Scubapro Mk25: To DIN or not to DIN?

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Thunder Struck

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I'm looking at purchasing the Scubapro Mk25 w/ the G260 combo and I'm considering getting it as a DIN version instead of a yoke. I currently have a LP Steel 95 with the removable DIN converter in the valve. I'm also tempted with the purchase of a used Faber HP133 (3442psi) tank ($300 w/ current hydro). While the Mk25 yoke system is good to 230 bar/3335 psi (per the manual) the DIN is rated to 300 bar/4351 psi.

Much of my diving is either local lake diving where I'd either have a couple of my own tanks, or rental tanks that last I saw did have the removable DIN conversions. But I'd also be looking at dive trips to the SoCal boats from Long Beach (used to dive a fair bit on the Sun Diver pre-2001) as well as Ventura harbor. Back in the day I'd bring my trusty steel 95 along with me as the boats had compressors on board and it was great for seeking out scallops at 100'.

At this time I have no interest in the "VHP" 300 bar tanks.

However, I'm looking more towards Caribbean destinations (retirement plans for USVI in < 10 years as well as a current time share in St Martin) since the wife doesn't care for the cold coastal California waters. But these trips are realistically just once a year at a week long, but perhaps up to two trips in coming years. And if I can't get to the islands then Florida is the alternate.

As I've read, many of the operations in the Caribbean can't spell DIN let alone accommodate a DIN regulator. Also, I may run into rental tanks that don't have the removable DIN adapter. So this would introduce the need for the DIN to yoke adapter. But how intrusive on the back of the head are these adapters when used on the Scubapro Mk25? My BC is an XDeep Zen backplate and wing.

Currently not into or certified in wrecks or cave diving.

I get that the yoke adapter adds weight to traveling. However, I see Scubapro has a lightweight travel DIN to yoke which I'm guessing is aluminum. But even then, I've always brought the regs as part of the carry-on and weight generally isn't an issue there. My trips to SoCal would be via car so the weight isn't a concern there.

The DIN does interest me of late having recently witnessed an O-ring failure on a yoke system. It was on one of my daughter's certification dives and she had set everything up, they were doing the dive brief, when a sudden pop and the sound of lots of air escaping quickly got everybody's attention. It's funny, I never realized just how many cranks of the tank's valve handle it takes to close. Would have sucked had that happened under water. And while maybe it wouldn't have happened as it looked like the pressure of the tank had climbed quite a bit over 3000 psi having been in the Mohave sun and the 105+ ambient, and it was a shop rental tank with who knows what or how past users had done with or treated it, it was still a failure I'm thinking a DIN would not have had.
 

Searcaigh

Chromodoris gordonii
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I'm biased, go DIN.

Why do you have to carry the converter in your hand baggage?

I would also add why do you carry your regs as hand baggage too, there's plenty of debate in SB on that subject.
 

SlugMug

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I always DIN. It's lower-profile, can handle higher pressures, and is more convertible.

Once you go din, a couple other useful things to get:
The first lets you use yoke-tanks, such as if renting a tank. The second lets you convert any din-tank to a yoke-tank, for example, if the fill-station is yoke-only for some silly reason, or someone needs to borrow a tank. I toss them in my save-a-dive kit. I needed one today, because my pony-bottle-fill-adapter is yoke-only, and my tanks are din.

The only downside to din, is I seem to lose the o-rings on the din part of my regulators more often. So I carry a bunch of spares.

> But how intrusive on the back of the head are these adapters when used on the Scubapro Mk25? My BC is an XDeep Zen backplate and wing.

Probably not much worse than a yoke-regulator. I guess it depends on how frequently you'd be diving that way, but it's at least not that bad when I sidemount. I figure if I'm renting tanks and din isn't available, that I'm probably not doing any "extreme" diving.

I try to optimize for either (a) the most usual case or (b) the most challenging case. I think DIN is better for both, with (a) being diving at home, with your own tanks and equipment and (b) might be something like restriction-diving, which DIN is generally better for both.
 

Nemrod

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DIN is lower profile until you have to add a yoke converter. And it is true that DIN tanks can be difficult in much of the Carib and many other places. And even in Florida I have oft had difficulty removing the insert due to either corrosion or a valve that has been dropped and damaged enough to lock the insert but still allow a yoke to work.

You might consider going DIN but also buying the kit needed to convert the first stage to yoke configuration for destinations that are not DIN friendly. IMO, a yoke converter is useful and they do work but are not ideal compromising the supposed greater reliability of the DIN and adding a good deal of length to the regulator compared to a standard yoke assembly.

N
 

BoltSnap

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Din but buy the yoke connector to convert the first stage to yoke when needed. DIN is superior.
 

elan

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Its an easy decision:) If you dive your own tanks most of the time go DIN. If you travel a lot and dive remotely chances are you will be renting yoke tanks. So go with a yoke.

A couple of points based on what others said:

- while you can always convert yoke to DIN with an adapter the adapter adds bulk and height and it bumps your head I find

- do not worry about loosing DIN orings , whike many regs are designed that way that they are loose in the groove, SP did it right and they went with a more complex DIN oring retainer design but it holds it well in place as its a bit flared.

- while DIN is mechanically superior if you do recreational diving I hardly see its as the high priority item on the list. In a case of a catastrophic failure you either get on your buddy octo or slowly ascend to the surface. As part of my PADI training we were ascending to the surface from 90ft with no reg. Not a big deal. Carry few spare yoke orings with you when you go to remote locations.

You can also have a DIN and Yoke assemble and ask you shop to swap it before the trips.
 

O-ring

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DIN is lower profile until you have to add a yoke converter. And it is true that DIN tanks can be difficult in much of the Carib and many other places. And even in Florida I have oft had difficulty removing the insert due to either corrosion or a valve that has been dropped and damaged enough to lock the insert but still allow a yoke to work.

You might consider going DIN but also buying the kit needed to convert the first stage to yoke configuration for destinations that are not DIN friendly. IMO, a yoke converter is useful and they do work but are not ideal compromising the supposed greater reliability of the DIN and adding a good deal of length to the regulator compared to a standard yoke assembly.

N
This. Everything I have is DIN and has always been DIN, but the traveling and renting tanks or LOBs is a problem. I used the yoke converter for my regs for years, but was always annoyed by how long it made the first and how easy it was to hit your head on it. Eventually I bought the yoke bits and just flipped it back and forth for trips. That alleviates the long adapter problem, but still gets old after a few years. I eventually broke down and bought a separate reg for vacation/singles diving that just stays yoke.
 

Nemrod

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Back to the yoke converter, let me refine my statement, they work fine for the occasional use when you run into that tank that the insert is frozen in or the dive boat/shop rental tanks are all yoke valve tanks, but for an entire trip you will want a proper yoke regulator, not a converter, JMO.

James
 

Thunder Struck

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Thanks to all for the good info. How much further out does a DIN to yoke adapter push the reg?
 

O-ring

Beyond the Pale
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Thanks to all for the good info. How much further out does a DIN to yoke adapter push the reg?
Depends on the adapter, but now that you mention it I can't recall seeing one that was super compact or low profile. I have an old Apeks and it's significantly pushed out. Compare the below vs. a normal yoke version of the same reg.

img_7129.jpg
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/swift/

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