Has anyone taken an Apple Watch to depth?

Please register or login

Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

Benefits of registering include

  • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
  • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
  • You can make this box go away

Joining is quick and easy. Log in or Register now!

nippurmagnum

Contributor
Messages
348
Reaction score
412
Location
Washington DC metro
# of dives
500 - 999
Apple says my Apple Watch SE is water resistant to 50 meters. It also says the watch can survive being in sea water. But Apple says the watch should not be used for diving. So either Apple is wrong about the claim of 50 meter water resistance, or it’s wrong about the claim that it should not be used for diving. There is no purpose to 50 meter water resistance OTHER than diving.

So, has anyone braver than me put his/her Apple Watch to the test? How deep did you go, did you have any issues with the watch afterwards, and which of Apple’s two mutually exclusive claims is BS?

Mind you, I’m not asking whether anyone NEEDS to take an Apple Watch diving. Only whether it would be safe to do so if the spirit moved one to do so.
 

Marie13

Great Lakes Mermaid
ScubaBoard Supporter
Messages
10,424
Reaction score
9,258
Location
Great Lakes
# of dives
200 - 499
I have one friend that killed his Apple Watch by taking it diving by accident under his drysuit.
 

Nemrod

ScubaBoard Supporter
ScubaBoard Supporter
Messages
12,522
Reaction score
2,877
Location
Dixie/High Plains
Dive watches, the real ones, are generally at least 150 meters in olden times and now preferably 300 meters or more with some to considerably more, static. There is dynamic and static water resistance. The depth given for most dive watches and for the Apple would be static, no movement. Diving is dynamic with the watch exposed to pressure changes, shock, temperature and motion. The 50 meters of the Apple watch will result in a non-functional i-device, guaranteed. The 150 meters would be the minimum acceptable rating for a dive watch.

N
 

O-ring

Beyond the Pale
ScubaBoard Supporter
Messages
5,585
Reaction score
644
Location
USA
Prob going to get a lot of anecdotal reports on this one, so may as well add one. I was on a LOB a few months ago with a guy who wore one on every dive of the trip (max depths prob around 110' or so). He had some kind of fitness app or something and wanted to monitor his heart rate while diving. I buddied with him on one of the dives and at one point he asked me if I thought it was a good idea or not. I told him I had never owned an Apple watch so had no idea, but that I flooded a bunch of the old two button Ironman and Gshocks we used to use to time decompression stops when tables were a thing and those were rated 2-4x deeper for "water resistance" than his Apple watch (and were also a lot cheaper so not as big of a loss). I also told him that I once flooded an automatic diving watch that was rated for 600 meters and cost about 20-30x what an Apple watch cost on a wakeboarding and water skiing trip. My advice was to not trust the rating and leave it on the boat, but he dove with it anyway and it was still working at the end of the week.
 

Jcp2

Literally virtually diving
ScubaBoard Supporter
Messages
1,781
Reaction score
2,028
Location
Pandora
Even 100 m rating is not sufficient for a manufacturer to qualify a watch as a dive watch. I take my Casio G Shock, rated at 100 m to dive, knowing that it could flood, but it only cost me $60. There are others in the same line rated for 200 m, but they are in the $250 and up range, which would be a low end used dive computer by then.

All About Watches and Water Resistance
 

Kimela

Contributor
Messages
2,677
Reaction score
3,945
Location
Missouri
# of dives
200 - 499
I can't imagine the generation watch I have would be water resistant. It has that little crown that you push to activate the app menu and I assume that's where water would get in. I'll have to look up the SE. Maybe it's different?
 

Jcp2

Literally virtually diving
ScubaBoard Supporter
Messages
1,781
Reaction score
2,028
Location
Pandora
I can't imagine the generation watch I have would be water resistant. It has that little crown that you push to activate the app menu and I assume that's where water would get in. I'll have to look up the SE. Maybe it's different?
The whole face is touch sensitive so it might be even more than just moisture, but also pressure. Hence the drysuit watch failure.
 

Lorenzoid

ScubaBoard Supporter
Staff member
ScubaBoard Supporter
Messages
10,868
Reaction score
7,792
Location
USA
# of dives
I just don't log dives
Even 100 m rating is not sufficient for a manufacturer to qualify a watch as a dive watch. I take my Casio G Shock, rated at 100 m to dive, knowing that it could flood, but it only cost me $60. There are others in the same line rated for 200 m, but they are in the $250 and up range, which would be a low end used dive computer by then.

All About Watches and Water Resistance

Exactly. Here's a slightly more flippant take on these depth ratings: What Your Watch Water Resistance Numbers Really Mean
 

O-ring

Beyond the Pale
ScubaBoard Supporter
Messages
5,585
Reaction score
644
Location
USA
Even 100 m rating is not sufficient for a manufacturer to qualify a watch as a dive watch. I take my Casio G Shock, rated at 100 m to dive, knowing that it could flood, but it only cost me $60. There are others in the same line rated for 200 m, but they are in the $250 and up range, which would be a low end used dive computer by then.

All About Watches and Water Resistance
Yup.. we used to plan on a new one every season or two. It was the price you paid for having a stopwatch on your wrist at depth.
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/perdix-ai/

Top Bottom