Please register or login

Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

Benefits of registering include

  • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
  • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
  • You can make this box go away

Joining is quick and easy. Log in or Register now!

Jaan

Ask me about DRYFOB
ScubaBoard Supporter
Messages
180
Reaction score
315
Location
Aventura, Florida
# of dives
200 - 499
Congratulations on the purchases ... it's a satisfying feeling having all your own gear. Take good care of it and it will last you a long time. Enjoy the diving.
Once you get in the routine of getting to the site or boat, setting up, diving, and cleaning you'll get a handle on what you need in terms of clips, silicon octo holders, bags and bins and racks to dry. There was another thread recently all about cleaning and rinsing techniques. We just rinse in the tub, have some cheap plastic bins for regs, cameras, knives, lights.... We use a coat rack with some good BDC / Wetsuit hangers. I also have a boot dryer :)
 

Gandalf-the-Diver

Contributor
Messages
230
Reaction score
219
Location
Victoria, B.C., Canada
# of dives
200 - 499
Alrighty then. I've managed to get irritated enough in about 15 dives to want my own gear (more or less) immediately. Like most of us, I have pockets that you can see the bottom of and want to choose wisely.

I would consider myself an "advanced beginner" or "beginning advanced" due to evaluations by commercial divers, ex-military divers, and my instructors. I'm Advanced Open Water and Nitrox certified. I'm also an ex-infantry officer, very comfortable in water, and contingency/emergency awareness and planning are natural to me. I will not trust an insta-buddy with my life and don't have a regular buddy, so I want to get to full redundancy - especially on dives around and below 100ft. I will also dive in varying conditions (cold/warm, deep/shallow, wreck/cavern, river/ocean blah blah) so I want gear that is flexible. Not the "switching-from-singles-to-doubles-without-changing-my-wing" kind of thing, but environmentally so. I'm also setting myself up for tech diving.

I would like help from ye ole' salts on here to help me laser in on two things. Thing 1 is what to splash with, Thing 2 is when to acquire said splashy thing. Hopefully, this will be useful to other doe-eyed divers that are tired of ill-fitting, free-flowing, weight-dropping, swiss-cheesed neoprene gear. I've met other newer divers who didn't know what to get first as everything seems important in its own way.
THANK YOU ahead of time! :cheers:

Thing 1 - Gear: What do you recommend for these?
-Computer: I've decided on the Shearwater Perdix AI. Next.
-Wetsuit: 5mm seems to be the most flexible thickness. Won't boil you in warm water, pretty good in chilly stuff, especially with something underneath. Need to get a hood too, I suppose.
-Regulator: DGX XTRA long hose set, or their Dive Rite long hose set. I've heard Deep 6 is good too. I want something environmentally sealed and probably diaphragm. These seem to be very good value and comparable quality when compared to Atomic, Apeks, etc.
-BP/W: Need help with this. Dammit, DGX, you're out of stock! I really like the idea of their singles wing package, but I think SubGravity or OMS would be good too. I really like the idea of the OMS backpad with weights so I can adjust for fresh/salt water, etc. Here's what I've worn in the past:
freshwater:
-5mm wetsuit
-Zeagle Ranger BCD
-AL80
-12lbs of weight (felt close to neutral, maybe slightly light)​
saltwater:
-no wetsuit
-terrible, floaty rental jacket BCD - ScubaPro?
-AL80
-6lbs of weight (that was not enough, the AL80 wanted to snorkel. 8-9 lbs probably good)​
The Ranger is +1-2lbs, an AL80 is around +3 empty, which means I need around 7-8lbs of weight in freshwater without the cylinder. My thoughts are to get an aluminum plate and 30ish lb wing, which might be light for a 5mil wetsuit in saltwater with AL80 but not for freshwater with a HP80/HP100. I don't want to be over-weighted in freshwater with a steel cylinder, and I can add ballast/trim weights if needed for diving saltwater with an AL80. Does that seem logical?
-O2 Analyzer: Palm D? DGX seems to have good ones, but I'm up for suggestions. I'm Nitrox qualified and will dive Nitrox on most dives.
-Full Redundancy: Like I said, I won't trust an insta-buddy with my life, and there's a very small chance something could go wrong with the regs... or...anything/someone else. I'm very interested in a "pony bottle", and I've read here that AL30 or AL40 is generally recommended. It also seems smart to sling it on my left side. Is there anything else special I need to know, or some reason I shouldn't carry a pony (especially 100+ft)?
-Cylinder: I really do want to dive with steel. I don't like AL80's positive buoyancy.

