Taking Rescue Course and I don't think the conditions are good to dive in.

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RyanT

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I fly ultra lights, and we have a saying.” It’s better to be on the ground wishing you were in the sky than being in the sky and wishing you were on the ground.”
Diving is no different in that regard. +1 on the advice others have given here. Never dive if you feel the conditions aren't safe.
 

mac64

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I just got back from the rescue class. I knew the conditions were not going to be very good when I could hear the waves 2 blocks away and it started to sprinkle. We started out with the carrying the diver out 3 different ways. It was pretty bad, whenever a wave hit us my buddy would go flying over my head and we would both tumble under water.

The current was very strong with a rip. Before we could even get to the float the majority of the class was about 100 yards off course. So much that the dive master had to assist in towing two students to the float before the class started. The class went though the same skills we went though in the pool. It was a constant struggle to stay in the area of the float because of the current. I ended up finishing up the class but it felt like I was in a rescue panicked situation the entire time.

During the entire class I was thinking about how much I could get for my dive gear and selling it all. Based on what happened today, I don't think I am going to dive anymore. I used to not be afraid of the ocean and enjoyed it, but having a constant struggle and using all of my energy to just stay near the float then practicing the skills was not fun. Even during the CPR part when getting my head dunked with waves was horrible. It was such a good feeling once my feet touched the sand and I was out of the ocean. I was relieved and grateful to get out of the ocean!

I have a deep diver class scheduled for next week and I am going to cancel it. I have no desire to go in the water anymore. Even swimming with my head above water I don't want to do.
But you still did it so congratulations. Give yourself a break. In a few weeks you’ll be back in the water enjoying yourself.
 

Seville

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I pretty much agree with what you say here. Only caveat for me is that I don't think 20 dives is too few to be taking Rescue. Of course it varies per individual. I did mine after dive # 26 and did OK--Great on some skills, not so good on others. But the purpose is to actually do toe skills in the presence of an instructor as well as to gain the book knowledge, of which there is a lot. After I completed mine, I mentioned a couple of skills to my OW buddy, just in case I ever needed him to rescue me. It may not be ideal to take Rescue with, like, less than 100 dives under your belt, but, you do get the knowledge. And it need not be done in 6 foot waves.
You are right, the book work for the rescue class gave me a lot more knowledge. One of the reasons I did it was getting out of your comfort zone does make you better. It is definitely the hardest and most strenuous class I have taken. I am glad I did it after I took a nap I feel a lot better lol!
 

Marie13

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I just got back from the rescue class. I knew the conditions were not going to be very good when I could hear the waves 2 blocks away and it started to sprinkle. We started out with the carrying the diver out 3 different ways. It was pretty bad, whenever a wave hit us my buddy would go flying over my head and we would both tumble under water.

The current was very strong with a rip. Before we could even get to the float the majority of the class was about 100 yards off course. So much that the dive master had to assist in towing two students to the float before the class started. The class went though the same skills we went though in the pool. It was a constant struggle to stay in the area of the float because of the current. I ended up finishing up the class but it felt like I was in a rescue panicked situation the entire time.

During the entire class I was thinking about how much I could get for my dive gear and selling it all. Based on what happened today, I don't think I am going to dive anymore. I used to not be afraid of the ocean and enjoyed it, but having a constant struggle and using all of my energy to just stay near the float then practicing the skills was not fun. Even during the CPR part when getting my head dunked with waves was horrible. It was such a good feeling once my feet touched the sand and I was out of the ocean. I was relieved and grateful to get out of the ocean!

I have a deep diver class scheduled for next week and I am going to cancel it. I have no desire to go in the water anymore. Even swimming with my head above water I don't want to do.

So why did you end up doing the class today given the conditions and your hesitancy when you saw the marine forecast? Instructor talk you into it or did you consider it too late?

You gotta learn to say no. Better to be out of the water than to be underwater wishing you were out of the water. I’ve called dives that I paid to do (boat charter). I’ve sat out dives on long awaited wreck dives because I didn’t like the conditions.
 

inquisit

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getting out of your comfort zone does make you better
True enough. Just make sure it's only a little uncomfortable. No one learns when overwhelmed, and bring overwhelmed could lead to other... undesirable outcomes.
 

