"Third" Powerhouse Cutting Tool (after 2 Line Cutters)

Please register or login

Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

Benefits of registering include

  • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
  • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
  • You can make this box go away

Joining is quick and easy. Log in or Register now!

SlugLife

Contributor
Messages
1,813
Reaction score
1,775
Location
Texas
# of dives
I just don't log dives
I currently have two line-cutters from DGX, including the ceramic one and titanium one. I love having these cutters, because they're easy to handle, not-drop, no stabby end, and use practically zero space on my harness. I'll probably swap out the ceramic for a 2nd titanium one, because the feature of opening up and having a serrated side is pretty awesome for cutting ropes.

Anyway, I'm looking at options for a 3rd cutting tool. Perhaps something more of a power-house even if is little bulkier. If it's bulky enough, it might be clipped to my tank (sidemount), but I've been thinking about various ideas like folding-saws, bolt-cutters, etc. Preferably stainless steel or other non-rusting material. I can easily make a sheathe for anything, so I'll worry about that part. I could potentially even swap out the device depending on the environment, obstacles, or likely things I feel like cutting (rope, branches, steel fishing line).

Bonus Questions: For each device, also feel free to also include.
  • What the device is great for cutting, or potential other uses.
  • Any drawbacks or limitations. (what it can't cut, bulk, stabbing-hazard, etc)
  • Recommended brand/model.
 

Eric802

Contributor
Messages
372
Reaction score
556
Location
Dallas
# of dives
25 - 49
Is there some type of diving you're doing that could potentially require bolt cutters or a folding saw? If you've got a couple line cutters, I would think the other logical thing to add would be shears.
 
OP
SlugLife

SlugLife

Contributor
Messages
1,813
Reaction score
1,775
Location
Texas
# of dives
I just don't log dives
Is there some type of diving you're doing that could potentially require bolt cutters or a folding saw? If you've got a couple line cutters, I would think the other logical thing to add would be shears.

I do have some use-cases in mind, but this topic is deliberately open-ended, because I want creative responses. I'm also not doing anything too crazy yet either, nor encountered anything life-threatening my titanium-line-cutter can't handle.

---

But if we're to talk about my specific use-cases, in priority-order:
  • High: Efficiently/quickly cut boating-rope. (faster than titanium line-cutter)
  • Medium: Ability to cut tree-branches, such as river-dives.
  • Low: Ability to cut steel fishing-leader-line.
I'd say a rope-cutter might be my first focus. The other day I retrieved several boat anchors, and used the titanium-line-cutter, and it did well. In a rope-emergency, it's plenty adequate, compact, opens wide enough, and takes 2-20 sawing-motions depending on the rope. However, if doing an anchor retrieval, it would be nice to just snip through the rope like butter.

I'll probably throw EMT shears in my pouch. Although I'd like a more serious tool, perhaps something like utility/construction shears, kitchen-shears, mini-bolt-cutter, etc. The difficult part is usually finding something that can withstand water, and not rust too quickly. Here's a few things I've been looking at as an example, more research is needed on a few of these items for rust-resistance, cutting-width, etc:

 

Gone for diving

Contributor
Messages
991
Reaction score
667
Location
Ont
Better than those emt shears..
I use it alot for recovering fishing lures
 

Attachments

  • 20220706_114759.jpg
    20220706_114759.jpg
    96.3 KB · Views: 64

tursiops

Marine Scientist and Master Instructor
ScubaBoard Supporter
Scuba Instructor
Messages
15,862
Reaction score
15,339
Location
U.S. East Coast
# of dives
2500 - 4999
I do have some use-cases in mind, but this topic is deliberately open-ended, because I want creative responses. I'm also not doing anything too crazy yet either, nor encountered anything life-threatening my titanium-line-cutter can't handle.

