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Why carry mask backwards at surface?

Discussion in 'Hogarthian Diving' started by SpaceGeek, Dec 15, 2008.

  1. nereas

    nereas Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Expat Floridian travelling in the Land of Eternal
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    Shops do not teach divers to wear masks on their foreheads.

    Cave divers like wearing their masks backwards as they walk out into their spring ponds. No problems there. Hopefully they will remember to put them on before they descend. No need of a snorkel there either, for a spring pond. For quarries or lakes, the same would be true.

    I you are approaching Father Ocean, it is strongly suggested that you have your mask on correctly. That is what shops teach. Because if Father Ocean reaches out and touches you with a rogue wave, you will need your mask on correctly. And preferably your reg or snorkel in your mouth.

    Mother Earth is very forgiving, but Father Ocean beats up on his foolish children.
     
  2. nereas

    nereas Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Expat Floridian travelling in the Land of Eternal
    2,735
    6
    0
    RJP you have had way too many martinis in your NJ pond (jacuzzi) already today.:rofl3:
     
  3. Charlie99

    Charlie99 Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Silicon Valley, CA / New Bedford, MA / Kihei, Maui
    7,966
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    That's one sign. As pointed out by Diver0001 in a recent thread, a sign of stress can also be a diver being very quiet and subdued.

    From http://www.scubaboard.com/forums/accidents-incidents/260067-rescue-diver-theory-vs-practice.html:
     
  4. Nemrod

    Nemrod Solo Diver

    11,584
    1,738
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    Just put it on your forehead where it belongs when not in use and be done with it.

    N
     
  5. Charlie99

    Charlie99 Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Silicon Valley, CA / New Bedford, MA / Kihei, Maui
    7,966
    156
    63
    I find it more convenient to put it in my mask case when not in use. :D
     
  6. tflaris

    tflaris Liveaboard

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Neptune Beach, FLorida USA
    390
    20
    18
    As an Instructor I find that many Students/Divers in times of high anxiety tend to pull gear off and want to remove themselves from the high stress situation that their brain is experiencing. Basic human nature fight or flee.

    I teach my students this practice because it lets the Dive Master on the boat know that you as a diver are OK and not experiencing a high stress or anxiety moment requiring rescue.

    But I always stress that when in the water including climbing back onto the boat always keep your mask on and have access to air whether snorkel or regulator just in case of the unforeseen.

    I also teach this technique because it keeps your hands free to balance yourself on the boat and aid in getting to the back of the boat.

    Hope this helps.
     
  7. goodive

    goodive Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Vancouver BC
    117
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    If I see somebody, with MOF I might give them quick O. K. and if I get O. K. back I know they are fine. If I get a blank stare, I get closer and talk to them. I do not consider MOF a distress signal. Even with a relatively minor problem (negatively buoyant on the surface, kicking hard to stay afloat) I've never seen anyone to put their MOF to get an attention. Waving hands, or a screaming is more likely. To answer the question, I put my mask backwards in the calm water, on my face in the rough water or a teaching situation when I have to have a snorkel.:inquisition:
     
  8. tflaris

    tflaris Liveaboard

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Neptune Beach, FLorida USA
    390
    20
    18
    Removing gear even when in the pool is a common sign of anxiety or stress. It can prove difficult when working as a Dive Master and a Diver is at the surface to make these kind of observations can be difficult unless they are extremely close.
     
  9. goodive

    goodive Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Vancouver BC
    117
    0
    0
    Hi tflaris, my post is not a reaction to what you said. Your post came in as I was typing mine ( my typing skills - OW level). I agree with what you said. I was just generally reacting to MOF being not reliable distress signal. I teach to wave hands to get an attention.
     
  10. jeckyll

    jeckyll Solo Diver

    2,279
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    We really need another MOF thread? :)
     

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