Thing 2 - When: What should I get first?
While all of these seem pretty essential, what should I get right off the bat? I suppose the main tank could wait until last, but what are your thoughts? Here's what I'm thinking. I put them in my order of priority... Please let me know if I'm on the right track.

1. Wetsuit: This is definitely going to be first, actually, so let's move on... :wink:
2. O2 Analyzer: I am sure most LDS and charters do their mixes well... "trust but verify". This seems like it should be at the top so I know what I'm breathing. Two children recently died at a dive site I was at a few weeks ago because their parents/dive leaders didn't check the air they hooked up on their hookah. This forum doesn't allow four letter words, does it?
3. Full Redundancy: I say again, I won't trust insta-buddies with my life. Very high up there.
4. Regulator: Since I will dive Nitrox regularly and add AI later, this seems high priority.
5. BP/W: Hard to get trim and buoyancy right if you keep borrowing BCDs. Also would probably have a hard time slinging a pony on a jacket rental BCD.
6. Computer: A few people have told me that I should buy a computer first, but my military mind bucks against that. If a diver can't understand what the computer is doing and why, I think they should practice fundamentals and deepen their understanding of diving first. The computer should not be a crutch but a tool. I should be able to dive without a computer, sticking with my plan and CESA/air share/improvise if necessary. After all, plenty of people safely dived without them in decades past. I'll splash with tables and cheat sheets, fine with me. Is it imperative I get this right away?
7. Cylinder: Probably last... I can suck it up with AL80 rentals... for now. I can dive, woohoo!

If you've made it to here, thank you for the help. I really do appreciate it and hope this helps others!


I got my OW last September. Before my course had even started, I had all the gear I needed, including a drysuit. I used the gear list from the SDI Solo, and PADI Self Reliant courses to determine what gear I needed to buy. I started out with a 13cu pony as my redundant air source, and tried slinging it on the side, then diagonally across my chest. I now use a 30cu pony.
A computer is a must have. Shearwater is the preferred "tech" brand, however, they also have a recreational use computer, the Peregrine. Best bang for the buck. Shearwater quality, at an affordable price. No AI, but that can wait. Redundancies also include two computers, and if you are thinking about a solo course, these are MUST HAVE items, not nice to have.
A lot swear by a BP/W bcd, in my mind, a back inflate bcd is what you need. BP/W bcds are just that, but so are other bcds, Scubapro Hydros for example.
One responder mentioned the Solo course, Marie13 mentioned the 100 dive requirement. It does not take long to get there if you are diving lots. As I said, my OW was last Sept, AOW last Nov, started that with 40 logged dives. I just did the SDI Solo course 2.5 weeks ago and I am currently sitting at 171 dives, all in 10 months of diving.
Having your own gear, allows one to dive often. When you get to cylinders, steel for main and aluminum for pony.
Have fun, dive safe.
 

ginti

Contributor
Messages
1,143
Reaction score
803
Location
Lyon, France
# of dives
200 - 499
6. Computer: A few people have told me that I should buy a computer first, but my military mind bucks against that. If a diver can't understand what the computer is doing and why, I think they should practice fundamentals and deepen their understanding of diving first. The computer should not be a crutch but a tool. I should be able to dive without a computer, sticking with my plan and CESA/air share/improvise if necessary. After all, plenty of people safely dived without them in decades past. I'll splash with tables and cheat sheets, fine with me. Is it imperative I get this right away?

