72's Scuba Tanks

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Luis H

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So, I presume, that such tanks can never get an "Oxygen Clean" rating???

That is a good question, but why bother… there are plenty of other good steel 72’s that could be O2 clean if needed. I own eight other steel 72’s that have no internal coatings.

Even if it could be clean, the coating itself could very easily be very combustible in a high O2 environment. Actually, most coating are probably combustible in that environment but I am just guessing on this one.



BTW, in my last post it seems that I am implying that the blue coating is also a thick coating… I did not mean to imply that. I don’t really know how thick is that coating. I have only seen it a few times.
 

lowviz

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None of my 72's have an internal coating. I just put the O2 issue out there so people would be aware of the "limitation" before they buy...
 

LadyDiva

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There is an inconsistency here. Re-qualifying a tank involves both a hydro-test and a visual inspection - both are part of the process and he can't stamp the tank until he has done both. So, if he stamped the tank, he did a visual inspection, yet he does not want to put a scuba industry standard VIP sticker on it? That's really strange. It also suggests a lack of confidence on his part about the liner itself.

I was referred to this particular Hydro Facility by a Fire Chief who I respect and trust….

You are entitled to your opinion, but after he allowed me into his shop and walked me through the preliminary inspection (even letting me see into the tank)….., it's not that they don’t WANT to "sticker" the tank or that they “lack confidence”, it's that they don't HAVE the stickers to put on the tanks that the LDS looks for when they fill the tank. The Hydro-Tester’s job is to HYDRO them, not to issue costly stickers that the LDS wants to see.

This Hydro-Tester was very honest in his preliminary inspection….that, there was no reason he couldn’t do the Hydro…..BUT, if the LDS won’t VIP them because of the liner, I’m wasting my money to Hydro them if the LDS won’t fill them. Most Hydro facilities would have taken my money and let me deal with the LDS after the fact.

NO….I don’t work for a Hydro-Testing facility or a LDS…..Actually, a very “green”, intermediate diver who’s done lots of homework/searches on the subject…. Just seeing both sides to the argument and seeing it’s more about one’s “interpretation” or “opinion” in regards to the regulations and/or standards. From what I’ve read, there’s not ONE “consistent” answer.
 

Nemrod

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I make my own VIP stickers, never had an issue with them even in Florida. I carefully inspect all of my tanks for damage, rust, corrosion on a more frequent than yearly schedule. The VIP is not a legal requirement and for people who have their own compressors and do their own fills there is the argument that they do not need a hydro or a VIP.

N
 

spectrum

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LadyDiva,

It sounds like you have a competent hydro shop that knows that knows the antics of the LDS.

1) Confirm the LDS refusal to pass on your liners
2) Find another shop.

If you go elsewhere and the LDS has convictions local fills may be a challenge.

3) buy a compressor. :)

Pete
 
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oldschoolto

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I make my own VIP stickers, never had an issue with them even in Florida. I carefully inspect all of my tanks for damage, rust, corrosion on a more frequent than yearly schedule. The VIP is not a legal requirement and for people who have their own compressors and do their own fills there is the argument that they do not need a hydro or a VIP.

N
No VIP sticker would be need to use or fill a tank... But the tank must be in hydro date to be use/filled by DOT reg/law... When I had my 72's hydro'd they got a sticker like you see on most compressed gas bottles.... Sticker stated that the cylinder was inspected and for use with breathing air... Looked at the stickers on my stargon and my argon welding cylinders and the sticker states that the bottle was inspected and for use with industrial gas...

I just had my printer make my up a sheet of scuba VIP stickers and had the hydro shop but it on, Was not a problem at all.... :wink:

jim...
 

DA Aquamaster

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This is total BS! If the liner is in perfect condition they will test and pass them. Myself and a few others in this thread have already said they have had this done recently. The OP posted a quote from the DOT email she received saying the same thing. It is the less then reputable LDS that want these tanks taken out of service NOT the DOT! What LDS or manufacture do you work for?
Take a chill pill dude. If you've found a hydro tester that will pass it, more power to you - the reality is that's pretty rare, and it will be 100% dependent on the inspector being able to determine that there is no rust underneath the liner, and that's just not possible with all types of liners used in the past.

Personally, I removed the liners from my own tanks as it adds essentially nothing to the tank. If you get decent gas fills rust is just not a problem, so why have the liner in the first place.
 

Bob DBF

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You are entitled to your opinion, but after he allowed me into his shop and walked me through the preliminary inspection (even letting me see into the tank)….., it's not that they don’t WANT to "sticker" the tank or that they “lack confidence”, it's that they don't HAVE the stickers to put on the tanks that the LDS looks for when they fill the tank. The Hydro-Tester’s job is to HYDRO them, not to issue costly stickers that the LDS wants to see.

They don't have anyone certified to do VIP. The hydro shop I deal with had their hydro guy certified to do SCUBA VIS and now picks up additional revenue on a tank and does not have to do anything additional because the visual required as part of the hydro is equal to or better than any shop monkey VIS you will get.

I was not paying attention when it happened but, there was a time when you did not have to have a VIP sticker during the first year of the hydro because it was implicet in the hydro stamp.




Bob
-----------------------------------------
I may be old, but I'm not dead yet
 

halocline

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They (the hydro facilty) don't have anyone certified to do VIP.

Gee, that's just like our dive shop!:wink: That certainly doesn't stop them from selling stickers, though.

As has been said, the annual VIP sticker is nothing legal, just a U.S. dive industry practice. Therefore, nobody needs a license or permit to attach a sticker. It really does come down to who owns the compressor and what tanks are they willing to fill.

A quick question; why couldn't a solvent be used to dissolve the liner, then some aggressive tumbling and cleaning to remove all trace of the solvent? Is the issue that nobody is confident that traces of the solvent would not remain in the tank?
 

spectrum

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A quick question; why couldn't a solvent be used to dissolve the liner, then some aggressive tumbling and cleaning to remove all trace of the solvent? Is the issue that nobody is confident that traces of the solvent would not remain in the tank?

Residual fumes may be an issue.

Before that though i think cost may be a bigger issue. Once a solvent were identified enough would be needed to dissolve the lining into solution. Then some number of solvent rinses would be needed to get the cylinder clean. Even then a residual film is likely and that may trap material that could out gas or need to be tumbled for a final cleansing.

At some point these things become more trouble than they are worth. If you have a local path of minimal resistance that is great but otherwise it may be better to park/sell and watch for plain steel replacements. The investment should not be s such that walking away is prohibitive. If you are on a Quixotic quest then knock yourself out.

Pete

---------- Post Merged at 10:14 AM ---------- Previous Post was at 10:10 AM ----------

As has been said, the annual VIP sticker is nothing legal, just a U.S. dive industry practice. Therefore, nobody needs a license or permit to attach a sticker. It really does come down to who owns the compressor and what tanks are they willing to fill.
The other catch often comes down to whose sticker it is. Divers can print/buy stickers and individuals may be trained by a body such as PSI or not. Some shops will cast a jaundiced eye on any sticker that is not from a known commercial dive shop. The concern is that the sticker has been applied without the backing of liability insurance and we all know that the lawyers and insurance companies are at root of it all.

Pete
 
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