Wing Size Advantages and Disadvantages

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Alaskan Scuba Dude

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In that case, do you just drop the weight belt when you're surfacing and recover it somehow, or how does the weight belt fix the problem?
You can offset the weight distribution by using a steel tank in cold water. He means that some harness/backplate/wing configuration only allows so much lead weight. Don't use a weight belt if you wear a harness with a crotch strap. Distribute the weight on the tank but less is better.
 

Bierstadt

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One of the best things about BP/W is its modularity. The smaller wing is a bit smaller, a bit more streamlined, has a bit less drag, but if you want a wing that can do cold water and warm then get the bigger wing to cover everything and later you might pick up a small wing just for the warm stuff, if you'd like. Used wings can be great deals too, especially for a second wing.
 

inquisit

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You can offset the weight distribution by using a steel tank in cold water. He means that some harness/backplate/wing configuration only allows so much lead weight.
Actually he doesn't. It is immaterial whether one uses lead bricks or less buoyant steel tanks or less buoyant steel backplate. If the wing cannot offset the total negative buoyancy, that configuration is a bad idea. Moving ballast onto your body where it is supported by the wetsuit reduces the demand on the wing, thereby "fixing the problem".
 

Gone for diving

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I would rather go a bit bigger than smaller wing,
Especially if it's your first wing.

My first wing is a dive rite classic.
60lb lift. I love it, I am glad I got it. Its 20years old,
With a single tank it's big, and likes to taco.. but we put a single bungee on each side to hold it down... works well.

But now I hold it in place very similar to a sidemount rig. With a piece of bungee that holds the wing tips to the waist strap.
(That way its probably more like a 45lb lift, because it can't fully inflate...)
 

Centrals

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I would rather go a bit bigger than smaller wing,
Especially if it's your first wing.

My first wing is a dive rite classic.
60lb lift. I love it, I am glad I got it. Its 20years old,
With a single tank it's big, and likes to taco.. but we put a single bungee on each side to hold it down... works well.

But now I hold it in place very similar to a sidemount rig. With a piece of bungee that holds the wing tips to the waist strap.
(That way its probably more like a 45lb lift, because it can't fully inflate...)
I have no issue with bungee but smaller wing is NOT that expensive.
 

inquisit

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Don't use a weight belt if you wear a harness with a crotch strap.
I know I shouldn't feed the troll, but for the benefit of the OP....

This is a common statement among poorly instructed divers who do not understand how to weight themselves and do not have a balanced rig. By design, the wing should be practically EMPTY at the end of the dive at the safety stop (tank at reserve pressure)! They think a diver has to be able to rip off the belt in an instant to avoid sinking to the depths if their wing failed. With a balanced rig / properly weighted, you can swim up with your belt (by definition). With very thick wetsuits, you might consider making SOME lead ditchable (e.g., 5 lbs if your AL80 tank is full) as this will render you neutral at safety stop depth. (You don't need that lead because the non-reserve air weighs 5 lbs on its own.)

If you drop a 25 lb weight belt at depth, your ascent will become uncontrolled as the wetsuit regains buoyancy. I actually WANT my weight belt to be caught by my crotch strap if it accidentally becomes unbuckled.

Once on the surface, it can absolutely be beneficial to lose the belt in an emergency. It is quite easy to pull it out from under the crotch strap.

To turn it around, do the math regarding the worst-case lost buoyancy of your particular wetsuit. If you cannot swim up to compensate for that amount (15 lbs seems doable by most, based on past threads), the better option is redundant buoyancy: either a drysuit or a double bladder wing.
 

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20years ago 300$ was alot of money
For me,

And I knew I wanted to dive doubles at some point
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/perdix-ai/

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