There is an agency that thinks exactly like that - GUE. I think you should get their fundamental course before buying anything: the instructor probably will let you try the equipment for free (or for a good price).

P.S. You mentioned "cold/warm" and "shallow/deep". What is "cold" for you? And what is "deep"?
 
OP
The Cosmicist

The Cosmicist

Contributor
Messages
288
Reaction score
154
Location
47°9′S 123°43′W
# of dives
0 - 24
I got my OW last September. Before my course had even started, I had all the gear I needed, including a drysuit. I used the gear list from the SDI Solo, and PADI Self Reliant courses to determine what gear I needed to buy. I started out with a 13cu pony as my redundant air source, and tried slinging it on the side, then diagonally across my chest. I now use a 30cu pony.
A computer is a must have. Shearwater is the preferred "tech" brand, however, they also have a recreational use computer, the Peregrine. Best bang for the buck. Shearwater quality, at an affordable price. No AI, but that can wait. Redundancies also include two computers, and if you are thinking about a solo course, these are MUST HAVE items, not nice to have.
A lot swear by a BP/W bcd, in my mind, a back inflate bcd is what you need. BP/W bcds are just that, but so are other bcds, Scubapro Hydros for example.
One responder mentioned the Solo course, Marie13 mentioned the 100 dive requirement. It does not take long to get there if you are diving lots. As I said, my OW was last Sept, AOW last Nov, started that with 40 logged dives. I just did the SDI Solo course 2.5 weeks ago and I am currently sitting at 171 dives, all in 10 months of diving.
Having your own gear, allows one to dive often. When you get to cylinders, steel for main and aluminum for pony.
Have fun, dive safe.

Holy hell, I should have done it your way. I'm incredibly jealous of how often you get to dive! You're right, you can dive a lot more with your own gear. Unfortunately I live in an area where you have to travel at least 2 hours for good diving, and I'm not in the position to do that all the time. This will change soon! I also got discouraged because the instructors I've learned from didn't meet my standard of professionalism. I've learned I will just have to seek out great instructors and travel to them if needs be.

Funny you mentioned the Peregrine. I came to the same conclusion. I will definitely get a second computer soon, but a Peregrine is being delivered this week so I can start with that.
 
OP
The Cosmicist

The Cosmicist

Contributor
Messages
288
Reaction score
154
Location
47°9′S 123°43′W
# of dives
0 - 24
There is an agency that thinks exactly like that - GUE. I think you should get their fundamental course before buying anything: the instructor probably will let you try the equipment for free (or for a good price).

P.S. You mentioned "cold/warm" and "shallow/deep". What is "cold" for you? And what is "deep"?

I am very interested in GUE, but I'm also wary of them because I see a bit of groupthink. I've already ordered a bunch of stuff but most of it is all DIR compliant (harness, bp/w, reg set is long hose, etc.). I definitely want to take their fundies class, but I don't think that there is only one way to do things well.

Speaking of their mindset, don't they prohibit computers? Maybe I'm mistaken... But that was one reason I'm wary of going hook, line, and sinker with them. I like what they teach and what they stress as important, but prohibiting computers just seems silly.

Deep and cold are relative, I suppose... I consider "cold" to be drysuit diving (although diving dry in warm water sounds fine to me). I'd definitely try ice diving someday. Warm to me is 5mm wetsuit and warmer. Blue Heron in summer, like I've done? Warm. Caves in N. Florida? Warm... At least the ones I've been in. The Great Lakes, Alaska, Andrea Doria? Cold.

Deep for me is anything below 100'. I'm still new at this, and I want to make this a lifelong hobby. As in, a long, full life haha. Until I get a little more experience around 100' and below, that's my "deep". A year from now, that will probably be different.
 

