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which motor

Discussion in 'Compressors, Boosters & Blending Systems' started by abyss_scuba, Aug 15, 2017.

  1. abyss_scuba

    abyss_scuba Dive Shop

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Pleasantville, NY
    373
    210
    I have a Poseidon 135pfu with a Leeson motor. Today I heard a bunch grinding noise and the motor stopped turning. I can pick up a Dayton at Grainger. Does anyone know anything about this motor. I will wait if I have to for a Leeson to be delivered. Any recommendations. I do need to get back up and running real quick so I may have to take what I can get.

    As always thanks for your help.I do have a call in to Sheldon as I know many ppl will say call him first.
     
  2. CraigAClark

    CraigAClark Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: South Florida
    569
    32
    Is there a catalog number on the name plate or data like RPM, frame size, shaft size, 50 or 60hz, voltage, phase and FLA?
     
  3. tbone1004

    tbone1004 Technical Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Greenville, South Carolina, United States
    18,657
    11,116
    @abyss_scuba basically what @CraigAClark said. Most motors are interchangeable. You need same or similar RPM and shaft size unless you want a new pulley, same frame size unless you want to get the drill out, and the same electrical requirements. If they are the same, as most industrial motor mfg's have interchangeable motors, then it is plug and play with no concerns to be had. If any of the above are different, than you have some research to do but it will be easier to just replace it with an identical or at least identical spec motor
     
  4. cool_hardware52

    cool_hardware52 Dive Equipment Manufacturer

    7,582
    1,790
    As Craig noted motors will have a tag or name plate attached, usually via rivets. The key info you need is the "NEMA" frame number. Examples would be "184T" or "215" etc. There are literally 100's of different "frame numbers"

    The frame number is an industry standard that specifies a long list of details, size, diameter of the shaft, end condition of the shaft, i.e. threaded, keyway, size of key, the mounting dimensions, the location of the junction box, rotation, etc. The list can be very long.

    As long as your replacement motor has the same frame number as the motor that failed it should "bolt up" and be made to work.

    WW Graingers is a huge vendor of Electric Motors, and Dayton is their "house brand" Dayton is fine. There are better quality motors made, but I'd have no qualms about using a Dayton. I have many Dayton motors (I own a machine shop, it's not uncommon for a single "machine" to have 4-5-6- motors, fans, coolant pumps, hydraulic pumps, axis motors, spindle motors, chip conveyors etc. I live in a sea of electric motors)

    Modern induction motors are pretty simple, rugged and reliable devices. I would not rule out Ebay if I had the Nema Frame number.

    From the description of your failure I suspect the bearing in your original motor failed. That's often a result of too much belt tension. Any thing you can do to move the pulley (assuming a belt drive) closer to the face of the motor (may not be possible, but see what you can do) will help. So will new belts, good alignment between the pulleys and good clean sheaves on both the driving and driven end.

    Belt tension is a balancing act. You need enough to avoid slippage, and not too much which damages bearings.

    Keep a close eye on a new belt as they need frequent adjustment during the initial break in period.

    Gates Corp publishes a lot of good info on the care and feeding of belt drive systems.

    Good luck,

    Tobin
     
    2airishuman likes this.
  5. 2airishuman

    2airishuman Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Greater Minnesota
    2,633
    1,890
    It is also be possible to replace the motor bearing. It's an easy, inexpensive fix, and saves you the hassle of removing and replacing the motor, and the expense of a replacement.
     
    cool_hardware52 likes this.
  6. cool_hardware52

    cool_hardware52 Dive Equipment Manufacturer

    7,582
    1,790
    Great idea

    In many cases bearing replacement is cheap and easy, but doing so requires R&R on the motor and any pulleys, and often requires access to a press and the necessary pilots, supports, etc.

    If the motor in question is large and $$ it may be worth finding the local electric motor repair station.

    Tobin
     
  7. 2airishuman

    2airishuman Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Greater Minnesota
    2,633
    1,890
    On most installations, with most motors, you leave the frame and stator on the equipment, but remove the pulley and key. Then you remove the four tie bolts. The front (shaft end) faceplate pulls off the motor, maybe with some gentle prying, usually leaving the bearing on the shaft, or you may get the rotor and possibly back bearing along with it. In any event, you remove the bearings using whatever means necessary and clean up the shaft with some emery cloth if needed. New bearings are a snug fit but typically not a press fit.

    I used to operate a farm. We had a good deal of equipment outdoors, and due to the exposure to weather, I replaced a lot of bearings, in everything. With motors usually the bearings failed, not the stators. With fractional HP motors I kept the most common bearings in stock (almost all the 5/8" shaft fractional HP motors use the same ones) and so bearing replacement saved me a trip to town. For larger motors, the cost savings was significant. Anything around 5 hp and up will typically call out the bearing number on the nameplate, which makes it easier, but if not it's easy to match up a suitable replacement by shape and size alone.
     
  8. cool_hardware52

    cool_hardware52 Dive Equipment Manufacturer

    7,582
    1,790
    If nothing else Farmers are pragmatic. I grew up in the construction business and have often commented that growing up in a small to medium sized construction business was about as close as one could get to growing up on a farm without living in the country. Both require a solution now, not a week from now. Both require making do with what you have on hand, not what you'd like to have or what the manual says you need, both reward pragmatism.

    Much respect for farmers.

    Tobin
     
  9. CraigAClark

    CraigAClark Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: South Florida
    569
    32
    When you do get a replacement, be sure to pay attention to the rotation and wire the leads accordingly. Most single phase motors require you to swap wires #5 and #8 to change rotation. On a Bauer U-10 and J-II, the rotation is CCW facing the shaft end of the motor. I'd imagine your unit is probably the same.
     
  10. cool_hardware52

    cool_hardware52 Dive Equipment Manufacturer

    7,582
    1,790

    Good catch.

    For many single phase motors changing rotation is impossible, that makes your advice even more valuable.

    One of the many advantages of 3 Phase is the ease with which motor rotation can be reversed, but that's not the case with single phase.

    Tobin
     

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