Question Where are you viewing the 2023 & 2024 Solar Eclipses?

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DandyDon

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We traveled to Rapid City SD & Yellowstone for the 2017 Total Eclipse, leaving Lubbock a week before the big event to visit various National Parks & Monuments across Wyoming. Most of the family had to be back on the 22nd so we left Yellowstone early on the 21st to fly out of Idaho Falls with a stop on the Centerline for the Eclipse, hoping for clear skies. I don't remember the city's name, but we got off somewhere and headed to the closest park - but it was full! We drove to the second furthest park from the highway finding it crowded, but at the last city park we found parking, portapotties, and only a few hundred others already waiting. The skies were clear, it was great, and we caught our plane home in plenty of time.

The Saturday, October 14, 2023 Annular Eclipse will be a great show for those on the centerline blessed with clear skies and the foresight to order Solar Eclipse glasses. USA - Mexico - 2023 October 14 Annular Solar Eclipse - Interactive Google Map - Xavier Jubier

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I'll check the weather the night before, then decide to drive 222 miles to Bottomless Lakes SP, 166 miles to Hobbs NM, or 195 miles to Odessa, stopping for a Subway along the way. The Annular phase starts around 16:40 UT or 11:40 CDT so I'll want to be in position by 10:40 CDT/9:40MDT to watch the last hour before maximum obscuration and the glorious Ring Of Fire. I've never seen an Annular Eclipse at maximum so I am really looking forward to it. I've already bought the family the first set of Eclipse T-shirts and 40 pair of glasses to share with family and friends even if they stay home for 86% obscuration.

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For the second one, Monday, April 8, 2024: Mexico - USA - 2024 April 8 Total Solar Eclipse - Interactive Google Map - Xavier Jubier

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I'll check the weather the day before and decide to drive 341 miles to Gatesville, 347 miles to Fredricksburg, or 399 miles to Uvalde. We'll probably book rooms most of the way to the chosen destination, then drive two more hours the next morning.

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On a whim, I checked hotels for that weekend in Gatesville, and they were all sold out for miles. Dozens are available the following weekend, but not then. Whatever was available was booked and maybe some hotels blocked off the rest of the rooms for future ideas or sales. I suspect this is true along the centerline all across the nation now, a year in advance. Any place north of Gatesville is closer to the DFW metroplex so could be swamped so I hope the best weather is not to the east. Wherever we go, Totality starts around 18:30 UT or 13:30/1:30pm CDT so we want to pack lunch and be there by 12:30pm to watch the hour of Partial before.
 
Nice for you Don, both are passing through your home state :) . Are the eclipses in Texas bigger, too?

I have some friends who are about to move out to Nashville, so maybe the 2024 eclipse will make a good excuse to visit them, and take a road trip out to KN, MO or IL. The 2023 one, I dunno, maybe San Antonio. I hear it's pretty hot that time of year, so maybe Southern Oregon would be easier for me, not to mention closer.
 
Below is an image of the two paths.

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I tested my Coronada Max II Solar Telescope a few years ago in Kentucky. So, since I live in Ann Arbor, I will take my scope to Toledo to be in the path of totality.

Total solar eclipses are definity worth viewing ... just remember to protect the eyes.
 
Oct 2023, I'll head out to the Valle Caldera just west of Los Alamos. Right in the centerline and one of the most spectacular settings in all of New Mexico.

April 2024, I will drive or fly to see family in Waco.
 
Here is a photo from the 2017 Solar Eclipse showing exactly what not to do. Sometimes you just can't fix stupid.

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The 2023 one, I dunno, maybe San Antonio. I hear it's pretty hot that time of year
Some of the kids and I passed thru San Antonio last month on our huge spring break road trip. My daughter specifically wanted to visit the Japanese Tea Garden. We had it to ourselves 40 years ago when I first took her, but it was swamped in people.

The average high temp there for Oct 14 is 83F, record high 97F, so no, not bad.
 
I won't get to anywhere that I'll really be able to see the one this year, but for the 2024 one, where I live in SW Ontario, the "Band of Totality" will pass about 20 miles south. I was thinking of going to someplace like Niagara Falls or maybe the north shore of Lake Erie ( maybe the town of Port Dover) to see and photograph it.
 
I won't get to anywhere that I'll really be able to see the one this year, but for the 2024 one, where I live in SW Ontario, the "Band of Totality" will pass about 20 miles south. I was thinking of going to someplace like Niagara Falls or maybe the north shore of Lake Erie ( maybe the town of Port Dover) to see and photograph it.
This years Annular Eclipse is not getting any press that I've seen while next years Total a year off has had several I've noticed. I'd expect Niagra Falls just a few miles from the centerline to be swamped, but the north shore of Lake Erie looks more appealing. Do you have the camera filters you'll need?

I read that prices for solar viewing glasses went up considerable right before the 2017 Eclipse. There are several listings on Ebay for old stock but new and certified glasses that are cheap. That they are marked for the 2017 event is not an issue.

I’ll be watching the 2024 one from my backyard. Welding helmets are great for eclipses, btw.
Dallas will get almost 4 minutes of totality so I agree. No need to fight the crowds on the centerline for an extra minute. Some welding helmets are safe for viewing the sun, I remember doing so as a kid, but I've read that some glasses are not rated as safe. This site says only level 14 is safe: Can I Use Welding Glasses to Look at the Sun?.

I burned my eyes a few times growing up that way, with the pain kicking in after I'd gone to bed, including my wedding night. No fun.
 
I read that prices for solar viewing glasses went up considerable right before the 2017 Eclipse.
That won't be a problem for me. :D In February, I went to the Toronto Outdoor adventure Show and in addition to having a large dive and dive travel section, one of the other booths that was set up was the Canadian Royal Astronomical Society (or something like that - apologies if I got the name wrong) and they were giving out viewing glasses for free, I got several sets.

I have reached out to the Canadian Raptor Conservancy who have a property just north of Lake Erie about the possibility of them using their property as a viewing/photography area.

As for having appropriate filters, I have a 10 stop and a 6 stop ND filter which will give me 16 stops. That is what I planned to use. I have a mirrorless camera so while I will have to protect my sensor, I will not be looking at the sun through an optical viewfinder, only an EVF or on the monitor on the back, so basically a very small TV.
 

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