Gandalf-the-Diver

Contributor
Messages
230
Reaction score
219
Location
Victoria, B.C., Canada
# of dives
200 - 499
Holy hell, I should have done it your way. I'm incredibly jealous of how often you get to dive! You're right, you can dive a lot more with your own gear. Unfortunately I live in an area where you have to travel at least 2 hours for good diving, and I'm not in the position to do that all the time. This will change soon! I also got discouraged because the instructors I've learned from didn't meet my standard of professionalism. I've learned I will just have to seek out great instructors and travel to them if needs be.

Funny you mentioned the Peregrine. I came to the same conclusion. I will definitely get a second computer soon, but a Peregrine is being delivered this week so I can start with that.


I am lucky in that I live on a world class dive island. I am in Victoria, on Vancouver Island. There are literally tons of shore dive sites near me. index (victoriabcdiving.com) Now that I have my solo cert, I do not have to hunt for buddies, although I took the course mainly so when I do dive with ppl who are better on air than me, when time, I can wave see ya later and come up solo.
 
OP
The Cosmicist

The Cosmicist

Contributor
Messages
288
Reaction score
154
Location
47°9′S 123°43′W
# of dives
0 - 24
Unbelievable... Lucky you! I saved that site for the future. Must be a fun place to live. You guys have good metal bands too up there. I'm long overdue for a trip to Canada...
 

ginti

Contributor
Messages
1,143
Reaction score
803
Location
Lyon, France
# of dives
200 - 499
I am very interested in GUE, but I'm also wary of them because I see a bit of groupthink. I've already ordered a bunch of stuff but most of it is all DIR compliant (harness, bp/w, reg set is long hose, etc.).

There are a lot of misconceptions about GUE.

I agree that in some local groups there might be a bit of groupthink, but it is really rare in my experience. And the GUE way is by definition not the best way to do things, it is just a good way to dive that proved to be very safe.

[EDIT: standardized is the opposite of optimized!]

To give you an idea, you can look on Facebook for "Andrea Marassich". He is a top GUE cave instructor (rated instructor evaluator for the cave curriculum, the only one in Europe). He often dived with top divers from other organizations (some names: Phil Short, Rob Neto, etc.). Why do I mention this? Because it shows that GUE divers can be flexible and for sure can find agreements with divers with different backgrounds, so the groupthink issue is way less relevant than non-GUE divers think. It basically doesn't exist.

I definitely want to take their fundies class, but I don't think that there is only one way to do things well.

Agree 100%, and I strongly encourage you to dive with people from different agencies and mindsets. I do this :)

Speaking of their mindset, don't they prohibit computers? Maybe I'm mistaken... But that was one reason I'm wary of going hook, line, and sinker with them. I like what they teach and what they stress as important, but prohibiting computers just seems silly.

Not at all. Computers are accepted and suggested. Many GUE divers go for shearwater, I go for Garmin - but I do not like it :)
This is JJ, founder and president of GUE, with Fred Devos (instructor evaluator for cave survey) and their shearwaters on their wrists: https://www.instagram.com/p/BY7lyMvgfRi/

On the other hand, during gue courses, you will be trained to dive even with just a bottom timer and a depth gauge. You will learn how to plan deco in advance and how to modify it during the dive (depending on the order of magnitude of the deviations). At least, at the tec1 level, I don't know for deeper dives.

Deep and cold are relative, I suppose... I consider "cold" to be drysuit diving (although diving dry in warm water sounds fine to me). I'd definitely try ice diving someday. Warm to me is 5mm wetsuit and warmer. Blue Heron in summer, like I've done? Warm. Caves in N. Florida? Warm... At least the ones I've been in. The Great Lakes, Alaska, Andrea Doria? Cold.

Well, let's not consider the wording for now. You want to try all the spectrum of diveable temperatures, so you need to evaluate trilaminate drysuits and heavy undergarments. Another +1 for GUE fundies :)

Deep for me is anything below 100'. I'm still new at this, and I want to make this a lifelong hobby. As in, a long, full life haha. Until I get a little more experience around 100' and below, that's my "deep". A year from now, that will probably be different.

