Why not attach spool to DSMB before the dive?

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CosbySweater

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I've been taught this method, but I find it increases complexity for no benefit. We don't hold on to our DSMB, once we have enough gas in it we let it go. Now you're being pulled up while your gear is pulling you down and you have to reestablish buoyancy and trim. It's just a terrible method IMO.

I like to keep things simple where that's possible. Prepare the DSMB for deployment and then use second stage exhaust gas, another reg or LPI to inflate the DSMB. It only takes a couple of breaths at depth and the buoyancy barely has time to change. Additionally, my trim doesn't suffer and I'm not vertical, kicking up, while trying to establish buoyancy again. So not only is it easier, faster and more convenient, but you'll look much cooler doing it :wink:
The main advantage is that there is no change in buoyancy while you are prepping or filling the DSMB and you need only make one buoyancy adjustment during the entire process. These are distinct advantages over other methods and allow for a few precious seconds to ensure neither the DSMB nor the reel line are tangled in any gear, without ascending in the water column. For hunters who take their whole garage underwater with them, this is essential.

The only moment your buoyancy changes is when you release the DSMB, at which point a quick burst from the LP inflator will reestablish neutral buoyancy. You cannot maintain neutral buoyancy using the method you describe without first emptying some gas from your BCD prior to DSMB inflation, and then adding it back in after DSMB release (two buoyancy adjustments). The method I described above removes one of those buoyancy adjustments.

I respectfully disagree with you. With practice, this is the simplest, most efficient, and arguably the safest way to shoot an SMB from depth, IMO. But, everyone knows opinions are like a-holes....:D
 

DeepSeaExplorer

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I've been taught this method, but I find it increases complexity for no benefit. We don't hold on to our DSMB, once we have enough gas in it we let it go. Now you're being pulled up while your gear is pulling you down and you have to reestablish buoyancy and trim. It's just a terrible method IMO.

I like to keep things simple where that's possible. Prepare the DSMB for deployment and then use second stage exhaust gas, another reg or LPI to inflate the DSMB. It only takes a couple of breaths at depth and the buoyancy barely has time to change. Additionally, my trim doesn't suffer and I'm not vertical, kicking up, while trying to establish buoyancy again. So not only is it easier, faster and more convenient, but you'll look much cooler doing it :wink:
Well… you know the number one rule of diving… you have to look good doing it… if you ain’t looking good… you ain’t doing it right…
 

admikar

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The main advantage is that there is no change in buoyancy while you are prepping or filling the DSMB and you need only make one buoyancy adjustment during the entire process. These are distinct advantages over other methods and allow for a few precious seconds to ensure neither the DSMB nor the reel line are tangled in any gear, without ascending in the water column. For hunters who take their whole garage underwater with them, this is essential.

The only moment your buoyancy changes is when you release the DSMB, at which point a quick burst from the LP inflator will reestablish neutral buoyancy. You cannot maintain neutral buoyancy using the method you describe without first emptying some gas from your BCD prior to DSMB inflation, and then adding it back in after DSMB release (two buoyancy adjustments). The method I described above removes one of those buoyancy adjustments.

I respectfully disagree with you. With practice, this is the simplest, most efficient, and arguably the safest way to shoot an SMB from depth, IMO. But, everyone knows opinions are like a-holes....:D
What I would like to know is what configuration you are diving with if you have enough air in your BCD to fill 1/3 of DSMB?
 

boriss

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The main advantage is that there is no change in buoyancy while you are prepping or filling the DSMB and you need only make one buoyancy adjustment during the entire process. These are distinct advantages over other methods and allow for a few precious seconds to ensure neither the DSMB nor the reel line are tangled in any gear, without ascending in the water column. For hunters who take their whole garage underwater with them, this is essential.

The only moment your buoyancy changes is when you release the DSMB, at which point a quick burst from the LP inflator will reestablish neutral buoyancy. You cannot maintain neutral buoyancy using the method you describe without first emptying some gas from your BCD prior to DSMB inflation, and then adding it back in after DSMB release (two buoyancy adjustments). The method I described above removes one of those buoyancy adjustments.

I respectfully disagree with you. With practice, this is the simplest, most efficient, and arguably the safest way to shoot an SMB from depth, IMO. But, everyone knows opinions are like a-holes....:D

There's no change in buoyancy with the method I described. No change in trim, no change in anything. To use the method you described, I'd need to go to completely vertical trim just to get that much gas from my wing at the end of the dive. This would be even more of a problem on CCR or if I were in a drysuit.

I tried the "transfer from wing" approach after reading a similar post some time ago. Being near the end of the dive, hardly anything came out.

There are pills for that :wink:
 

Diving Dubai

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that sounds like a good idea. I do that for some of my DSMBs. Got a pick though? What do you do with the bungee after you deploy?
My Bungee is attached to the Karabiner I have at the end of the spool which attached to the DSMB or what ever else I'm using. I've found that by holding the spool in one hand, and the DSMB in the other and pulling them apart the bungee easily comes off (which is more applicable to you peeps in dry gloves)

I also use a crack bottle so part of that movement is opening the valve with a quick flick of the wrist and off it flies. Highly useful when in a "bit" of a current with a scooter hanging on its leash.

My DSMB is stored in a velcro pocket on my waste belt, I can get it out while still driving the scooter then letting go of scooter quickly deploy. 15 secs would be the max. I spent a lot of time (and a fair bit of money on hardware) to perfect a system that worked in big currents and was simple and reliable.

My dive store is littered with brilliant dive gear improvements that turned out to be rubbish underwater. However all my gear is setup to be optimal for the type of diving (boat, off shore with big currents) so my ideal config may not suit others. I just offer them as an option to think about rather than a the de facto solution
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/swift/

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