Revo absorbent cloth in exhale lung

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stuartv

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@Wibble Obviously, you have to make your own decisions on hoses. But, here are a few things to consider.

People have been using Cooper hoses on CCR for years.

SubGravity offers them as a standard option on the Defender CCR and on the X CCR. Home - SubGravity Other CCRs offer them as a standard option as well. I think even rEvo USED to offer them as a standard option.

The manufacturer MAY mark them as "Not For Underwater Use" simply to cover their ass for liability. Or, maybe it's a simple fact. They do NOT actually make them FOR underwater use. But, does that really mean they are not suitable for underwater use? If your 18650 Li-Ion batteries had printed on them "Not For Underwater Use" would you eschew using them in an underwater light?

As I said earlier, I got my Cooper hoses for my rEvo from SubGravity. As they are a standard option for their CCRs, I got the impression they normally stock them. I note that what I got are (if I recall correctly) about 2" shorter than the standard rEvo hoses. I think they are 20" versus 22"(?). But, when ordering them I was told that most rEvo guys had chosen to go that way. They seem a little stiff and restrictive at first, but then they break in and are preferred to longer hoses that break in and get a little floppy.

They are apparently even in stock: Cooper Loop Hoses, each - Subgravity

Yes, they do not last as long as silicone breathing loop hoses, and you do need to replace them periodically. I think every 5 years is what is recommended, but totally not sure on that. The metal coil on the inside will eventually be exposed and can start to corrode. But, it seems pretty easy to tell when they are getting near needing to be replaced. You can look inside them and see if the lining is starting to delaminate. Otherwise, I think they are far more durable than the silicone hoses. More resistant, I THINK, to getting a nick on a sharp edge (or the side of a hose clamp) and then gradually tearing open.

I cannot speak to the assertion that they off-gas something that is problematic. I could be wrong about this, but it was my understanding that these Herbert Cooper hoses were specifically made as breathing gas hoses. They say "not for underwater use", but I have never heard that they were not for breathing gas applications. When I put new ones on my DSV, I didn't notice any funny smell or taste (that I recall - it has been 2 years).

@Dsix36 might chime in here. I think he has much more extensive experience using Cooper hoses on rEvo than I do.

I really wish there was a way to make my Cooper hoses work with my rEvo BOV. If there were, I'd still be using them. But, apparently, there is not. The fittings on the hose ends that attach to the BOV itself don't have wide enough flanges, or they stick up too far or something. I can't remember now. I looked into it, determined they wouldn't work, and moved on.
 

lermontov

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@Wibble

I really wish there was a way to make my Cooper hoses work with my rEvo BOV. If there were, I'd still be using them. But, apparently, there is not. The fittings on the hose ends that attach to the BOV itself don't have wide enough flanges, or they stick up too far or something. I can't remember now. I looked into it, determined they wouldn't work, and moved on.
you seem like a resourceful guy Stuart why cant you find someone with a lathe that can make an adapter - that could also make them a smidge longer
 

happy-diver

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Dive with dexterity, dive Cooper

first-dive-suit-or-early-dry-suit-or-diving-equipment-and-mask-the-CXX1AK.jpg
 

jale

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Hi
Regarding drying hoses, the trick to get them with minimal water left after washing them is not only to let them dry and to "concertina" them (nice term:)) but also to shake them regularly during the drying time and also to remove xtra water by taking them by an end and "helicoptering" them...
drying breathing hose is an active job :)
 

grantctobin

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Hi
Regarding drying hoses, the trick to get them with minimal water left after washing them is not only to let them dry and to "concertina" them (nice term:)) but also to shake them regularly during the drying time and also to remove xtra water buyvtaking them by an end and "helicoptering" them...drying breathing hose is an active job :)
People have varying degrees of encouraging this, but it does lead to slightly earlier hose stretching.

Other options:
Dehumidifier
Blower (e.g inflatable mattress blower or rig something with computer fans)
 

jale

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People have varying degrees of encouraging this, but it does lead to slightly earlier hose stretching.

Other options:
Dehumidifier
Blower (e.g inflatable mattress blower or rig something with computer fans)
Yes you are right "helicoptering" must be done with moderation...like eveything else...well almost :)
 

Dsix36

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I have not, and most likely never will, use cooper hoses. Many people like them but the extremely slim chance of them de-laminating and the inner core collapsing during a dive deters me. The exterior never seems to hold up without getting fuzzier than one of my cats either. The cost of them just seems stupid, especially if you are intelligent enough to have at least one more in your save a dive kit.
 

Brad_Horn

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A seemingly outside the box human factors idea, to solve the issue of water being retained in the breathing loop, is to engineer the issue out at the source; through use of smooth inner spiral corrugations.

“Failure due to bacterial contamination is managed by the sterilisation procedure stated in the equipment documentation and by use of a spiral corrugation so that water drains rather than providing as a breading ground for bacteria. The inside of the hose is smooth.” see 4.11.4 https://www.opensafetyglobal.com/Safety_files/FMECA_OR_V4_180821.pdf

With adapters from tecme.de for whatever version of the rEvo you have, the Open Safety spiral corrugated breathing hoses and ALVBOV plug straight onto the rEvo as it offers right to left gas flow. As a bonus you’ll reduce your units WOB in CC mode and oddly know your OC WOB for bailout and gas density consideration. You'll also get rid of the need for hose weights, have a BOV CE’d to 100m in both CC and OC modes, be able to bailout one-fingered, have the loop auto-close if you pull the ALVBOV from your mouth on the surface to talk further preventing water ingress risk and can adjust the breathing hose length.
 
OP
Wibble

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Tried going to that link/site. Seems to be down.
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/peregrine/

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