Right now, it seems you are just interested in recreational depths, so let's skip the discussion about deco.
[As a side note, even if deco fascinates you, you need a bit of experience before to start thinking about it.]

Moving back to my suggestion, I really think that you should take GUE fundies because it seems really aligned with your way of thinking. After the course, you can decide to go for a different route if you want. However, there are alternatives to Fundies with other agencies, so if you really dislike GUE go for one of them. But do a favour to yourself: chose one course (GUE/IANTD/TDI/whatever) and do it BEFORE buying all the equipment; or at least, go for an evaluation day with a tec instructor. The pieces you want to buy are fairly expensive, so it's better to try them so to avoid buying the wrong things.

A quick point on the computer: a Perdix is absolutely an overkill if you don't do trimix dives. A peregrine would be better, but since your diving may evolve soon, I would personally buy a cheap computer to save money, and then go for a serious one in a couple of years. But that's me :)
 
OP
The Cosmicist

The Cosmicist

Contributor
Messages
288
Reaction score
154
Location
47°9′S 123°43′W
# of dives
0 - 24
There are a lot of misconceptions about GUE.

I agree that in some local groups there might be a bit of groupthink, but it is really rare in my experience. And the GUE way is by definition not the best way to do things, it is just a good way to dive that proved to be very safe.

[EDIT: standardized is the opposite of optimized!]

To give you an idea, you can look on Facebook for "Andrea Marassich". He is a top GUE cave instructor (rated instructor evaluator for the cave curriculum, the only one in Europe). He often dived with top divers from other organizations (some names: Phil Short, Rob Neto, etc.). Why do I mention this? Because it shows that GUE divers can be flexible and for sure can find agreements with divers with different backgrounds, so the groupthink issue is way less relevant than non-GUE divers think. It basically doesn't exist.



Agree 100%, and I strongly encourage you to dive with people from different agencies and mindsets. I do this :)



Not at all. Computers are accepted and suggested. Many GUE divers go for shearwater, I go for Garmin - but I do not like it :)
This is JJ, founder and president of GUE, with Fred Devos (instructor evaluator for cave survey) and their shearwaters on their wrists: https://www.instagram.com/p/BY7lyMvgfRi/

On the other hand, during gue courses, you will be trained to dive even with just a bottom timer and a depth gauge. You will learn how to plan deco in advance and how to modify it during the dive (depending on the order of magnitude of the deviations). At least, at the tec1 level, I don't know for deeper dives.



Well, let's not consider the wording for now. You want to try all the spectrum of diveable temperatures, so you need to evaluate trilaminate drysuits and heavy undergarments. Another +1 for GUE fundies :)



Right now, it seems you are just interested in recreational depths, so let's skip the discussion about deco.
[As a side note, even if deco fascinates you, you need a bit of experience before to start thinking about it.]

Moving back to my suggestion, I really think that you should take GUE fundies because it seems really aligned with your way of thinking. After the course, you can decide to go for a different route if you want. However, there are alternatives to Fundies with other agencies, so if you really dislike GUE go for one of them. But do a favour to yourself: chose one course (GUE/IANTD/TDI/whatever) and do it BEFORE buying all the equipment; or at least, go for an evaluation day with a tec instructor. The pieces you want to buy are fairly expensive, so it's better to try them so to avoid buying the wrong things.

A quick point on the computer: a Perdix is absolutely an overkill if you don't do trimix dives. A peregrine would be better, but since your diving may evolve soon, I would personally buy a cheap computer to save money, and then go for a serious one in a couple of years. But that's me :)

Thanks for the thoughtful reply. GUE definitely peaks my interest and I've been interested in finding a fundies class for awhile. I unfortunately won't be able to go until next year, I think. But it's good to know that some of what I've read isn't true (no computers, cult-ish mindset, etc.). I think it would be valuable training and would instill good fundamentals. I've been diving with the "classic" depth gauge, SPG and a watch for a timer, so I should be good there! The Peregrine I ordered just arrived this afternoon. That will be luxurious! I agree about the Perdix being overkill at the moment. The Peregrine will serve me well for awhile until I really need a trimix computer.

