with such being written off as travelers flu and drowning, the companies can continue to ignore the risks.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2018
  2. Lorenzoid

    Lorenzoid ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Atlanta, USA
    9,599
    6,276
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    Did you dive with those tanks?

    If the tanks are on the boat when they pick you up, your choice is to either dive or miss a day of diving--or even your entire trip. I get it that calling a dive for this reason is like calling a dive for any other, but what does one do if essentially ALL the tanks offered during a trip read higher than whatever threshold you would tolerate if you were diving locally?
     
  3. RayfromTX

    RayfromTX Student Of Gas Mixology Staff Member ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Hill Country of Central TX
    7,766
    7,846
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    I don't have any problem diving 1.9. That's rather good in fact. I would consider higher numbers relative to the planned dive depth. I haven't had to make a hard choice yet but it is interesting that they vary by almost three fold. If I were diving a significant bottom time with a PPCO of 10 or greater, I would try to find another tank. I think each diver has to find the level they are comfortable with and that is a good thing.

    I am drawing the line more conservatively than most people. I don't really test because I'm afraid of a 4ppm reading as much as I am a total filter or intake failure that would be a serious, no doubt about it risk.

    I have certainly exposed myself to very high levels when I start up my mower in the garage and drive it out. I have been exposed even worse when working on a job with a kerosene heater trying to keep an uninsulated building warm. I can't even remember all the times I've been exposed. Hunting camps as a kid? I've known people that died from space heaters. The numbers I'm talking about diving are minuscule by comparison but it is different while diving in my opinion and I don't want to get a really bad tank and find out after the fact.

    I try to pass my tester around the boat but more people than not decline to use it even though it is as simple as snapping it on to their inflator hose and watching to see if the reading starts to rise. 15 seconds tops and yet they can't be bothered. Again, I think each diver has to find the level they are comfortable with and that is a good thing.
     
    Coztick likes this.
  4. Lorenzoid

    Lorenzoid ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Atlanta, USA
    9,599
    6,276
    113
    Thanks Ray. I don't wish to derail into another debate about CO testing and what thresholds people are comfortable with, when the OP only asked about brands.
     
    RayfromTX likes this.
  5. Brian G

    Brian G Barracuda

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Pittsburgh
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    If you're looking at the ToxiRAE 3, then I would suggest the MSA equivalent (because I work there). They are both good instruments though. Not as easy to use on scuba cylinders as the Palm maybe. They are designed to measure ambient air and be worn on a belt during the work day around the refining plant or in the mine. I know the MSA one is an industrial-quality unit that was designed to be used all day every day.

    MSA Single Gas Detector, Carbon Monoxide - 2YA39|10092522 - Grainger
     
  6. Doc Harry

    Doc Harry Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Appalachia
    3,572
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    I bought a BW Technologies CO analyzer about 10 years ago, still using it. The analyzer is so small that it easily fits in my shirt pocket.

    [​IMG]
    BW GAXT-M2-DL GasAlert Extreme Single Gas Detector, Carbon Monoxide (CO), 0 to 1000ppm

    I've had to replace the sensor once in 10 years.

    My old analyzer requires semi-annual calibration with a small tank of 10 ppm CO calibration gas. I've done about 15 calibrations and the cal gas tank is still 2/3 full.

    I understand that the newer models have auto-calibration features and don't require a cal gas.
     
  7. kelemvor

    kelemvor Big Fleshy Monster ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Largo, FL USA
    6,745
    3,850
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    How does that connect to the tank? Do you just put it in front of the valve and bleed some gas? Sensor life is one of the biggest flaws in my cootwo.
     
  8. DiveNav

    DiveNav ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Southern California
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    We also have monOx (CO only analyzer) that retails for $229.99 and is as easy to use as its big brother cootwo
     
    DandyDon likes this.
  9. DiveNav

    DiveNav ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Southern California
    3,889
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    The sensor life is determined by the manufacturers of the sensor cells and we respect their recommendation.
    Better safer than sorry.
     
  10. Landstander

    Landstander Solo Diver

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    Given DiveNav's customer service history, I'd strongly recommend avoiding their products.
     
    Hatul likes this.

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