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Resort's " New Normal " Rule - No AIR 2 or diving your long hose

Discussion in 'General Travel & Vacation Discussions' started by beaverdivers, May 21, 2020.

  1. tursiops

    tursiops Marine Scientist and Master Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
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    You are trolling, and not very well
     
  2. tursiops

    tursiops Marine Scientist and Master Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: U.S. East Coast
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    Long-hose in the time of COVID-19
     
  3. beaverdivers

    beaverdivers ScubaBoard Business Sponsor ScubaBoard Business Sponsor

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    One of the interesting things about this thread is the lack of attention to this question:
    What percentage of your clients run out of air ( OOA) in a week of diving with you? None (0%), almost none ( .0001% ), very few ( .001%), many (.01%) and too many (.1%). I have been thinking back over 40 years of doing group trips and I can not think of one OOA case. My guess is you have had .001% on average.

    The operator, who is not named, never acknowledged the question. I don't think it has been addressed by posters on this thread either. Our group of divers over the last 40 years have had none ( 0% ) to almost none ( .0001% ).

    What percentage of OOA divers do you have in your group of divers?
     
    chillyinCanada likes this.
  4. scubadada

    scubadada Diver Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
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    There has been 1 out of gas episode in all the groups I have dived with in 23 years/a little over 1900 dives. This was in a threesome that I knew while I was diving solo on a moderately deep wreck in SE Florida. This episode was a near drowning. I included this event in the thread Personal involvement in a scuba diving related emergency? Out of gas is the most common scuba related emergency reported in this thread. The poll does not capture number of episodes or any type of denominator.
     
    beaverdivers likes this.
  5. Umuntu

    Umuntu Divemaster

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Traveller
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    Air sharing due to low-on-air events is much more common than out of air events.

    In a resort which also caters for holiday makers, who may be holiday only divers, then low-on-air events can be more often than we would like.
     
  6. scubadada

    scubadada Diver Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Philadelphia and Boynton Beach
    13,944
    10,158
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    Air sharing due to a discrepancy in gas use is completely elective and does not have to take place. I would assume air sharing is mostly among divers who already know each other and, perhaps, risk. This is considerately different than out of gas.
     
  7. tursiops

    tursiops Marine Scientist and Master Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: U.S. East Coast
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    8,873
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    You can't just look at the likelihood of occurrence, you also have to look at the severity of the consequences of the occurrence. Risk is usually defined as consequence x likelihood. If you want to keep it simple (which seems a good idea for this thread) suppose there are three levels of likelihood (low, medium, high) and three levels of consequences (low = annoyance, medium = have to deal with it but it is not life threatening, and high = life-threatening). So, I suspect we would all agree that the likelihood of running out of air is low, but the consequences are high. So the risk involved with running out of air is not negligible, even if the likelihood of it is low. So we train for it and equip for it, to try and mitigate the consequence and thus lower the risk.

    What's not said in your post is that you seem to be concerned about the joint likelihood of running out of air and either (a) Covid-19 is involved in either the donor or receipient, or (b) whether the consequences of having been forced to just change your standard equipment configuration causes you to respond less well to an OOG incident. Some posters in this thread are in the (a) category, some are in the (b). In the (a) category the concern is lowered likelihood of both OOG and Covid-19 happening, but since the consequences are still high (even higher, perhaps) it doesn't change the risk assessment. In the (b) category, we are perhaps less able to mitigate the consequence so the risk is higher.
    Either way, the precautionary principle has been applied by Buddy Dive, which makes good sense until more is known.
     
  8. Gareth J

    Gareth J Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: UK
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    There are two other factors you failed to add.

    1. Customer concern.
    2. Legal requirement.

    The first is subjective, all businesses are worried about the long term effects on their business. Just look at the airlines, laying off staff and grounding large number of planes because they belief the public will be reluctant to travel in the near future.

    In the UK we are still not yet allowed to dive. Some businesses never closed, other are restarting. There is a 2 meter distance requirement, that all individuals are supposed to abide by. Business are required to enforce this, and minimise the proximity of staff and customers. There is now plastic shielding between customers and cashiers in supermarkets, introduced within days of the shutdown in the UK.
     
  9. tursiops

    tursiops Marine Scientist and Master Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: U.S. East Coast
    11,038
    8,873
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    Yes, those are certainly valid concerns, and they very much affect my personal decisions and those for any group I'm taking on a trip.
     
  10. Umuntu

    Umuntu Divemaster

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Traveller
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    Sometimes its necessary in order to make a safety/deco stop safely.
     

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