What about flare?

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rjack321

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No. It is not. That’s another problem. I don’t have the time to design a special canister. But all I see out of the shelves is either too bulky or unreliable.
 

rjack321

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I recently purchased a Nautilus Lifeline GPS and an ACS PLB but given the 24 hours battery life, I don’t think it is bulletproof. I would use the Nautilus first then the PLB thus expect to be rescued within 48 hours.
So flare is no-go 😭
You are not going to survive drifting around the south china sea for 2 days. You can read about the post sinking loses from the USN Indianapolis for instance, between the sun, dehydration, and sharks your survival window is a day-ish.

All the fancy western technology is not going to save you when you can to some extent be predictable and easy to pick back up by the boat in the first place. Especially when the locals may barely have marine radios.

Don't go wandering off from the boat,
Use a large, tall SMB early don't want until you surface 2km downcurrent
Carry the yellow garbage bag as a backup surface signaling device
Come up and get their attention if you aren't able to follow the dive plan (current going the wrong way)
Don't go getting engrossed in the sea life (with a camera)
Be responsible for being easy to find in a place they expect you to be (more or less)
 

rjack321

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Flares come in other varieties besides incendiary. The incendiary flares seem to expire every three minutes. So a few years ago, I bought a USCG approved electronic flare. It’s basically a really bright strobe that continuously flashes SOS. This could be taken on a plane with no issues.

While it’s water resistant, it not depth rated, so it would need to go in a canister. That would be fairly bulky.

My primary dive light also has an SOS mode. It doesn’t have the 360 degree visibility of the e-flare, but shining it into a DSMB while in strobe mode should be visible from many directions.
A single 18650 powered LED diving backup light turns into a strobe when you wave your hand in front of it. It's also already waterproof, and lasts 4 to 8 hours on low. The visual horizon from a diver on the surface to a searcher sitting in a small vessel is only a a few km anyway, save the battery by using a low power setting
 
OP
Dody

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You are not going to survive drifting around the south china sea for 2 days.
At least one man survived 4 days there. But I will take your advice.
 

BLACKCRUSADER

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When I was in Brunei we had flares. I think they were " borrowed" from Brunei Shell and were brought on night dives. Only one was ever used when we drifted away in a current and could not get back to the boat.

Dody works in the oil industry so I am surprised he would not know about waterproof flares. My Big Blue Video lights have the emergency light signal beacon and there are underwater strobes that blink which can been seen from far away in the dark of night. The batteries on the big blues last hours on low power. My dive torch is good for around 90 minutes if left on.

I can't wait to see a trip report from Dody with getting lost on a day dive and was rescued at night. He will get lucky and some fishing trawler will find him.


 

Divin'Papaw

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I have one of these with me on every drift dive along with a primary Bigblue LED light. It lives in one of my pockets. I far prefer this to a flare.

 

DiveProKoko

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FWIW, when I was in the military, the first thing they teach you in survival school for rescue purposes is to carry a signal mirror. During daytime searches you are WAY more likely to be seen using a signal mirror than not. And they don't burn out (like a flare) over time. Also, think about when you will be found and when search operations take place. Most operations cease at nightfall. Having a light source is good, but if you are found at night, it will more likely be by chance from a non-search vessel. That is, unless you are on a night dive and the dive boat is doing the primary, initial search, but that's a whole different scenario that your night diving equipment will suffice in. But don't expect the Coast Guard to be flying over the water for hours at night while you're floating at sea. That typically doesn't happen. A good SMB, a mirror, and a whistle are all you REALLY need for practical purposes. I'm not criticizing anyone choosing to carry extra safety gear, just promoting a scaled down option for those who don't want to carry a tool box worth of signaling gear in the water. LOL!
 
OP
Dody

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When I was in Brunei we had flares. I think they were " borrowed" from Brunei Shell and were brought on night dives. Only one was ever used when we drifted away in a current and could not get back to the boat.

Dody works in the oil industry so I am surprised he would not know about waterproof flares. My Big Blue Video lights have the emergency light signal beacon and there are underwater strobes that blink which can been seen from far away in the dark of night. The batteries on the big blues last hours on low power. My dive torch is good for around 90 minutes if left on.

I can't wait to see a trip report from Dody with getting lost on a day dive and was rescued at night. He will get lucky and some fishing trawler will find him.


 
OP
Dody

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I used to work in the oil industry. Not anymore. I was not a diver at the time. I also lived in Brunei working for Schlumberger a subcontractor of BSP. Worst time in my life. Apart from Jerudong Park during the week-ends, I felt like killing myself on a daily basis. Did not have the correct visa to go for short trips to Malaysia :).
 

BLACKCRUSADER

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I used to work in the oil industry. Not anymore. I was not a diver at the time. I also lived in Brunei working for Schlumberger a subcontractor of BSP. Worst time in my life. Apart from Jerudong Park during the week-ends, I felt like killing myself on a daily basis. Did not have the correct visa to go for short trips to Malaysia :).

I worked in BSB at the Australian High Commission we were the floor above the American Embassy down town by the river. We actually worked Monday thru Friday morning so had Friday afternoon and the weekends off. We worked Fridays so those who had the day off work could come for consular and immigration services. I could just take the boats from the river front into Malaysia or drive south across the border. I know a lot of expats found life difficult but the money for them was good all tax free. Lots of school teachers from the UK as well and most of them wanted to immigrate to Australia. If you were there after Sharia Law was introduced then I can understand why you would have hated it.

There was a flight from the airport to KK every Friday afternoon so could take an extra day off on a Monday and stay at the Tanjung Aru which is now the Shangri La hotel and go diving from there. I used to play squash at the park and enjoy the pool there. All diplomats were given free membership there. We could also take the helicopter flights to the longhouses in the jungles as well. Also from 1986 - 1988 you could get alcohol there and in any case diplomatic missions would import a lot for the necessary functions we had to host.

For me being young and having learned Malay at an Australian government language school for 40 hours a week for several months it was an interesting time. That schooling was great being in a government office but useless at a market or where people spoke local mixed languages.
 
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