• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

Computer to monitor air for two divers

Discussion in 'Computers, Gauges, Watches and Analyzers' started by Snoweman, Apr 29, 2018.

  1. wetb4igetinthewater

    wetb4igetinthewater Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Seattle
    3,226
    1,524
    113
    Oh yeah, I got that part. I just never heard of there being a difference between transmitters of different colors until this thread.
     
    Snoweman likes this.
  2. Lorenzoid

    Lorenzoid idling in neutral buoyancy

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Atlanta, USA
    8,721
    5,189
    113
    I find that two buddies asking each other to sign how much gas they have remaining is a way to keep tabs on more than just the gas. Taking a few seconds to do that throughout the dive affords opportunities to sense stress, narc, discomfort, etc. People can be as oblivious to those things in themselves or, if aware of them, as reluctant to alert a buddy about them as they can gas information. You can't often see your buddy's face for such clues the way you could if you were, say, on a hike in the mountains. A nice relaxed signing of a number in reply to a buddy's inquiry tells more than just how much gas they have left. Just asking "are you okay" every five minutes throughout a dive can get boring, so my wifebuddy and I like to mix it up by sometimes asking each other "okay?" and sometimes asking "gas?" Not to mention sometimes asking things like "Did you see that huge turtle!" We sign a lot to each other throughout the dive for the aforementioned reasons. I know full well that my wife monitors her gas religiously and will take the appropriate action when it's time--we train together. Heck, I know her SAC and can estimate how much gas she has, assuming everything is normal. It's not really the gas we're asking about.
     
    Griffo and outofofficebrb like this.
  3. Kieterkat

    Kieterkat Garibaldi

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: North Carolina
    2
    0
    1
    Hi all. This thread has aged a little so I would like to ask the question again. Could someone please just list the make and model of the dive computers that are able to monitor my air and my buddy’s air. I’m aware of why people disagree on that practice, but it would help my anxiety to have a backup like that for my significant other to be able to see my air. I have a console with my computer and pressure gauge that I will monitor religiously and we will also check in about air regularly. Again. Only interested in the computers that can read his transmitter and mine. Thanks in advance.
     
  4. rsingler

    rsingler Scuba Instructor, Tinkerer in Brass Staff Member ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Napa, California
    2,874
    3,108
    113
    Uwatec Luna & Sol
    I'll presume the G2 does as well

    Shearwater Perdix AI and Teric

    More computers, I'm sure. I dive that way. So does my wife.
     
    outofofficebrb and Kieterkat like this.
  5. Kieterkat

    Kieterkat Garibaldi

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: North Carolina
    2
    0
    1
    Thank you so much for your reply
     
  6. Snoweman

    Snoweman Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Atlanta, GA
    1,556
    591
    113
    Just remember that you will need to be within a few feet of your buddy to read their transmitter.
     
  7. CT Sean

    CT Sean Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Central Connecticut
    1,263
    336
    83
    Looks like a pretty common feature on today's Wireless AI computers. I would pick the one you like and confirm it has multiple transmitter capability
     
  8. dmaziuk

    dmaziuk Orca

    5,032
    1,657
    113
    Just remember to be within 4 feet of your buddy's transmitter at all times.
     
  9. rsingler

    rsingler Scuba Instructor, Tinkerer in Brass Staff Member ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Napa, California
    2,874
    3,108
    113
    Not at all times. Just when you want to know.

    On my Perdix AI, for example, when I look at the graph of a dive for the two of us, my tank pressure line is a solid wiggle all the way down the dive. My buddy's is a set of segments in bold, connected by paler straight line interpolations from the last registered pressure to the first new received value, on and off during the dive, as he drifted in and out of range. Our two lines sort of parallel, at our differing rates of consumption. Mine is complete, his line is a connected set of segments.

    On the computer, there's an interval where "no data" is displayed, eventually replaced with four dashes. When his transmitter comes back in range, his numbers reappear on my computer.
     
    Snoweman likes this.
  10. RonR

    RonR Dive Equipment Manufacturer

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Washington State
    1,218
    446
    83
    RF transmission underwater is going to be limited to a few feet, maybe 2-3 meters, for devices small enough for a diver to carry. Some buddy pairs/ groups might stick really close, others might not. You would just have to determine if the performance fits your goals.
    Liquivision computers (the company has now shut down, so they are only available used and not really supported) used acoustic transmission, which would provide basically line of sight data to a few hundred feet for buddies- I believe up to 10.
    We have a next generation acoustic system in development that provides ranges in the hundreds of feet, but for currently available products I think the answer is that many wireless AI computers provide the capability of monitoring multiple tanks, but will only do so if those tanks are in close proximity.

    -Ron
     

Share This Page