brand new to idea of scooters

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gqllc007

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When you say "assist" with kicking, you may be referring to exactly what I'm looking for. My husband has lost some strength in his legs. He can still kick, but does not do well in significant current. The idea is to have something to assist his kicks when he has to cross a current, not to tow him. Re: scubajet, which one do you mean, the neo 500W or the pro 1000W?
I think ScubaJet is pretty expensive...you need the motor, the nose cone, the middle batteries and finally a handle...Looks like they have a model that would work for $1980 not including VAT
 

tbone1004

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When you say "assist" with kicking, you may be referring to exactly what I'm looking for. My husband has lost some strength in his legs. He can still kick, but does not do well in significant current. The idea is to have something to assist his kicks when he has to cross a current, not to tow him. Re: scubajet, which one do you mean, the neo 500W or the pro 1000W?
the thing with scooters though is that they are best used when towing the diver, far more efficient and that's the point of spending all that money so you don't have to kick when you don't want to or can't.

Neo has enough power for this application but I don't know about burn time requirements.
 

Sam Miller III

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@Mare13
posted at the beginning of this thread

"If I remember correctly, the OP’s husband has health issues that make him unable to swim against current. Someone in the minimal current dive sites thread suggested a scooter.

My question is what happens if the scooter dies in the middle of a dive? Is the OP’s husband going to be able to swim back to the boat hauling the scooter or is the OP going to have to do that? "


@Marie 13, I agree

And most recently:
"Has your husband discussed with his doctor or a physical therapist about improving his physical condition within whatever physical limits he has? As an example, getting in a pool with mask, snorkel, fins, and a kickboard doing laps did wonders for me when I first started diving. It was gentle on my knees and really built-up leg strength.

A decent scooter sounds like it’s going to be outside your budget, plus you’ve got to deal with it when traveling, etc.""



@Marie13 I agree

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Apparently, the OP & posters fail to recognize that recreational SCUBA diving is performed in a hostile everchanging unforgiving environment identified as water.

Modern very abbreviated incremental basic training develops an individual know as a "diver" who is prepared to dive in and cope with only nominal conditions


Incremental training has morphed into and decrees that the diver can and must rely on all the gadgets that have by design or serendipitous appeared in the marketplace which has established recreational diving as an armchair vacation sport

All this is designed to relive the diver from any personal responsibility for their safety. But with all to frequent we read or hear reports:
My mask flooded -- I panicked
I ran out of air -- I panicked
I lost a fin --I panicked
I lost my buddy -- I panicked
I lost sight of the dive guide -- I panicked
My computer flooded -- I panicked
I couldn't inflate my BC -- I panicked
I had to "swim" (snorkel) to the boat -- I panicked
Or
My Scooter stopped running --I panicked

Recall of you will, the basic learning process,
the impact of an idea - practice to perfection,
"Perfect practice makes for perfect perfection"

Since the beginning of recreational diving in the
US (and possibly the world) over 70 years ago (December 1948 to be exact) many have been introduced diving as a recreational activity. Some only sampled diving and moved on, while others discovered it was an all-encompassing lifetime activity

Most recently the members of this board have been presented with a gentleman who is possibly old, weak, can't or has minimum swimming ability or watermanship experience but who wants or needs to have a mechanical device pull him through the water.

Please recognize recreational diving is not for everyone.


I would suggest based on the gentleman's health, experience and diving ability that he takes up a more age-appropriate activity such as pasture pool. He can ride around the pasture in a small cart, chase a little white ball without fear of his health concerns or the cart's battery running down.

And our own @Dandy Don will have no need to investigate and write a report

SDM III

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@tbone1004
@Johnoly
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NothingClever

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@jomcclain

I think you’re in a bit of a tough spot.

The budget limitation (we all have these) is leading you to options that are not likely to last. If you have the resources to replace the budget scooter in another season or so, then disregard. If you, like many of us, want to make a purchase knowing that it will last 3-5 years, then the old adage, “Buy once, cry once.” comes to mind.

The second tough part is the reality of temptation. Once a diver gets on a scooter, the diver’s outlook really changes. I’d say it’s akin to going from walking to riding a bicycle. You’re covering an exceptionally greater distance in a much shorter time at a much more efficient manner and able to take in a lot more scenery.

