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Scary bad Advanced diver.

Discussion in 'Going Pro' started by Frosty, Feb 9, 2016.

  1. Mia Toose

    Mia Toose Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Turks & Caicos Islands
    85
    48
    18
    PADI ReActivate is the new Scuba Review program. The theory online is all scenario based to refresh knowledge and then the instructor meets with the student to refresh things such as gear assembly/disassembly and any other topics the student wants refreshed or instructor sees a need for. Underwater the performance requirements cover some basic skills. I think it's a great program.

    There is continuous learning in scuba diving just like any other sport especially when the environment changes. Every instructor and experienced diver should take the opportunity to assist divers in improving their skills regardless of how ridiculous the situation appears to be.

    Sounds like Frosty did a good job refreshing and provided a safe overall experience for the diver.

    PADI ReActivate Standards Performance Requirements:

    · Remove, replace and clear the mask

    · Become neutrally buoyant and hover

    · At the surface in water too deep to stand, with a deflated BCD, use the weight system's quick release to pull clear and drop sufficient weight to become positively buoyant

    · Ascend properly using an alternate air source and establish positive buoyancy at the surface. Act as both donor and receiver.

    · Anything else the student said they wanted to practice based on the predive interview and based on the instructor's observations

    · CESA should only be conducted in confined water, horizontally.
     
    chillyinCanada likes this.
  2. TMHeimer

    TMHeimer Divemaster

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Dartmouth,NS,Canada(Eastern Passage-Atlantic)
    12,021
    2,550
    113
    Mia Toose, Yes agree it's a good program. But if you haven't dived for a year, you have to be smart enough to sign up for it, just like with Scuba Review in the past. I assume you're not talking about it as part of a probation period for all divers.
     
  3. Mia Toose

    Mia Toose Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Turks & Caicos Islands
    85
    48
    18
    It's a great program to review skills and knowledge if you haven't been diving for awhile or want a refresher.

    There is nothing to do with a probation period for all divers with regards to this course nor do I recommend something like that. :)
     
    chillyinCanada likes this.
  4. Neilwood

    Neilwood Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Scotland
    2,403
    1,404
    113
    A number of very good points.

    Bad days happen to us all - even the best instructors will probably have an off day, they might just cover it better.

    I had a similar situation on my 7th dive overall where, due to various issues with cylinders and rushing about because my dive buddies were waiting, I entered the water stressed to the max. God knows what I would have done had something happened during the dive as my stress level was way elevated until at least 10 minutes in to it. I should have probably held my hand up and said "I'm sitting this one out until I calm down". Now I wouldn't hesitate to sit it out and sort my gear out in my own time.

    The point regarding the vacation diving is very true - I reckon a huge percentage of divers will get certified on holiday in clear blue water with exceptional vis and only ever dive in the same clear blue water. I certified in 3-5m vis compared to some of them doing it in 30-50m vis. My idea of an issue underwater will be markedly different to someone like that.
     
  5. TMHeimer

    TMHeimer Divemaster

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Dartmouth,NS,Canada(Eastern Passage-Atlantic)
    12,021
    2,550
    113
    Neilwood, I recall my first couple of boat dives being the same way. Seemed like everyone else had their routine down while I was just learning mine. Can be stressful--you want to be ready, to fit in. Later it seemed I was ready and waiting for someone else who was farting around.....
     
    Mia Toose likes this.
  6. Neilwood

    Neilwood Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Scotland
    2,403
    1,404
    113
    I have no doubt that my first boat dive next weekend will be the same as your experience. Still the only way to get that experience is to do it (and pay attention to those in the know to see how they do it).
     
  7. DiverDownD3

    DiverDownD3 Barracuda

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: SOBX, NC
    499
    216
    43
    Little piece of advice. Make sure you take the bungee off the tank before you assemble your regs to the tank. Gonna be hard to dive with the boat attached to the tank. Luckily I noticed my stupidity before I tried to slip into my rig.

    Boat dives aren't bad. Assemble everything before you leave the dock, and don't be a slob by having gear all over the place. Easiest way to piss everyone off.
     
  8. agilis

    agilis Solo Diver

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: N.J.
    8,627
    10,234
    113
    Suppose your system is (like mine) a weight belt. That's all or nothing. It's also possible that the diver may not use a BCD. Sometimes I don't, especially on shallower dives. A backplate is so much sleeker, and a wetsuit provides all the buoyancy needed in an emergency situation after weights are dropped.

    I think sleek streamlined diving, a minimalist approach, is underrated. Divers covered with gear dragging all sorts of things along are missing some of the pure pleasures of the freedom possible in open water recreational diving.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2016
  9. TMHeimer

    TMHeimer Divemaster

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Dartmouth,NS,Canada(Eastern Passage-Atlantic)
    12,021
    2,550
    113
    Yeah, good advice. Less chance of losing any of your own stuff as well. On my first ever boat dive the crew took all our fins (most were blue) when we all returned to the boat & threw them in a pile. I had two different blue ones upon close examination at home--we figure my other one wound up with this veteran diver and was now in Fiji. Also put your name on everything that you can.

    As far as dumb mistakes, they can happen to anyone. I don't particularly like talking to someone when gearing up. When assisting with a course I had to be right on top of that because of also helping/talking with students. I have the "bio tank" lock on my BC strap. Sunday for the first time (probably ever in 8-9 years with it), I forgot to tighten it. If I had dived longer at some point my tank would've slipped out.

    Biggest thing on a boat dive may be to be absolutely sure your air is on before jumping. Take 3-4 breaths on the reg and make sure your gauge/computer is OK with the right amount of air and no wobbly needles. Nasty things can happen if you can't inflate the BC.
     
  10. flyboy08

    flyboy08 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: NYC
    2,885
    1,744
    113
    ive got over 300 dives under my belt, but in two weeks, I'm diving with all new gear except for my mask and snorkel....you can be darn sure I'll be setting up and confirming everything as if it were my first entry.....I'm excited to try everything out and find buoyancy neutral with all my new toys:).....AOW......here I come!
     

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