Weeeeellll, I am very interested in going beyond recreational depths. I simply said I consider below 100' to be "deep" for me because I am a pretty new diver and need experience. But my goals and interests lie far beyond recreational depth and time limits. Deco is something I absolutely am interested in and 100% will do in the future. But I need to seek out the training, and to qualify for the training I need more dives! Oh, twist my arm, I have to dive more. :D
 

Gandalf-the-Diver

Contributor
Messages
230
Reaction score
219
Location
Victoria, B.C., Canada
# of dives
200 - 499
Alrighty then. I've managed to get irritated enough in about 15 dives to want my own gear (more or less) immediately. Like most of us, I have pockets that you can see the bottom of and want to choose wisely.

I would consider myself an "advanced beginner" or "beginning advanced" due to evaluations by commercial divers, ex-military divers, and my instructors. I'm Advanced Open Water and Nitrox certified. I'm also an ex-infantry officer, very comfortable in water, and contingency/emergency awareness and planning are natural to me. I will not trust an insta-buddy with my life and don't have a regular buddy, so I want to get to full redundancy - especially on dives around and below 100ft. I will also dive in varying conditions (cold/warm, deep/shallow, wreck/cavern, river/ocean blah blah) so I want gear that is flexible. Not the "switching-from-singles-to-doubles-without-changing-my-wing" kind of thing, but environmentally so. I'm also setting myself up for tech diving.

I would like help from ye ole' salts on here to help me laser in on two things. Thing 1 is what to splash with, Thing 2 is when to acquire said splashy thing. Hopefully, this will be useful to other doe-eyed divers that are tired of ill-fitting, free-flowing, weight-dropping, swiss-cheesed neoprene gear. I've met other newer divers who didn't know what to get first as everything seems important in its own way.
THANK YOU ahead of time! :cheers:

Thing 1 - Gear: What do you recommend for these?
-Computer: I've decided on the Shearwater Perdix AI. Next.
-Wetsuit: 5mm seems to be the most flexible thickness. Won't boil you in warm water, pretty good in chilly stuff, especially with something underneath. Need to get a hood too, I suppose.
-Regulator: DGX XTRA long hose set, or their Dive Rite long hose set. I've heard Deep 6 is good too. I want something environmentally sealed and probably diaphragm. These seem to be very good value and comparable quality when compared to Atomic, Apeks, etc.
-BP/W: Need help with this. Dammit, DGX, you're out of stock! I really like the idea of their singles wing package, but I think SubGravity or OMS would be good too. I really like the idea of the OMS backpad with weights so I can adjust for fresh/salt water, etc. Here's what I've worn in the past:
freshwater:​
-5mm wetsuit​
-Zeagle Ranger BCD​
-AL80​
-12lbs of weight (felt close to neutral, maybe slightly light)​


saltwater:
-no wetsuit​
-terrible, floaty rental jacket BCD - ScubaPro?​
-AL80​
-6lbs of weight (that was not enough, the AL80 wanted to snorkel. 8-9 lbs probably good)​


The Ranger is +1-2lbs, an AL80 is around +3 empty, which means I need around 7-8lbs of weight in freshwater without the cylinder. My thoughts are to get an aluminum plate and 30ish lb wing, which might be light for a 5mil wetsuit in saltwater with AL80 but not for freshwater with a HP80/HP100. I don't want to be over-weighted in freshwater with a steel cylinder, and I can add ballast/trim weights if needed for diving saltwater with an AL80. Does that seem logical?
-O2 Analyzer: Palm D? DGX seems to have good ones, but I'm up for suggestions. I'm Nitrox qualified and will dive Nitrox on most dives.
-Full Redundancy: Like I said, I won't trust an insta-buddy with my life, and there's a very small chance something could go wrong with the regs... or...anything/someone else. I'm very interested in a "pony bottle", and I've read here that AL30 or AL40 is generally recommended. It also seems smart to sling it on my left side. Is there anything else special I need to know, or some reason I shouldn't carry a pony (especially 100+ft)?
-Cylinder: I really do want to dive with steel. I don't like AL80's positive buoyancy.

