• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

Cool your jets...I mean tanks

Discussion in 'Florida' started by blackvans1234, Jul 18, 2011.

  1. Orlando Eric

    Orlando Eric Instructor, Scuba

    2,414
    123
    +1 -- I was going to say something similar only more "Snarky" (this is my new favorite SB word) and not as helpful.. luckily you were here to beat me to the punch. :)
     
    bilsant and mntlblok like this.
  2. Walter

    Walter Instructor, Scuba

    18,583
    338
    Put a couple of towels (they can be dry, I never use them wet) over them. The tanks will not get nearly as hot.

    Bilsany, Charles' Law has nothing to do with SCUBA tanks. Charles' Law is about temperature and volume. The volume on SCUBA tanks does not change. Following your link, I find the author discussing balloons. Charles' Law is about balloons. Amontons' Law relates to temperature and pressure relationships and applies to hot tanks.
     
    aquaregia likes this.
  3. blackvans1234

    blackvans1234 Divemaster Candidate

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Boca Raton, FLORIDIAN
    440
    51
    I think what they are referring to is the PSI in the tank, and how it is effected by temperature.
    Increased temp -> molecules moving around faster = higher psi
    Something like that :idk:
     
  4. Walter

    Walter Instructor, Scuba

    18,583
    338
    You are correct. That is exactly the situation to which he was referring. That situation is not described by Charles' Law. Charles' Law is often quoted in dive class, but actually has no diving application unless you are in the habit of leaving an inflated BC in a hot car. Charles' Law refers to changes in volume with regard to temperature, it's directly related to hot air ballooning, but not to SCUBA.

    Amontons' Law is almost unknown in the diving world, but is what actually describes the situation many think is described by Charles' Law. Amontons' Law tells us of the relationship between temperature and pressure.
     
  5. Teljkon

    Teljkon Contributor

    71
    5
    Thats about the conceded know it all thing I have heard some one state on scuba board of course charles law applies were talking about heat increasing pressure in a tank. That pressure increase is a function of the the gas expanding its volume from the heat. Thats exactly what charles law is.

    you have a bad case of didnt read the post itis or something because I cant see how you would think it does not apply. Perhaps its not the best formula for the whole interaction but it applies. You would be hard off to even fill tanks if you didnt use charles law to figure out where your tanks were after cooling. Also if your working under the false assumption that the tanks dont expand your wrong they put a REE number on alot of tanks that number stands for Reflexiv elastic expansion.
     
  6. bilsant

    bilsant Regular of the Pub

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Ft. Lauderdale, FL
    964
    989
    The link says "Charles Law". The actual article is entitled "Charles Law, Gas Laws, and Heat", and in fact starts off with an explanation of Charles Law and then goes on to explore the permutation of same which allows calculation of pressure based on temperature when V1 = V2. The author (not me) describes this as the "other half of Charles Law". There is no mention of Admonton, though he apparently first published the derivative law which applies specifically to pressure change within a fixed volume.

    Walter is correct, though most texts discussing Charle's Law automatically make the same leap that Amonton did in applying simple Jr. High algebra to both Boyle's and Charle's Laws, but let's all give due credit to Amonton for his contribution to the gas laws and appropriate points to Walter on catching the technical foul.



    To get back to my original intent in answering the question. Blackvans, did you find out what you needed with regard to leaving your tanks in the car?



    Eric, thank you for not being "snarky" (American definition).

    Walter, thank you for being "snarky" (British definition).

    :D
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2011
  7. Orlando Eric

    Orlando Eric Instructor, Scuba

    2,414
    123
    Well I have used this in pratice with a can of cheese before. I had a couple of crackers left but the cheese was done. I heated the can with a propane torch and got a couple more cheese covered crackers. Dunno who discovered it but it worked for me...
     
    sportxlh likes this.
  8. blackvans1234

    blackvans1234 Divemaster Candidate

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Boca Raton, FLORIDIAN
    440
    51
    Do you have bigger/longer farts in the summer than the winter?
     
  9. bilsant

    bilsant Regular of the Pub

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Ft. Lauderdale, FL
    964
    989
    Hard to tell, because in the winter I'm wearing a wetsuit and the neoprene flaps, too.
     
  10. RonFrank

    RonFrank Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Conifer, CO
    9,106
    345
    To recap....leaving your tanks in a hot car will make little difference in your life or your diving unless you are in the habit of filling your 3000psi tank to 4500psi which is a very bad idea for many reasons.

    This falls under the heading of don't be stupid....
     

Share This Page