For divers contemplating using a long hose configuration

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crofrog

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Well I will admit that I dont do S drills.

But I imagine that a 40' hose would work fine in that drill (esp if youre not actually mouthing that donated reg). In any case, Im still choosing the convenience of a 40' hose.
Staying in trim and because of that swimming anywhere other than up with a 40" hose is really difficult compared to a 7' hose. Choosing equipment for "convenience" over in-water safety and performance is a philosophy that I can't support.
 

dflaher

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Staying in trim and because of that swimming anywhere other than up with a 40" hose is really difficult compared to a 7' hose
I don't want to derail this thread, but can you explain the trim benefit of a long hose? Not challenging, it's just that i have never heard that before and would like to understand.
 

BlueTrin

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I don't want to derail this thread, but can you explain the trim benefit of a long hose? Not challenging, it's just that i have never heard that before and would like to understand.
I think he’s saying that it’s unlikely you’ll stay horizontal while giving your octo, because it’s short, so you are likely to go vertical or inclined so you can give it.
 

Brett Hatch

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Yeah, I think that's right. If you've ever donated or received a 3' - 4' hose and then tried to go anywhere but up, you will have noticed that it is quite difficult. The length works for a face-to-face, vertical-trim ascent, and doesn't work well for anything else. If you are in an OOG emergency, in an environment with no overhead, that is perfectly sufficient.

By the way, if you are diving under boat traffic, a longhose will allow you to more easily swim sideways until you can safely ascend. And there's a good, obvious reason for this: diving under moving boat traffic is an overhead environment. People often don't treat it that way, and will dive it with insufficient training and gear, but that isn't very safe IMHO.
 

dflaher

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Thanks @bluetand @Brett Hatch. That makes perfect sense to me. I thought that @crofrog 's comment was in a non-sharing scenario.

I see a lot of good reasons for the long hose config, but I haven't jumped ship yet. I'd need a long(er) hose, necklace, and probably a new alternate 2nd stage (mine is currently a puck style). Anything else?
 

Barefoot_Lawyer

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Thanks @bluetand @Brett Hatch. That makes perfect sense to me. I thought that @crofrog 's comment was in a non-sharing scenario.

I see a lot of good reasons for the long hose config, but I haven't jumped ship yet. I'd need a long(er) hose, necklace, and probably a new alternate 2nd stage (mine is currently a puck style). Anything else?

Assuming you have a real regulator and not a spare air and you are comfortable breathing off of it at depth when you donate your primary to someone else, You’ll need a long (7’) LP hose, a short (22”-24”) LP hose, and about 2 feet of 1/8” shock cord/bungee to make a necklace with the video OP posted (although I don’t put the sliding grommet like the video - just size it and be done).

If your “octo” reg is not something you want to be breathing off of in a high stress / high work effort situation at your maximum depths, then getting something better would be a good idea.

The hoses are only like $50 so maybe just change those and tie yourself a necklace and try it out on a shallow dive with your current backup reg before you spend a lot of cash.

EDIT: oh, and you will need to tie a bolt snap on you your primary hose about one hand length away from the regulator so you can clip it to your right chest D Ring - this is helpful so you don’t drag it through the rocks/sand/mud when it isn’t in your mouth. You can buy Stainless Steel ones at any hardware store -
 

crofrog

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Thanks @bluetand @Brett Hatch. That makes perfect sense to me. I thought that @crofrog 's comment was in a non-sharing scenario.

I see a lot of good reasons for the long hose config, but I haven't jumped ship yet. I'd need a long(er) hose, necklace, and probably a new alternate 2nd stage (mine is currently a puck style). Anything else?
No I was talking about for OOG / air sharing ascent and exit.

The other thing is something to retain the long hose, either a long hose stick, light canister, weight pocket, or just tuck it into the webbing.
 

BlueTrin

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Thanks @bluetand @Brett Hatch. That makes perfect sense to me. I thought that @crofrog 's comment was in a non-sharing scenario.

I see a lot of good reasons for the long hose config, but I haven't jumped ship yet. I'd need a long(er) hose, necklace, and probably a new alternate 2nd stage (mine is currently a puck style). Anything else?
I’d say you need proper training as well, there are few things you can get wrong, for example:

- it is imperative you deploy the long hose as part of the buddy check or at some point before to descend

- when diving with someone who is not using a long hose, you need to explain what will happen in case of OOA

- the long hose should always be stowed last because you can trap it with one of the following

- you can trap it with the secondary necklace, this happens typically when someone forgot to put the necklace and then don the necklace during the buddy check

- you can trap it with the canister torch cable, this happens if you didn’t put the long hose last or if you put it such as you can trap it while clipping the torch to your right d-ring

- you can trap the long hose with the drysuit hose, this happens when someone forgot to connect the drysuit and connects it quickly during the buddy check, can happen after inflating a DSMB with the drysuit hose too

- you can trap it with the belt, this happens when someone readjusts something and reclip the belt.

Basically … always stow the long hose last after you have done everything else, if you adjust anything, check the long hose again 😂
 

dflaher

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you will need to tie a bolt snap on you your primary hose about one hand length away from the regulator so you can clip it to your right chest D Ring - this is helpful so you don’t drag it through the rocks/sand/mud when it isn’t in your mouth
I actually have a boltsnap on my 40" now, but that is to attach it to my chest D-ring while on the boat day during an SI...so that my 2nd stage doesn't drag on the floor.

Probably a dumb quesrion but why wouldn't the primary be either in my mouth or in the mouth of an OOA diver?
 

BlueTrin

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I actually have a boltsnap on my 40" now, but that is to attach it to my chest D-ring while on the boat day during an SI...so that my 2nd stage doesn't drag on the floor.

Probably a dumb quesrion but why wouldn't the primary be either in my mouth or in the mouth of an OOA diver?
- If you switch to a stage cylinder

- if you switch to your own secondary (if your had to shutdown one valve while diving doubles or if your regulator does not work)

- also the long hose needs to be clipped when your kit is assembled in your car or on the boat, you usually roll the hose around itself and clip through the middle so it does not lay on the floor

When you put the bolt snap, it should be in a place where you can still breathe from the reg on the clipped hose by pulling on the reg, just in case you happen to need it …
 
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