Diving with a scooter and not using it (except occasionally) would be like going walking and just pushing along your bicycle. Not many people are going to say, “OK, we’re at the top of the hill, I’m going to walk down.” A diver would have to be exceptionally disciplined to only use a DPV every once in a while for an assist. As others have said, the DPV can be cumbersome when not deployed and towing the diver. That factor alone may tempt a diver to just get on with the dive on the scooter.

Another opinion. With great capability comes great responsibility. Using a scooter can introduce an imperceptible risk. As indicated above, a diver can cover a lot more ground than he may proactively think about. A prudent outlook, IMO, is to think at regular intervals during the dive (distance or time) about a scooter failure and what it will take to get back to safety. My rule is to never scooter past what my legs and available gas can handle.

Because of this, my fitness program changed based on my purchase of a scooter. I doubled down on specific leg exercises to keep myself out of trouble in the event of scooter failure. So, while you’re looking for a scooter to relieve your husband from physical demands (noble intention), I think using a scooter actually increases the physical demands if one is to be prepared for a scooter failure. Fear one ‘may not get back’ should not be the first thought when the scooter floods.

OPTION #1: Pay for a personal trainer to help your husband get his leg strength back so you can enjoy the dives in your chosen location.

OPTION #2: If it’s not medically feasible to regain his leg strength through a personal trainer, adjust your diving destinations to where the currents are not likely to exceed his strength.

OPTION #3: Like @scubadada recommended, pay for a DPV course for your husband to get some training and insight into what the options are so that you can make an informed purchase. I’d look for an instructor that has dived a lot of scooters and that isn’t just trying to sell you what’s on the shop floor.

OPTION #4: Buy the economical Yamaha, etc scooter knowing that it will be an experimental purchase and that in another season or so you may be on the hook for another purchase. Note this option will still require dealing with the above temptation and failure factors.

OPTION #5: Hold off buying until the budget loosens up a bit and buy a purpose-built dive tool that has a proven track record amongst more serious divers. Note this option will also still require dealing with the above temptation and failure factors.

Sorry to be so long winded or to complicate things…just trying to offer perspective so that you can make a decision with your eyes wide open.

Best of luck to you with your journey and let us know how you get along.
 

johndiver999

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Too many people are taking things to the extreme. A scooter is a great way to handle currents and get around more efficiently (and probably safer) since you are not exerting yourself.

One has to balance the strength required (and pain in the ass aspects) associated with wrestling the thing onto and off the boat.

For me, it makes a hell of a lot more sense to spend 2 or 3 k for a scooter rather than $1000 for some fancy computer no rec. divers needs at all.

Lastly, scooters are dangerous because they can start and stop working on their own and loosing one would be expensive and embarrassing. So a diver needs to be prepared for both loss and unexpected behavior.

Most importantly, recreational probably shouldn't put themselves in situations where failure of the gear (scooter), could cause a fatality. If you have an smb attached to the scooter and it stops working, or floods and gets heavy, the diver should be able to send it up alone and then abort the dive safely.

A scooter failure should be a nuisance, not a dangerous situation. If a recreational diver approaches scooters with that sort of mindset, I don't thing it is that big of a deal. Of course it takes a little getting use to as well.
 

Marie13

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Me thinks that if the OP gets one scooter for hubby, they’d soon have to cough up the cash for one for her. Something tells me he’d like to go joyriding and she’d not be able to keep up without a scooter.
 

NothingClever

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Too many people are taking things to the extreme.

I’m probably guilty as charged. I often struggle with “good enough” and find it difficult to take my aim point off higher levels of performance and proficiency.
 

Marie13

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I’m probably guilty as charged. I often struggle with “good enough” and find it difficult to take my aim point off higher levels of performance and proficiency.

Actually I don’t think going to extremes is off base in this situation. It’s not like we’ve got a cave diver asking about scooters for cave diving and has been around other cave/tech divers with them. We’ve got warm water vacation divers who didn’t even think about scooters until someone else on SB mentioned them as an option to the OP.
 

scubadada

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Me thinks that if the OP gets one scooter for hubby, they’d soon have to cough up the cash for one for her. Something tells me he’d like to go joyriding and she’d not be able to keep up without a scooter.
Ha, I was thinking the exact same thing, but didn't write it.
 

Wibble

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Scooters are great for getting around the site and getting an overview.

Particularly good for an overall view of a wreck so you can find the bits you're interested in: bow, stern, boilers, etc. Then clip off the scooter and in you go!

When diving on a reef it's something interesting to do to pass the time (if it's not rusty, it's not interesting!)
 
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