Jim Lapenta

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A good rescue class is as much or more about preventing an incident. In this case the class taught you that no matter what the conditions are, you should risk your health and safety and that of others or risk having to pay more. I would report this shop/instructor to their agency.
Given what you just described here is how I would have handled it upon arrival.
1. Look over the conditions and compare them with the actual forecasts. Explain that any diver can call a dive at any time with no reason needed.
2. Assess the experience and training levels of all participants. Explain that any diver can call a dive at any time with no reason needed.
3. Ask each person to give their own assessment of the conditions and how they felt about them. Explain that any diver can call a dive at any time with no reason needed.
4. Start to discuss possible entry dangers and risks. Explain that any diver can call a dive at any time with no reason needed.
5. Come up with how those risks would be handled and what injuries could occur as a result of entering the water. Explain that any diver can call a dive at any time with no reason needed.
6. Determine the level of emergency response available and how to contact them. Explain that any diver can call a dive at any time with no reason needed.
7. Discuss the possible risks of trying to get out of the water in such conditions and the injuries that could occur. Explain that any diver can call a dive at any time with no reason needed.
8. Review lost/missing diver protocols. Explain that any diver can call a dive at any time with no reason needed.
9. Ask each person how they felt as newer non-rescue trained divers how qualified they feel to respond to a missing/lost diver in such conditions. Explain that any diver can call a dive at any time with no reason needed.
10. Review my article on Post Traumatic Stress in Recreational Dive Rescues and ask each person if they felt this was worth risking serious injury or death to train in these conditions. Explain that any diver can call a dive at any time with no reason needed.
11. Look at the time and pick a place for lunch while explaining that any diver can call a dive at any time with no reason needed.
12. Reschedule the class at no additional cost to the students.
 

fisheater

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I agree that this instructor should be reported.

The NUMBER ONE RULE of ALL rescue situations is to NOT BECOME ANOTHER VICTIM. As we teach it is the BSA, "Don't just do something! Stand there!" In other words, when encountering an emergency situation, don't simply react. Stop and assess. See the dangers and plan. E.g., you come across an unconscious person. Before rushing over and touching them, look for a cause, so you don't encounter the same electrical wire that shocked them.

When I first started following your saga, I was hoping that the instructor was going to gather you all up at the dive site and see if anyone was going to follow their training and question the wisdom of doing the dive in the conditions present. Anyone who did would get an "atta boy/girl." If no one spoke up, it would have been a teaching moment when the instructor called the dive.

I was very disappointed when I read that you all went ahead with the dives and that the conditions were as bad as you feared and caused the problems that they did.

This instructor taught all the wrong lessons.
 

Chavodel8en

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This reminds me of something that a very experienced diver told me about diving Monastery Beach, a site in Carmel with challenging entry/exit.

He said "You want to know the secret to diving Monastery in rough conditions?" Me: "Sure" Him: "Knowing that it will still be there next week"

I think he was saying that an experienced Monastery Beach diver knows when to dive it and when to go to Breakwater (a protected site) instead, and when to nix diving entirely (like this weekend in Monterey!!). And has confidence in their decision, so that if they are diving, they feel comfortable doing the dive. Applies to diving in general.

Know yourself, know what diving conditions you are comfortable with, be confident in your choice. Fundamental to becoming an experienced diver. Divers who wouldn't go near 4-5 foot waves can be just as experienced as divers who dive Monastery in such conditions.

I would hate for you (the OP) to stop all diving based on this bad experience.
 

scubadollar

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Nothing replaces a good, experienced and thoughtful instructor. Open communication is key in all situations and sounds like there was not enough here.
 

Subcooled

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I only have about 20 dives under my belt [...] We go though the waves and swim about 300 yards before we drop down. The forecast is for waves 4-6 feet that day.

I am nervous about doing tiring activities towing people in such harsh conditions.
I can see some risks...

I did participate in a course dive in adverse & unfamiliar conditions long ago. It resulted in four serious incidents in a row (uncontrolled descent, out of breathing gas at depth, nitrox 50 at 100 feet ppO2=2.0, difficulty maintaining deco depth). I would not do it again.

It were strange if a rescue diver class would put peer pressure on you to dive in adverse conditions with just 20 dives experience. What is the point of that class if it teaches you to take risks?

Note though that here on the forum we cannot see the actual conditions at sea. The instructor might have local knowledge that we do not (e.g. sheltered area?).
 
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