Thing 2 - When: What should I get first?
While all of these seem pretty essential, what should I get right off the bat? I suppose the main tank could wait until last, but what are your thoughts? Here's what I'm thinking. I put them in my order of priority... Please let me know if I'm on the right track.

1. Wetsuit: This is definitely going to be first, actually, so let's move on... :wink:
2. O2 Analyzer: I am sure most LDS and charters do their mixes well... "trust but verify". This seems like it should be at the top so I know what I'm breathing. Two children recently died at a dive site I was at a few weeks ago because their parents/dive leaders didn't check the air they hooked up on their hookah. This forum doesn't allow four letter words, does it?
3. Full Redundancy: I say again, I won't trust insta-buddies with my life. Very high up there.
4. Regulator: Since I will dive Nitrox regularly and add AI later, this seems high priority.
5. BP/W: Hard to get trim and buoyancy right if you keep borrowing BCDs. Also would probably have a hard time slinging a pony on a jacket rental BCD.
6. Computer: A few people have told me that I should buy a computer first, but my military mind bucks against that. If a diver can't understand what the computer is doing and why, I think they should practice fundamentals and deepen their understanding of diving first. The computer should not be a crutch but a tool. I should be able to dive without a computer, sticking with my plan and CESA/air share/improvise if necessary. After all, plenty of people safely dived without them in decades past. I'll splash with tables and cheat sheets, fine with me. Is it imperative I get this right away?
7. Cylinder: Probably last... I can suck it up with AL80 rentals... for now. I can dive, woohoo!

If you've made it to here, thank you for the help. I really do appreciate it and hope this helps others!
Get the computer 1st. AI and the compass are nice on the Perdix, but if you can do without those options, the Peregrine is a great option at less than half the price. It would also make a great back up computer, when you do get a Perdix. (future redundancy plans)
The adaptability of the Shearwater to change while you are diving is amazing.
Ok, so I went on a spree and, thanks to payment plans, am almost where I want to be. For any other new divers coming here from the future, hopefully this will be helpful to you. Also, is half the world under water in your time? For those of us that are still living, is the diving good? Anyways...

  • Wetsuit: Bought. Yay, I'm a real boy.
  • O2 Analyzer: I decided to hold off based on what everyone said. I will also generally be diving in the US for now where DOT and other standards are hopefully followed, so I felt the CO analyzer could wait as well. I'll make sure to badger dive shops and charters about using the O2 analyzer at minimum.
  • Full Redundancy: Working on this. Another member is going to sell me their Dive Rite deco reg set (I hope). It's a bit old, but is great for ponying (?) after servicing. Working on the cylinder. If anyone wants to sell an AL40 or knows someone that does, please point them my way.
  • Regulator: Bought the DGX Dive Rite Long Hose package.
  • BP/W: Bought the Pirahna Dive Shop SS backplate and harness package and the SubGravity 30lb wing. EDIT: OMS 32 lb Mono Wing. SubGravity couldn't be shipped in any reasonable amount of time.
  • Computer: I reconsidered this and bought a Shearwater Peregrine. It seems to fit my needs perfectly and is half the cost of a Perdix. I will still carry cheat sheets and tables with me, but the benefits of a computer for safety are just too numerous to ignore. It's up to me to not use it as a crutch!
  • "Tech" shorts: For the pocketses, my precious.
  • Light: Bought a Dive Rite CX2 and elastic handmount.
  • Compass: DGX
  • Cylinder: Patience, Yago. Not yet.
And some bolt snaps and such. Thank you to everyone who gave their advice and suggestions. After I finish tracking down the AL40 and some rigging, I should be set for quite a long time. If anyone has any other suggestions or advice, I'm all ears!
You will like the Peregrine. I have over 200 dives on mine.
 

Top Bottom