---

But if we're to talk about my specific use-cases, in priority-order:
  • High: Efficiently/quickly cut boating-rope. (faster than titanium line-cutter)
  • Medium: Ability to cut tree-branches, such as river-dives.
  • Low: Ability to cut steel fishing-leader-line.
I'd say a rope-cutter might be my first focus. The other day I retrieved several boat anchors, and used the titanium-line-cutter, and it did well. In a rope-emergency, it's plenty adequate, compact, opens wide enough, and takes 2-20 sawing-motions depending on the rope. However, if doing an anchor retrieval, it would be nice to just snip through the rope like butter.

I'll probably throw EMT shears in my pouch. Although I'd like a more serious tool, perhaps something like utility/construction shears, kitchen-shears, mini-bolt-cutter, etc. The difficult part is usually finding something that can withstand water, and not rust too quickly. Here's a few things I've been looking at as an example, more research is needed on a few of these items for rust-resistance, cutting-width, etc:

Beware: many tools may be advertised as "titanium" and actually have some titanium parts, but still have mild steel components,. not even stainless.
 

Vicko

Contributor
Messages
703
Reaction score
895
Location
Croatia
# of dives
0 - 24
A high quality sharp knife, this will go trough any smaller tree branches, copper or thin steel cables (like the ones used on fishing lures)
Why someone would want to cut those things is beyond me, but nice to know you can.
 

Attachments

  • 1657124431134.png
    1657124431134.png
    292.4 KB · Views: 60
OP
SlugLife

SlugLife

Contributor
Messages
1,813
Reaction score
1,775
Location
Texas
# of dives
I just don't log dives
Better than those emt shears..
I use it alot for recovering fishing lures
Found them (link), reasonable price. I assume you've taken those on many dives? Those look rust free. Although some of the reviews claim some of the models do rust easily (not sure which ones).

edit: The F 310 model doesn't appear to have any reviews with rust-problems. It appears to be the blades on some of the other models that rust.
Beware: many tools may be advertised as "titanium" and actually have some titanium parts, but still have mild steel components,. not even stainless.
Precisely. Some have non-stainless components that rust easily, or use a grade of stainless that rusts easily.
 

kelemvor

Big Fleshy Monster
ScubaBoard Supporter
Messages
7,640
Reaction score
4,710
Location
Largo, FL USA
# of dives
200 - 499
I like trauma shears. Cheap, yet powerful cutting tool. Makes short work of cutting lines - even thin stranded steel cable and most other stuff. I carry these along with the dgx ceramic tool. First I've seen of that titanium one. I like the material, but not sure I like the fold-out feature. I'd probably cut myself on it.

stainless "trauma" shears.. 6 pack for 8 bucks. Probably a lifetime supply for most divers.

I stopped carrying knives because I often cut myself with them and also often lost them to davey jones. I carry a pocketknife on land (and have a knife in my SAD bag) but in the water it's a dgx cutter and shears for me.
 
OP
SlugLife

SlugLife

Contributor
Messages
1,813
Reaction score
1,775
Location
Texas
# of dives
I just don't log dives
I like trauma shears. Cheap, yet powerful cutting tool. Makes short work of cutting lines - even thin stranded steel cable and most other stuff. I carry these along with the dgx ceramic tool. First I've seen of that titanium one. I like the material, but not sure I like the fold-out feature. I'd probably cut myself on it.

stainless "trauma" shears.. 6 pack for 8 bucks. Probably a lifetime supply for most divers.

I stopped carrying knives because I often cut myself with them and also often lost them to davey jones. I carry a pocketknife on land (and have a knife in my SAD bag) but in the water it's a dgx cutter and shears for me.
I'll need to throw trauma-shears into my pack, I have a few just sitting in my save-a-dive kit. Have you ever actually cut thin-steel-cable with a pair of trauma shears? I've heard people mention it, but have been waiting for someone to say they actually tested it.

For the titanium line cutter, normally it's in a sheathe, closed. When you pull it out, only the serrated side can open. It will only open if you deliberately open it. For most line/cord/webbing, use the straight-blade side which doesn't open. The serrated side is more for rope or more serious items. The risk of accidentally cutting yourself seems almost zero.
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/perdix-ai/

Top Bottom