• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

Rust on Trilobite body

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by Raystafarian, Oct 14, 2018.

  1. Raystafarian

    Raystafarian Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Yokohama, Japan
    58
    20
    8
    I had some blades that rusted pretty good in my Eezycut trilobites about a year back, I ended up replacing the blades and being sure to do a thorough rinse and dry after dives, but the new blades are showing rust near the body (and in the body) where the rust was/is. I've tried cleaning the (is it plastic?) with baking soda and then vinegar with toothbrushes, but I haven't soaked the bodies trying to clean it off.

    How should I try to clean these? If I soak the tool in vinegar am I likely to damage it? I don't want to try to remove the rust, end up with pitting and then have the blades end up being loose in the tool.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. kelemvor

    kelemvor Big Fleshy Monster ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Largo, FL USA
    5,928
    3,127
    113
    That's a lot of damage!

    My trilobite blades also rusted but not nearly this bad. In my case, I cleaned it off with a wire brush and liquid dish detergent.

    Stainless blades would be a nice option for these cutting tools.
     
  3. divad

    divad Solo Diver

    7,880
    2,011
    113
    QUE?



    The grade of
    stainless steel used in the EEZYCUT TRILOBITE (440a) is known for its capacity to hold an extremely sharp edge, while having very good corrosive qualities. When the blade loses its edge or starts to corrode, you can easily put a new blade in, and yet again have the sharpest, cleanest cut in the water.
     
  4. kelemvor

    kelemvor Big Fleshy Monster ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Largo, FL USA
    5,928
    3,127
    113
    Huh.. I didn't think stainless steel would rust. Apparently I was wrong.
     
  5. divad

    divad Solo Diver

    7,880
    2,011
    113
    Stain-less steel. But, maybe there are bootleg replacement blades out there that suck-more.
     
  6. uncfnp

    uncfnp Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: North Carolina
    5,906
    4,176
    113
    Per the DGE website...

    “Note that the stainless steel for all this cutting tool is of a 400-series grade selected specifically to keep a sharp edge. After diving, you must rinse the diving tool in fresh water, dry it, and not replace it until the pouch is dry as well.”


    And seems the 400 series is made to hold an edge but is more susceptible to corrosion.


    400 Series Stainless Steel - Penn Stainless Products | Penn Stainless Products

    400 Series Stainless

    The 400 series group of stainless steels has an 11 percent chromium and 1-percent manganese increase, above the 300 series group. The 400 series is susceptible to rust and corrosion under some conditions. Heat-treating will harden the 400 series. The 400 series of stainless steels have higher carbon content, giving it a martensitic crystalline structure. This provides high strength and high wear resistance. Martensitic stainless steels aren’t as corrosion resistant as the austenitic types.
     
    kelemvor likes this.
  7. divad

    divad Solo Diver

    7,880
    2,011
    113
    Everyone should test their Trilobites, shears, BFK etc. once in a while. I just tried my Trilobite for the first time in several years (fresh water only) and it cut cave-string like it was warm butter. The disposable EMT shears, with the rust-out rivet should be tested more frequently. I have some old ones that will not cut paper.
     
    Schwob likes this.
  8. Nomad-Diver

    Nomad-Diver Solo Diver

    93
    34
    18
    I have found coating the entire blade, on both sides, with silicone grease helps avoid rust.
    Similarly rinsing it after every dive, and drying it in the upright position (so the water drips towards the base, rather than the enclosed 'cutting' area) also helps
     
  9. ReefGuy

    ReefGuy Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Punta Gorda, Fl.
    3,189
    704
    113
    If it were me, I'd just go at it with some steel wool or a green scrubby. I don't think you'll damage it, but if you do, they're only $20.
     
  10. Raystafarian

    Raystafarian Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Yokohama, Japan
    58
    20
    8
    Thanks all, yeah the blade still cuts no problem and these (replacement) blades came with the original tool when I purchased it in 2014, but I may as well just have a go with it and if need be get new ones, ha
     

Share This Page