Who has had to bailout?

Have you ever had to bailout?

  • Yes, due to a flooded loop

    Votes: 14 20.6%
  • No, never

    Votes: 26 38.2%
  • Yes, due to failed electronics

    Votes: 5 7.4%
  • Yes, due to loss of gas in the rebreather

    Votes: 3 4.4%
  • Yes, for another reason not listed

    Votes: 26 38.2%

  • Total voters
    68

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wedivebc

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Once for extruded O-ring on a Sport Kiss, and once for CO2 breakthrough from using poor quality sorb. Medical sorb != diving sorb.
 

TecGirl

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That's exactly it. I had one due to an improperly sized neck seal paired with a bit too much exertion 30 minutes into a cave at 160'. And that was on OC. It's very much possible. It was a slow build. Feeling a little more narced than I felt like I should have on 18/45 initially. Then I was consistently just a bit behind on my buoyancy. Then I started feeling overworked and winded. By the time the anxiety and creeping panic/dread started to set in, it was hitting hard. Ended up cutting the neck seal and flooding the suit, but it took a couple minutes to get my breathing under control to the point that I felt comfortable moving towards the door and another 15 or so minutes after that to get back to baseline RMV. I had to take off my hood, as any pressure on my neck felt unbearable. It was probably psychological, but I was at a point where I was feeling spasms in my throat, like I physically couldn't breathe enough. Easily the scariest diving experience of my life. I remember having to talk to myself mentally when it was hitting hard and tell myself to focus on getting my breathing stabilized before anything else or I wasn't going to make it. 0/10, would not recommend. That said, it was a really valuable learning experience in a lot of ways. I'm hyper aware of all the little things that led up to that now and I feel reasonably confident that I'd pick up on a CO2 hit on the loop a bit earlier than I otherwise would have without that experience.

yes!! I have to say it was the most horrible feeling I’ve ever felt well Diving for me. I felt like I was breathing normal but I was told later that I was hyperventilating. the funny thing is I had no idea how hard I was breathing
 

TecGirl

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By any chance that really dusty stuff that turns pink? (Grace Sodasorb, I think it was called). That stuff had bigger grains, was soft and very dusty. Nasty dust when packing - which I always did outside.

My only breakthrough happened with that stuff many years ago. Since I switched to the Sofnolime which has much smaller grain size and is harder and much less dusty and have not had a breakthrough since.
I think it was ... We got a batch of it that was already a bit damp and was really difficult to pack no matter what you did... moved over to Sofnolime & so far that hasn’t happened again
 

wedivebc

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yes!! I have to say it was the most horrible feeling I’ve ever felt well Diving for me. I felt like I was breathing normal but I was told later that I was hyperventilating. the funny thing is I had no idea how hard I was breathing
That is interesting. Many report high levels of anxiety when experiencing high CO2 levels but my experience was similar to yours. I felt only slight discomfort but my buddy was concerned about my behaviour. I was still somewhat in denial about what happened except it was all caught on camera and although not as dramatic as the Sky News Co2 event (every rebreather diver should see this ) my behaviour was anything but normal.
 

TecGirl

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That is interesting. Many report high levels of anxiety when experiencing high CO2 levels but my experience was similar to yours. I felt only slight discomfort but my buddy was concerned about my behaviour. I was still somewhat in denial about what happened except it was all caught on camera and although not as dramatic as the Sky News Co2 event (every rebreather diver should see this ) my behaviour was anything but normal.
 

TecGirl

Captain
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Kailua Kona, Hawaii
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5000 - ∞
That is interesting. Many report high levels of anxiety when experiencing high CO2 levels but my experience was similar to yours. I felt only slight discomfort but my buddy was concerned about my behaviour. I was still somewhat in denial about what happened except it was all caught on camera and although not as dramatic as the Sky News Co2 event (every rebreather diver should see this ) my behaviour was anything but normal.
 

TecGirl

Captain
Messages
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Location
Kailua Kona, Hawaii
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That is interesting. Many report high levels of anxiety when experiencing high CO2 levels but my experience was similar to yours. I felt only slight discomfort but my buddy was concerned about my behaviour. I was still somewhat in denial about what happened except it was all caught on camera and although not as dramatic as the Sky News Co2 event (every rebreather diver should see this ) my behaviour was anything but normal.


Glad you made it back OK!
 

jale

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"bailouted" 3 times.
.many years ago on a homemade tube rb. The single strangely triangular shaped first OSTC cell monitor died at 40M. OC and went back to the unit at 6M.
.in a cave with a Flex. Feeling the unit becoming more and more negative and having difficulties to breath till I realised I had a leak...was on the way out not far from the light...
.jumping from a boat, membrane of the adv folding at entering water, instant total flooding, sorb in the mouth but luckily didn't swallow and rinced immediatly. Still bad taste for the whole day.
Take away: always, always, always monitor everything...
 

Shasta_man

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Tangent observation: The video showed referred to a concept we dont talk about which might be described as a reverse trust me situation where the leader of the dive is having trouble but none of the other divers feel they should take charge of him to get him to the surface. Kevin's narration/discussion of the situation might itself indicate why that was happening because he talked about not recognizing the severity of the problem. Of course during the dive he was compromised but even in the discussion he was saying he felt he was in control.

Short description is that people who act confidentially can be their own worst enemy when confronting an issue that compromises their ability to think. That is probably not a particular revelation but that is something for people in that situation to think about as well as people who try to help.
 
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