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Servicing your own regulators

Discussion in 'Regulators' started by Rick Warren, Feb 20, 2021.

Would you take a Manufacturer Approved Class on regulator servicing if offered?

Poll closed Feb 27, 2021.
  1. Yes

    92.3%
  2. No

    7.7%
  1. rsingler

    rsingler Scuba Instructor, Tinkerer in Brass Staff Member ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Napa, California
    5,880
    7,627
    You must be one of those guys that can look at both gauges at once. :rofl3:
    Screenshot_20210222-143203_Google.jpg
    I could never do it.
     
  2. JonathanD-Panda

    JonathanD-Panda Registered

    16
    1
    Might be a stupid question, but how do you guys source service manuals ? I have been looking for the Scubapro S620Ti service instructions absolutely everywhere and it's absolutely impossible to find anything ...
     
  3. RIHappyDiver

    RIHappyDiver ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Rhode Island
    519
    320
    Yeah, I was curious about the inline unit because I took the equipment class through DRIS last fall and the reg tech suggested that unit (they don’t carry it and he did not mention DGX by name). They were mentioning it in terms of verifying that a free flow was not creep and adjusting the 2nd stage orifice (if I’m remembering correctly) but I wasn’t sure if it was worth the $65.
     
  4. RIHappyDiver

    RIHappyDiver ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Rhode Island
    519
    320
    So, I just got my head wrapped around the much shorter than expected list of tools that @The Chairman put out and you go and throw in a magnetized helix! But seriously, is a magnehelic a must have, should have or comes in handy type of gauge? I’ll do a search for what it is so that you don’t have to explain.
    Thanks
     
  5. The Chairman

    The Chairman Chairman of the Board Staff Member

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Cave Country!
    62,355
    30,938
    It is not. It can be easily replaced with a bucket of water. That's all I have when I set up a reg in the field and it's what I teach my students to use. Crude? Perhaps. Effective? Oh my, yes! Easy to find on a remote island? Incredibly.
     
    RIHappyDiver likes this.
  6. Open Ocean Diver

    Open Ocean Diver ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Lauderdale-by-the-Sea
    1,310
    869
    Using a bucket of water is like using a rope to measure ship speed. Lol
     
  7. The Chairman

    The Chairman Chairman of the Board Staff Member

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Cave Country!
    62,355
    30,938
    They're analog! I found a picture of them in a pic I took of my sharpening station. They're side by side to the left.

    full?d=1614034068.jpg

    I never needed one. Usually, I can find a blow-up of a reg online through a simple Google Search. Often it takes me right back here. Scubapro Schematics diagrams - free download
     
  8. rsingler

    rsingler Scuba Instructor, Tinkerer in Brass Staff Member ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Napa, California
    5,880
    7,627
    As @The Chairman points out, the sink test works perfectly for folks on a budget.
    Here's a D400 cracking (starting to hiss) at 0.8" on a magnehelic.
    20201121_154025 1.jpg

    Magically, the diaphragm disc is now 0.8" under the surface of the water at the moment the reg starts to hiss.
    D400Cracking.png
    In other words, 0.8" of pressure (or 0.8" Water Column of "suck" on the mouthpiece) will open the valve. Most standard shaped regs work perfectly at a cracking effort of 1.1".

    On the other hand, a scratched old HVAC magnehelic for $60 on eBay was one of the nicest addons as I built out my tool list. But you can also use a piece of 1/4" clear tubing from Home Depot. Shape it into a "U", and tack it to a slanted board at a 19.5 degree angle (if you've got a table saw and some time) and add some water (or vodka if you want better responsiveness). Since sin (19.45) is 0.33, when the difference between the two meniscus' is 3" on the slanted board, your vertical rise of that water column is 1". Nice way to have a precise way to measure cracking when you can't quite tell how far the diaphragm is into the sink. Google "inclined water manometer".
     
    couv, lexvil and RIHappyDiver like this.
  9. Scuba Lawyer

    Scuba Lawyer Contributor

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Laguna Beach, California
    815
    2,492
    I use my Magnahelic all the time. It's pretty easy to tell if you have a decent cracking pressure by just breathing in off your reg, but many times I've found the cracking pressure adjusted too low and I get free-flow problems on the dive if i haven't detuned it somewhat. Nice optional gauge to have.

    Had to make my own DH mouthpiece attachment for the vacuum line. :)

    cRYXaX.jpg

    T7P2bT.jpg
     
    couv, RIHappyDiver and James79 like this.
  10. davehicks

    davehicks ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Seattle
    781
    736
    Yet the entire world was mapped and navigated centuries ago by ships using ropes with knots in them. It may not have the precision of GPS but it was good enough to find small islands across thousands of miles of ocean. Crude does not mean ineffective.
     

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