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How old to become a viable scuba instructor?

Discussion in 'Advanced Scuba Discussions' started by InTheDrink, Jun 1, 2019.

  1. Diver0001

    Diver0001 Instructor, Scuba

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    John, given this response, in your case I would say that it only comes down to a matter of age.

    Keep yourself healthy and fit and then age doesn't matter. Some operators still won't want you because you're not "attractive" enough to their target clientele but there are many out there who will want you just the same because of other things you bring to the table.

    Good luck!

    R..
     
    InTheDrink likes this.
  2. InTheDrink

    InTheDrink DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: UK, South Coast
    2,160
    349
    83
    That’s so funny. It was only 2015 when I stopped being a guide. I’m a bit fatter than I was then (70kg) but against my better nature I had to push the girls away.

    I think it’s the same thing in any position of authority. Any if you’re not too hard on the eye you get that. I always thought I was pretty ugly but girls seemed to disagree.

    But as a guide I always put principle before pleasure.

    I’ll probably regret that on my death bed but in the meantime I doubt looks would play a factor.

    I think mainly cause I’m Irish and can chat but it’s never hurt yet. Self restraint hasn’t always been easy tho but I’ve always stuck to my principles.
     
    Diver0001 likes this.
  3. Frosty

    Frosty Divemaster

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Auckland NZ
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    I'd agree that "working" for a resort dive Op does wear you out. Main reasons being the expectations you are going to do everything for them and because of the relatively low experience levels they tend to make the "dumb" mistakes more experienced divers don't
     
  4. InTheDrink

    InTheDrink DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: UK, South Coast
    2,160
    349
    83
    Which is kinda nice. When I was new I found a lot of dive pros somewhat circumspect in terms of tips and tricks, weighting, etc. I really enjoy sharing what little knowledge I have (altho especially weighting as most ops get it spectacularly wrong and make the dive much more difficult for the newer diver).

    That said even since 40 I’ve noticed my energy levels are lower now. But as long as I’m not lugging people’s twinsets I’m pretty happy and like making sure people are comfortable well before they get in the water.
     
  5. Diver0001

    Diver0001 Instructor, Scuba

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    I always tried to ignore it. In all the time I gave lessons I became friends with a number of students but romance was never really in the cards. I had one student who I believe fell in love with me (long story but I trained her for an entire season until my wife started to object to her "cooking" for me) and I had one student who made a really flattering pass at me before she knew I was married.

    I do recognise what you're saying, however. Due to the nature of my work I often see how easily women "fall" for attention from men with power and status. It is actually quite astonishing to see how much we resemble apes in our social interactions. Fortunately for my marriage I'm much more of a "Spock" than a "Kirk" so I observe without being impulsive.

    That said, at my age it's pretty much over. My beard has gone grey (largely as a result of my day-job, I think). I think I still look ok but the grey pretty much put an end to any illusions I had of remaining attractive as I get older.

    R..
     
    InTheDrink likes this.
  6. Billy Northrup

    Billy Northrup ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Key Largo / Norcal
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    Being just an "instructor" is almost worthless as instructors are a dime a dozen in scope of this thread. To be valuable you need to be able to service compressors, change oil on the boat/maintenace, wash boats down, hump allot of tanks and man the shop every ounce in awhile. When it's blown out vip/viz tanks, fill banks the kids didn't. On the hottest most humid day you have ever experienced in your life you wil changing out a marine head in a v berth. The people most valuable around the shop get to cherry pick the jobs..

    You could go independent, it's hard to get clientele but that suit what you trying to do

    Personally I'm going captain, you get allot more respect and at 47 I think it suits me

    a
     
  7. InTheDrink

    InTheDrink DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: UK, South Coast
    2,160
    349
    83
    I’ll check out Captain course. I’ve driven a liveaboard a few times but that involved nothing particular.

    My sense of direction is poor on a good day but I’m good at maths.

    I can read winds and currents reasonably well.

    All the making for a fun trip.

    But the captains I know are many levels above and I would hate to be in charge of 30 ppl+ and not be as good as them.

    The only positive is that I have a decent toolkit. Unlike make boats.
     
  8. carobinsoniv

    carobinsoniv Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Moultrie, Georgia
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    I think 45 is young and it sounds like you have a good amount of experience to compliment what is needed as an instructor. I have a number of friends in their 40s, 50s, and 60s who still train. Go for it!
     
    InTheDrink likes this.

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