Looking to Buy a Rebreather

Please register or login

Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

Benefits of registering include

  • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
  • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
  • You can make this box go away

Joining is quick and easy. Log in or Register now!

Wibble

Contributor
Messages
1,961
Reaction score
1,536
Location
UK
# of dives
500 - 999
Nuisance? Flushing the loop out once or maybe twice is a nuisance? Really?
With a hypoxic diluent, flushing the loop shallow really drops the PPO2. If not at 6m/20' overcompensating is a possibility, or at least an inconvenience. Just as easy to flush the loop with O2?
 

tbone1004

Technical Instructor
ScubaBoard Supporter
Scuba instructor
Messages
19,024
Reaction score
11,626
Location
Greenville, South Carolina, United States
# of dives
I'm a Fish!
Nuisance? Flushing the loop out once or maybe twice is a nuisance? Really?

It's a very inefficient use of the onboard O2, especially if as @Wibble said you have a very hypoxic mix in the loop. I much prefer to "park" the rebreather and switch to an offboard second stage. For me it also allows me to blow my nose. I will pop the nose pocket of the mask up and in so you can still see and I will do the gas break inhaling through mouth, exhaling out nose which lets me clear my sinuses. I feel much better after a dive if I do that.
 

nadwidny

Contributor
Messages
1,928
Reaction score
592
Location
Cranbrook, BC
# of dives
I just don't log dives
I do not know what kind of ccr you use, but with a mccr you need to both monitor frequently your ppO2 especially when close to surface and have a mix rich in oxygen on the shallows. If the pasive orifice clogs and you fail to monitor your ppo2 for such amount of time, is an human error on top of a mechanical issue.
No shoot Sherlock. I was there. I know exactly what went down.

I was diving a KISS classic that day. i had 3 or 4 things go sideways on the dive. most of which are unique to an mccr. Sometimes you get the bear, and sometimes the bear gets you. I got lucky.
 

JonG1

Contributor
Messages
307
Reaction score
142
Location
Glossop UK
# of dives
2500 - 4999
No shoot Sherlock. I was there. I know exactly what went down.

I was diving a KISS classic that day. i had 3 or 4 things go sideways on the dive. most of which are unique to an mccr. Sometimes you get the bear, and sometimes the bear gets you. I got lucky.

Any idea when the article will feature in Alert Diver please Nadwidny
 

andrespp

Registered
Messages
30
Reaction score
8
Location
Spain
# of dives
5000 - ∞
No shoot Sherlock. I was there. I know exactly what went down.

I was diving a KISS classic that day. i had 3 or 4 things go sideways on the dive. most of which are unique to an mccr. Sometimes you get the bear, and sometimes the bear gets you. I got lucky.

Please do not keep it for yourself, but elaborate it a bit further so we all can see the lesson(s) learned.
 

andrespp

Registered
Messages
30
Reaction score
8
Location
Spain
# of dives
5000 - ∞
It's a very inefficient use of the onboard O2, especially if as @Wibble said you have a very hypoxic mix in the loop. I much prefer to "park" the rebreather and switch to an offboard second stage. For me it also allows me to blow my nose. I will pop the nose pocket of the mask up and in so you can still see and I will do the gas break inhaling through mouth, exhaling out nose which lets me clear my sinuses. I feel much better after a dive if I do that.

Still think that it is a lesser nuisance to keep breathing the loop than to switch the BOV/DSV to open circuit. Depending of how hypoxic is the DIL, you need to adjust your flushing (duration/number) to obtain the desired ppO2, which it is pretty simple. And you can clear you nose by diving with ccr most of the time. The waste of oxygen on the flushin is minimal as you are supposed to be in the shallows.
 

broncobowsher

Contributor
Messages
2,282
Reaction score
1,761
Location
Arizona
To the OP,

The past few pages are getting deeper into really hard core stuff than what an entry level rebreather really needs to worry about. There will be lots of 2-3 hour dives up to the 200' range that doesn't need anything more than using a properly selected DIL. No gas switches needed, a baby mini flush (exhale through the nose once and add gas of your choice) to adjust the PPO2 during the dive/deco. Not rocket science, not even advanced rebreather techniques. Very basic stuff you learn in the first class.

You are trying to learn the gas and brake pedals and people are talking about trail braking techniques through a corner. It's just how threads drift over time. The discussion goes into a few people talking about everything except what the thread started as.
 

Dsix36

Contributor
Messages
1,563
Reaction score
1,215
Seems an excellent idea.
Any chance of a photo?
I am very reluctant to show my checklist since it is abbreviated and very concise. It works for me but may very well get someone else killed trying to use it. It took me a long time to work out something that was short enough that I would keep using it and still contain the most vital items that works for me personally. I was really trying to show how it could be on the unit full time so there was not an acceptable excuse to not use it.
 

nadwidny

Contributor
Messages
1,928
Reaction score
592
Location
Cranbrook, BC
# of dives
I just don't log dives
Any idea when the article will feature in Alert Diver please Nadwidny

I didn't write it nor submit it so I'm not sure. If it doesn't show up in the next couple of issues I'll post my experience here.

Please do not keep it for yourself, but elaborate it a bit further so we all can see the lesson(s) learned.

See above. I'm not keeping it to myself, I've been very open in what happened, just not here on S'Board (for no particular reason). I've shared my story with many others and some are working on getting it out there in a medium that has a much broader reach than here.

Basically, "Always know your PO2" is more than just a good idea.
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/teric/

Top Bottom