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Masks : Function of nose-pockets ?

Discussion in 'Fins, Masks and Snorkels' started by Fishy, Mar 18, 2002.

  1. DivingGal

    DivingGal Divemaster

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    Gee thanks - I think. Alligators, diving, NetDoc and Walter...... I mean what more can a gal ask for? :D
     
  2. Walter

    Walter Instructor, Scuba

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    Gal, you forgot about the lions.

    Pug, that was funny! No threat to da Doc.

    Roak, I enjoyed the joke.
     
  3. DivingGal

    DivingGal Divemaster

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    Ah lions, gators, and divers oh my :D
     
  4. pipedope

    pipedope Great White

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    Think FLORIDA,

    MOSQUITOS, Gators and divers,,,, OH My!


    michael
     
  5. The Chairman

    The Chairman Chairman of the Board

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Cave Country!
    55,372
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    'cause while you MAY have lost a sharks tooth, at least you didn't lose your nose! :tease: (at least I am trying to put this puppy back on topic)
     
  6. Walter

    Walter Instructor, Scuba

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    Pipe,

    We saw lions.
     
  7. Uncle Pug

    Uncle Pug Swims with Orca ScubaBoard Supporter

    13,768
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    California, Stellar, or ?
     
  8. Walter

    Walter Instructor, Scuba

    18,583
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    African.
     
  9. pipedope

    pipedope Great White

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    Even though I am a cat person (see my profile) I generally prefer tigers to lions.
    Tigers usually love water and are good swimmers.

    Lions usually only go to the water for a drink.

    michael
     
  10. vicky

    vicky Nassau Grouper

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    Actually it is not a joke but an urban legend:

    ****************************************************
    The following concerns a question in a physics degree exam at the University of Copenhagen:

    "Describe how to determine the height of a skyscraper with a barometer."

    One student replied:

    "You tie a long piece of string to the neck of the barometer, then lower the barometer from the roof of the skyscraper to the ground. The length of the string plus the length of the barometer will equal the height of the building."

    This highly original answer so incensed the examiner that the student was failed immediately. The student appealed on the grounds that his answer was indisputably correct, and the university appointed an independent arbiter to decide the case.

    The arbiter judged that the answer was indeed correct, but did not display any noticeable knowledge of physics. To resolve the problem it was decided to call the student in and allow him six minutes in which to provide a verbal answer that showed at least a minimal familiarity with the basic principles of physics. For five minutes the student sat in silence, forehead creased in thought. The arbiter reminded him that time was running out, to which the student replied that he had several extremely relevant answers, but couldn't make up his mind which to use. On being advised to hurry up the student replied as follows:

    "Firstly, you could take the barometer up to the roof of the skyscraper, drop it over the edge, and measure the time it takes to reach the ground. The height of the building can then be worked out from the formula H = 0.5g x t squared. But bad luck on the barometer."

    "Or if the sun is shining you could measure the height of the barometer, then set it on end and measure the length of its shadow. Then you measure the length of the skyscraper's shadow, and thereafter it is a simple matter of proportional arithmetic to work out the height of the skyscraper."

    "But if you wanted to be highly scientific about it, you could tie a short piece of string to the barometer and swing it like a pendulum, first at ground level and then on the roof of the skyscraper. The height is worked out by the difference in the gravitational restoring force T =2 pi sqr root (l /g)."

    "Or if the skyscraper has an outside emergency staircase, it would be easier to walk up it and mark off the height of the skyscraper in barometer lengths, then add them up." "If you merely wanted to be boring and orthodox about it, of course, you could use the barometer to measure the air pressure on the roof of the skyscraper and on the ground, and convert the difference in millibars into feet to give the height of the building."

    "But since we are constantly being exhorted to exercise independence of mind and apply scientific methods, undoubtedly the best way would be to knock on the janitor's door and say to him 'If you would like a nice new barometer, I will give you this one if you tell me the height of this skyscraper'."

    The student was Niels Bohr, the only Dane to win the Nobel Prize for Physics
    ****************************************************

    So far for the story and now for its morale, which applies to scubadiving instruction and education too:

    The obvious moral here is that education should not consist merely of stuffing students' heads full of information and formulae to be memorized by rote and regurgitated upon demand, but of teaching students how to think and solve problems using whatever tools are available. In the mangled words of a familiar phrase, students should be educated in a way that enables them to figure out their own ways of catching fish, not simply taught a specific method of fishing.
     

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