Who has had to bailout?

Have you ever had to bailout?

  • Yes, due to a flooded loop

    Votes: 14 20.6%
  • No, never

    Votes: 26 38.2%
  • Yes, due to failed electronics

    Votes: 5 7.4%
  • Yes, due to loss of gas in the rebreather

    Votes: 3 4.4%
  • Yes, for another reason not listed

    Votes: 26 38.2%

  • Total voters
    68

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rddvet

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Can you say anything more about the co2 effect? Always interesting to hear first(ish) hand accounts :)

I took a mild hit on a unit I was training on. The unit in particular has a crappy ADV that fires at the worst possible times. I was having some mask issues due to my beard and had to do a lot of clearing. That would then fire the adv way too easily. So it was a constant battle of fighting for ideal loop volume, which led to not cycling breaths as well as one would hope though the unit. I was in the process of doing a skill while fighting a leaking mask and the adv, when all of a sudden it felt like I got hit in the back of the head with a sledgehammer. It was a horrible instantaneous headache. Then suddenly my breathing rate started going up, but I was conscious of it and trying to slow it down. I never felt panicked or got panicked breathing. As hard as I would tell myself to slow my breathing it wouldn't happen and it kept going up. I never felt panicked, but I felt very uneasy and unsettled and felt I wanted the dive to be over. I thumbed it and exited. We were in the very front part of a cavern, so it was 20 seconds to the 20 foot mark where I could flush the hell out of the unit with oxygen. When we surfaced I breathed oxygen a while longer which helped make the headache go away.
 

TecGirl

Captain
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Kailua Kona, Hawaii
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Yes, it happen
- Hypercapnia due to scrubber malfunction....An extremely unpleasant feeling
- got a hits of pure O2 in the loop at 90 feet/oxygen solenoid malfunction... It all of a sudden started firing continuously. I started to feel nauseous and immediately switched my back up OC bailout cylinder just as my HUD lit up like a Christmas tree
 

stuartv

Seeking the Light
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Yes, it happen
- Hypercapnia due to scrubber malfunction....An extremely unpleasant feeling
- got a hits of pure O2 in the loop at 90 feet/oxygen solenoid malfunction... It all of a sudden started firing continuously. I started to feel nauseous and immediately switched my back up OC bailout cylinder just as my HUD lit up like a Christmas tree

Just curious, what unit(s) were you diving when those things happened?
 

rjack321

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Just curious, what unit(s) were you diving when those things happened?
If her profile is to be believed, a Prism.
 

TecGirl

Captain
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Dumb question maybe, does the heart rate increase when getting a C02 hit?
To me it just felt like I could not get enough gas to breathe and anxiety. I actually tore/ broke the neoprene the neck of my wet suit when I had breakthrough on my scrubber... they kept feeling like it was too tight on my neck and I couldn’t get enough gas in my lungs . I was definitely breathing too fast.And that was only a small amount of CO2 at a shallow depth within 10 minutes of the dive starting.
 

helodriver87

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To me it just felt like I could not get enough gas to breathe and anxiety. I actually tore/ broke the neoprene the neck of my wet suit when I had breakthrough on my scrubber... they kept feeling like it was too tight on my neck and I couldn’t get enough gas in my lungs . I was definitely breathing too fast.And that was only a small amount of CO2 at a shallow depth within 10 minutes of the dive starting.

That's exactly it. I had one due to an improperly sized neck seal paired with a bit too much exertion 30 minutes into a cave at 160'. And that was on OC. It's very much possible. It was a slow build. Feeling a little more narced than I felt like I should have on 18/45 initially. Then I was consistently just a bit behind on my buoyancy. Then I started feeling overworked and winded. By the time the anxiety and creeping panic/dread started to set in, it was hitting hard. Ended up cutting the neck seal and flooding the suit, but it took a couple minutes to get my breathing under control to the point that I felt comfortable moving towards the door and another 15 or so minutes after that to get back to baseline RMV. I had to take off my hood, as any pressure on my neck felt unbearable. It was probably psychological, but I was at a point where I was feeling spasms in my throat, like I physically couldn't breathe enough. Easily the scariest diving experience of my life. I remember having to talk to myself mentally when it was hitting hard and tell myself to focus on getting my breathing stabilized before anything else or I wasn't going to make it. 0/10, would not recommend. That said, it was a really valuable learning experience in a lot of ways. I'm hyper aware of all the little things that led up to that now and I feel reasonably confident that I'd pick up on a CO2 hit on the loop a bit earlier than I otherwise would have without that experience.
 

sunnyboy

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That was a Prism Topaz... Got a bad batch of CO2 scrubber material

By any chance that really dusty stuff that turns pink? (Grace Sodasorb, I think it was called). That stuff had bigger grains, was soft and very dusty. Nasty dust when packing - which I always did outside.

My only breakthrough happened with that stuff many years ago. Since I switched to the Sofnolime which has much smaller grain size and is harder and much less dusty and have not had a breakthrough since.
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/perdix-ai/

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