Advice on Wing/BP brands

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Zef

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@Capucine971, si vous habitez vers nord pas de calais et vous plongez en belgique, la carriere de lillée à spiremont est un test center pour la marque Techline.

-Z
 

Zef

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@Zef no I meant 12.5kg, equivalent to 28lb (sorry, my bad, I’m used to the metric system). It seems like the smallest lift available...

In my local dive shop, as prices go, the XDeep Zeos is actually the least expensive at 430euros (which I found weird, considering that the wing/BP/harness are already all assembled...); followed by Techline at 470euros and then the OMS is the priciest at 520.

Some of you mentioned that it was fine getting an aluminium plate while some recommended steel. If I were to go for aluminium (and won't need much weight in warm water), would I still be able to use it comfortably in cold water (with the addition of some weight)?

My wing size recommendation still stands...unless you plan to dive doubles you will not need one larger than 12.5kg.

The benefit of a steel plate is that one does not need to carry/wear as much lead since the weight of the plate makes up for some weight in lead. If you don't need a lot of lead in the first place then an aluminum plate may be preferential, but if you plan to dive in cold water on a regular basis with a thick wetsuit (7+mm), semi-dry, or drysuit then it may be of benefit to have a steel plate, but there are lots of options available to attach lead to your harness and or plate so it should not be an issue with either aluminum or steel.

Aluminum is a bit lighter which is beneficial for airline travel where baggage weight can be an issue. Steel plates, arguably, are more resilient if doing a lot of ocean diving or pool diving where the salt of the ocean and chlorine in the pool water can attack any exposed aluminum where the anodized coating gets scratched, at least that is my observation.

I restate my recommendation to at least try/get fitted for a small plate for comparison with a standard length one. It made a huge difference for my wife.

-Z
 

Centrals

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I had a look at the DGX custom bcd, and they can ship it to France for free. But then, I would have to assemble it and fit it myself... but as someone mentioned, that should be easy enough to do with the help of online tutorials?

@Zef no I meant 12.5kg, equivalent to 28lb (sorry, my bad, I’m used to the metric system). It seems like the smallest lift available...

In my local dive shop, as prices go, the XDeep Zeos is actually the least expensive at 430euros (which I found weird, considering that the wing/BP/harness are already all assembled...); followed by Techline at 470euros and then the OMS is the priciest at 520.

Some of you mentioned that it was fine getting an aluminium plate while some recommended steel. If I were to go for aluminium (and won't need much weight in warm water), would I still be able to use it comfortably in cold water (with the addition of some weight)?
1. It is NOT rocket science to assemble BP/W.
2. I knew you were talking 12.5kg as there is no wing comes in 12.5lb.
3. US$350.00 = Euro 300.00
4. The difference between Al and S plate is NOT that big ~1.5kg(DGX model). There is thicker and heavier SS plate though.
5. There should be plenty of used SS plate in the market.
6. I never have any issue with corrosion in both my Al and SS plate.
 
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Capucine971

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My wing size recommendation still stands...unless you plan to dive doubles you will not need one larger than 12.5kg.

The benefit of a steel plate is that one does not need to carry/wear as much lead since the weight of the plate makes up for some weight in lead. If you don't need a lot of lead in the first place then an aluminum plate may be preferential, but if you plan to dive in cold water on a regular basis with a thick wetsuit (7+mm), semi-dry, or drysuit then it may be of benefit to have a steel plate, but there are lots of options available to attach lead to your harness and or plate so it should not be an issue with either aluminum or steel.

Aluminum is a bit lighter which is beneficial for airline travel where baggage weight can be an issue. Steel plates, arguably, are more resilient if doing a lot of ocean diving or pool diving where the salt of the ocean and chlorine in the pool water can attack any exposed aluminum where the anodized coating gets scratched, at least that is my observation.

I restate my recommendation to at least try/get fitted for a small plate for comparison with a standard length one. It made a huge difference for my wife.

-Z

Thanks! Unfortunately, I'm from the South, so won't be able to test Techline in Sprimont :/

I'll try to see with my local dive shop to compare a standard backplate and a small one. Although it doesn't say that small backplates are available on their website, maybe they have them in stock...
 
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Capucine971

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1. It is NOT rocket science to assemble BP/W.
2. I knew you were talking 12.5kg as there is no wing comes in 12.5lb.
3. US$350.00 = Euro 300.00
4. The difference between Al and S plate is NOT that big ~1.5kg(DGX model). There is thicker and heavier SS plate though.
5. There should be plenty of used SS plate in the market.
6. I never have any issue with corrosion in both my Al and SS plate.

Thank you! I will also have a look at second hand plates; if the assembly is not hard, it might be good way to save some money :wink:
 

happy-diver

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Here's a plate made in USA by an esteemed Scubaboard craftsman

full.jpg


isn't it beautiful


However it sets itself apart being hand hewn from the exclusive stainless steel




not the sub standard aluminium
 

Zef

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Whether or not you purchase a plate fully assembled, you will still need to make adjustments to it while wearing your exposure suit. The difference between threading a harness and then making the adjustments or just making the adjustments on a pre-threaded harness is about 10 to 15 minutes.

The major chore with a BP/W is getting the adjustments where you want them...it is not difficult, just time consuming, and there is no real value in paying a shop to do it for you because it is truly a trial and error type of thing. You might find that after 10 dives you want to make a 2cm change of a D-ring position...setting things up from the start will facilitate understanding and making adjustments in the future.

-Z
 

-JD-

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Here's a plate made in USA by an esteemed Scubaboard craftsman

View attachment 653216

isn't it beautiful


However it sets itself apart being hand hewn from the exclusive stainless steel




not the sub standard aluminium
One of Eric's freedom plates in Small, and Thin would be a great option for the OP and will be very close in dry-weight to an AL plate.

However, wait time, shipping, and single-tank only may be limiting factors for the OP.
 

Addison Snyder

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I would have to assemble it and fit it myself... but as someone mentioned, that should be easy enough to do with the help of online tutorials?
It's easier than it sounds. They've got some instructions, and worst case you can reference almost any bp/w guide, as the process is similar across them all. Took me maybe half an hour, and I was experimenting with different positions of doodads that I did have on it (rubber tubes for holding lights, etc). And for saving a couple hundred dollars, you'll be able to spend that in other more important things in scuba (tanks, regulators, trips, etc.).

Over the long run, DGX equipment is generally more readily serviceable, as they stay away from wonky proprietary designs and (generally) make all of their service kits available to the public.
 
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