Dive boat staff = wet dust cap on Atomic Aquatics reg

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scubadada

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Hi @Scraps

Where do you work? The 6 or 7 SE Florida ops I use work very hard to give a good time but do not switch out tanks, maybe with the exception of divers who are in rented gear and don't seem to have an idea of what to do.
 

Scraps

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Sent you a PM.

Size of boat may be a factor. I'm usually on 6-pax center consoles, where it's easier to manage space with the gear aft and the passengers forward.
 

scubadada

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I remember when buying my first reg 15 years ago agonizing over DIN vs Yoke. I went DIN. Today that cracks me up like it’s even a tough decision.

Nice try! :clapping:

My regulator was DIN, it was dazzling how often I had to use a yoke converter when traveling, in Florida, and internationally. Even though the use of convertible valves has become more common, I bought a yoke regulator to avoid the hassle of using the converter. Nice never being struck in the back of the head by your 1st stage. I use the DIN regulator when I know I have compatible valves, I use the yoke when I don't. When you dive locally with your own cylinders is one thing, when you are traveling and using rentals, it is entirely different. You can always, or nearly always dive a yoke, you can not always dive a DIN, without a converter.
 

JamesBon92007

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The most egregious incident occurred when a guy literally grabbed the tank off my back before I could even walk to sit down, and put my dust cap on totally wet! I immediately removed it and dried it the best I could with a towel (no air to use...) but I'm like, WTH!?

I feel your pain. It has only been for about the past couple of years that I noticed the crew drying my dust cap before putting it back in place. I always double-check everything and I'm happy to say that most of the time things are done properly, but I try to gently let them know that I am particular. To me the worst is the "valet service" and more than once I have gone through my gear bag only to find things missing. Of course some dive ops do a splendid job, but I never know for sure until I do a thorough check.
 

Divin'Papaw

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My regulator was DIN, it was dazzling how often I had to use a yoke converter when traveling, in Florida, and internationally. Even though the use of convertible valves has become more common, I bought a yoke regulator to avoid the hassle of using the converter. Nice never being struck in the back of the head by your 1st stage. I use the DIN regulator when I know I have compatible valves, I use the yoke when I don't. When you dive locally with your own cylinders is one thing, when you are traveling and using rentals, it is entirely different. You can always, or nearly always dive a yoke, you can not always dive a DIN, without a converter.

That was one reason I was reluctant. But the thing is I don’t travel & dive. 99% of my dives are in my own tanks. Without a convertible valve DIN regs are a pain. I’ll grant you that. If I traveled to dive I’d want a yoke reg. But given the diving I do it was really a no brainer decision that I struggled making for 1-2 months.
 

Divin'Papaw

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Nice try! :clapping:

Technically DIN is a superior design. The only reason to have a yoke is if you travel to locations (or rent locally) where DIN valves aren’t available. I don’t & never will. Thus I agonized over a decision that should have been easy. For me. That was my only point. Just an aside to the conversation on the thread.

Yoke regs make perfect sense if you primarily travel or rent tanks.
 

sea_ledford

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Yokes are good for two things; fast gear swaps/fill whip swaps (especially pneumatic ones!), and making DMs look cool with all the o-rings on their watch bands.

I work in an almost exclusive DIN scientific diving world, I forget it's not the norm here. I do miss the fast swaps. I don't miss the o-rings.

This has inspired me to give my DM students a gear swap challenge!
 

Divin'Papaw

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Yokes are good for two things; fast gear swaps/fill whip swaps (especially pneumatic ones!), and making DMs look cool with all the o-rings on their watch bands.

I work in an almost exclusive DIN scientific diving world, I forget it's not the norm here. I do miss the fast swaps. I don't miss the o-rings.

This has inspired me to give my DM students a gear swap challenge!

Well said! Yokes do make for a faster swap that's for sure. And those o-rings! I only dive on 2-3 charters a month and almost without fail someone with a yoke reg has a o-ring blow at least once a month.
 

lairdb

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Yokes are good for two things; fast gear swaps/fill whip swaps (especially pneumatic ones!), and making DMs look cool with all the o-rings on their watch bands.

Hey -- it's not just DMs; I'm a filthy casual and I have a few on my watch band as well. (And have handed one out more than once.

Token on-topic: Once in a while a dive op will pull the gear before I do and cap it; usually they've towel dried it or finger-dried it. Maybe I'm kidding myself, but I believe a drop or three, even driven in at 3000psi, is unlikely to result in an immediate emergency, and I keep an eye on the filter for corrosion or contamination and replace it if detected.

I'm on Atomic second stages as well, and as others have said above, I don't sweat it too hard as long as I know I'll have a chance to let them hang dry first stage up.

Never seen anybody cap while changing tanks -- just for teardown and storage/rinsing.
 
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