Warmest undergarment available?

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boat sju

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sju, are you suggesting Polartec instead of Lavacore? Or in addition? I don't want to add thickness, just warmth. Do the polartec ones have windblock?

The Lavacore looks like a thin base layer meant to wick sweat away from your skin. Maybe it's thicker than I think but yes, I was suggesting adding the polartec over it. I wear a snug UnderArmour workout shirt under a 200 wt Polartec sweatshirt. Hunting longjohns under polartec sweatpants. This is good at about 55 deg. Below that I add a DUI vest which is made out of basic Polartec fleece.

Polartec is just a good brand of 100% synthetic fleece, so it comes in different clothing styles and options. Some can have an added windbreaking layer. Polartec Wholesale Fleece Fabric | Polartec Fleece Fabric by the Yard | Mill Direct Textiles
 

RJP

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I never like "stewing" in my own sweat, even in my undergarments here in temperate SoCal homewaters. So I don't understand why anyone would want to wear a drysuit in tropical warm waters of 28deg C or more.

You're in the tropics people --diving wet immersion in a skinsuit is a luxury to be enjoyed!

You've never been in a 30/30... no sweat.
 

Darnold9999

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You probably know this, but look to your hood as well. Your head is not well insulated and a significant part of your heat loss goes through there. You will not necessarily feel cold there, but it will impact how well the rest of your body can cope with lower termperatures.
 

Kevrumbo

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You've never been in a 30/30... no sweat.
I've seen a leaky TLS350 on a dive buddy in 28deg C Sunda Strait waters on the HMAS Perth wreck --he was as wet as I was in my skinsuit.

I was more comfortable at depth --and contentedly peeing at will like a newborn baby:wink:!
 

lowviz

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...//... I'll try adding a vest, ...//...

You have a great DS / undergarment combo that will be a nice option for those "iffy days" back home.

Try the vest, see how much farther it gets you. (you can always use two of something that you like) If somewhere else gets cold before your planned divetime, work on that next with another garment that you can re-use back home. Keep going that way until you get the dive time you want at a comfort level that doesn't ruin your enjoyment. You are approximating coldwater gear while starting with what you have. Nothing wrong with that. It is just layering. There is a bit of an art to it.

Physical shivering is not being wussy. It is how your tropical bod reacts to cold water. Get out, dive over. Been there many times in the past while dialing in my layering.

-you should be able to qualify for a cold water specialty cert after all this grief. :shocked2:
 

Quero

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You have a great DS / undergarment combo that will be a nice option for those "iffy days" back home.
It really never gets iffy at home, at least not in the way a drysuit would help :wink: Sometimes we do need a stock of dramamine and a rain jacket, though.

Try the vest, see how much farther it gets you. (you can always use two of something that you like) If somewhere else gets cold before your planned divetime, work on that next with another garment that you can re-use back home. Keep going that way until you get the dive time you want at a comfort level that doesn't ruin your enjoyment. You are approximating coldwater gear while starting with what you have. Nothing wrong with that. It is just layering. There is a bit of an art to it.
That's the strategy for tomorrow.

Physical shivering is not being wussy. It is how your tropical bod reacts to cold water. Get out, dive over. Been there many times in the past while dialing in my layering.

-you should be able to qualify for a cold water specialty cert after all this grief. :shocked2:
I guess so! I have dived waters these temperatures plenty when I was in Galapagos, and in southern Brazil, and oddly enough, in some places in Indonesia. But always in a wetsuit. What I think I'm doing is actually *earning* the drysuit rating I hold from Northern California diving (my coldest thus far). Getting the gear sorted out is the biggest part of that course.
 

buddhasummer

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It really never gets iffy at home, at least not in the way a drysuit would help :wink: Sometimes we do need a stock of dramamine and a rain jacket, though.

That's the strategy for tomorrow.

I guess so! I have dived waters these temperatures plenty when I was in Galapagos, and in southern Brazil, and oddly enough, in some places in Indonesia. But always in a wetsuit. What I think I'm doing is actually *earning* the drysuit rating I hold from Northern California diving (my coldest thus far). Getting the gear sorted out is the biggest part of that course.

Good luck with it all, I'm in the process of going down the dry suit path as we speak, so many choices options etc it's melting my brain.
 

dive_turkey

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Another vote for the Halo 3D. Warmest undies I've ever owned.

This is what I have, and love it. However, I still will wear a layer underneath the halo.
 

dbulmer

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Quero,
For 15C to 10C I'd go for 4th Element Arctics - it's not too bulky and has wicking properties. If that is not warm enough, layer it with a 4th element Xerotherm which you can use in your local waters. The nice thing about the 4 Element stuff is that it is washable and dries quickly.

My avatar is me wearing a drysuit in Egypt with a 4th element Xerotherm with a leaky suit.

I have used a Xerotherm with a drysuit in 18C and I was pretty warm - and I'm not packing too much lard.

Now the 4th Element stuff is pricey so if the price puts you off fair enough but definitely go for the Arctic socks they are really, really nice.
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/perdix-ai/

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