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Why extra air when solo?

Discussion in 'Solo Divers' started by pauldw, Jul 11, 2019.

  1. Bert van den Berg

    Bert van den Berg Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: New Zealand
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    A lot of good comments and suggestions... But in the end one really good reason for redundant equipment is that many/most dive operators will not let you dive solo without the redundant equipment.
     
    markmud and MichaelMc like this.
  2. TMHeimer

    TMHeimer Divemaster

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Dartmouth,NS,Canada(Eastern Passage-Atlantic)
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    Agree, but don't forget the OP asked about pony bottle yes/no at 10-30' (my usual type of diving). The rare times I do boat dive I don't seek to go solo.
     
  3. Bert van den Berg

    Bert van den Berg Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: New Zealand
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    I understand completely. It's funny considering different people's take on things. You don't dive solo on boat dives and I only dive solo on boat dives! If I am diving with my wife or son I don't take a pony bottle. If I'm on a boat dive without the son of wife I take the pony bottle and dive solo. Don't want to dive with an instabuddy. Love to talk to them on the boat but don't want the responsibility in the water.
     
    markmud and Nemrod like this.
  4. TMHeimer

    TMHeimer Divemaster

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Dartmouth,NS,Canada(Eastern Passage-Atlantic)
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    Yes true. I've just been pretty lucky with instabuddies (so far).
     
    BlueTrin likes this.
  5. markmud

    markmud Self Reliant Diver--On All Dives. ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: South Lebanon, Ohio
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    Hi Devectionist,

    Your post here, Why extra air when solo? is right on.

    We read excuses such as my primary (and only) regulator system has never failed in a thousand dives. And, I take care of my equipment and have it serviced regularly; therefore, it will never fail. Or, I can do a CESA from my solo depth.

    All of those excuses are a perfect bullseyes for them, until they aren't.

    Yep, rationalization can be a dangerous thing.

    It really is easy to have, travel with, and dive with redundant gear.

    I can't add anything to that statement--it is profound.

    I dive in "my" solo kit whether I am buddy diving or not. Buddies can be flaky, incompetent, and much more.

    In general, if everyone dived in solo kit, diving would be more fun. Group diving would be more relaxed. I am not advocating for an abolition of the buddy system, just a refinement. Let's get real, the buddy system is a flawed system as it is currently taught.

    How many of you have your buddy within an arms length or a few fin kicks away all the time while u/w?

    :cheers:,
    m
     
    Divectionist likes this.
  6. KenGordon

    KenGordon Rebreather Pilot

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    I do, I generally dive in conditions where you can’t see your buddy if they get so far away as not to be a good source of gas.

    If on holiday in some tropical place we still stick together. You do not need to be extremely close, just aware of each other and not a mile away.

    I think a combination of always diving in easy conditions, not having regular buddies and the convenience for dive ops of ‘group’ diving means that very many people never actually dive in the buddy system and so think they need complete redundancy.

    Why do people end up with nothing to breath?

    1 - equipment failure
    2 - failing to surface when low on gas

    I claim that 99% or more of all OOG situations are 2. So why do people fail to surface when low?

    1 - hard or soft overhead
    2 - failure to notice
    3 - notice but continue the dive anyway

    1 is a case of needing to plan properly. If you are doing diving where this is a risk, do it properly. Most people are not so let’s ignore that.

    2 no excuse, margins should be enough that even a photographer will notice in time. Perhaps extremely poor training? I am not sure this really happens much

    3 I think this is common, I have seen people get out with 20 bar having followed a guide and not properly understood that needed to take charge of their own dive. This is also the worst problem as the buddy, if there’s is one, is likely low on gas too.

    Solve 3 and most OOG issue will go away. Unfortunately it probably breaks the holiday diving business model.
     
    markmud and Jay like this.

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