• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

Servicing your own regulators

Discussion in 'Regulators' started by Rick Warren, Feb 20, 2021.

Would you take a Manufacturer Approved Class on regulator servicing if offered?

Poll closed Feb 27, 2021.
  1. Yes

    92.3%
  2. No

    7.7%
  1. Garth

    Garth Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: North Carolina USA
    1,061
    144
    I attempted this in 2011. I had no training and didn't even have a book so I did what i thought would make sense to me. I video taped it. The video was me taking it apart because I figured if i reviewed the film i could figure out how to put it back together. Well after watching it I figured i would post it on youtube because at the time there were no videos to be found. Its not a recommended video for how to service your regulator but i kept it up anyway. I think the manufacturer supported it and later developed a class for HOG regulators which is a better option of course. At the time of the video there were no classes that i'm aware of for people outside of the industry. Below is the original video.



    Remember, this was me not knowing anything about regulators so there isn't any talking and there are moments where i clearly am putting it up to the camera for documentation... lol.
    I've gotten a lot better of course over the years and now the main thing i would suggest on reassembly is to ensure you are purging the regulator as you are setting the IP... that was the biggest "learning" tip i had to learn the hard way while ruining a few high pressure seats..
     
    Centrals, couv and rsingler like this.
  2. Open Ocean Diver

    Open Ocean Diver ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Lauderdale-by-the-Sea
    1,310
    869
    Rob what’s your opinion/thoughts on adjusting 2nd stage’s with various IP’s using this method with the micro pump. Turn the tank on, pressurize the 1st stage then shut the tank valve off. Purge until you reach your test IP, now test cracking effort with mag/IP gauge using the micro pump for suction?
     
  3. happy-diver

    happy-diver Skindiver Just feelin it

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Same ocean as you!
    2,346
    1,564



    This stuff really is ultra magnificent!
     
  4. happy-diver

    happy-diver Skindiver Just feelin it

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Same ocean as you!
    2,346
    1,564


    and this is more magnificent!
     
  5. rsingler

    rsingler Scuba Instructor, Tinkerer in Brass Staff Member ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Napa, California
    5,880
    7,627
    I think you'll frustrate yourself. That IP will last for only the tiniest of cycles even with the micro pump. If you have to test again after an adjustment, you'll have to repressurize and bleed down to desired IP a second or third time. The automotive regulator toy is cheap enough that for an experimenter like you, I'd recommend you put one together.
     
    lexvil likes this.
  6. Open Ocean Diver

    Open Ocean Diver ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Lauderdale-by-the-Sea
    1,310
    869
    True enough it has limits. Wasn't sure it was safe to run breathing gas through one of those small regulators. Do you prepare, clean it in anyway before using it?
     
    rsingler likes this.
  7. The Chairman

    The Chairman Chairman of the Board Staff Member

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Cave Country!
    62,355
    30,938
    It's really not that hard. I watch the 2nd stage lever as I screw in the seat. You'll see it rise and rise and then it simply stops rising. Back off until it starts falling, now tweak it back until you get it just as it stops rising. Using your lips, try to blow thru the port that would normally be on the hose. If air passes, you're too far in. If you've been careful, you're all done. Put the front of the reg together and check your work. I usually hold the reg with the lever pointing straight up so I can look straight across the reg.
     
    Pressurehead, jale and rsingler like this.
  8. rsingler

    rsingler Scuba Instructor, Tinkerer in Brass Staff Member ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Napa, California
    5,880
    7,627
    You can use it straight out of the box. It has no oil to contaminate the second stage. To confirm, just crank it up to max and put a wadded paper towel over the outlet. Waste 10cu ft of tank air at max flow and see if there's anything on the white paper towel.
     
    Open Ocean Diver likes this.
  9. CycleCat

    CycleCat Contributor

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: near Taos, New Mexico, USA
    168
    162
    Does anyone use a digital manometer instead of the magnahelic?
     
  10. The Chairman

    The Chairman Chairman of the Board Staff Member

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Cave Country!
    62,355
    30,938
    It would be hard for it to be useful. The digitals are used for quickly measuring fairly static readings, like the difference in pressure before/after a catalytic converter. When you're playing with a reg, you want to see the dynamics of it all, as well as see a final number.
     
    rsingler and p_kos like this.

Share This Page