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Help for older eyes needed

Discussion in 'Fins, Masks and Snorkels' started by BoatingDave, Jan 24, 2019.

  1. caruso

    caruso Banned

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Long Island, NY
    1,662
    1,190
    113
    Insert them 1 hour before getting on the boat. You're welcome.
     
  2. Storker

    Storker Divemaster

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: close to a Hell which occasionally freezes over
    12,491
    8,867
    113
    It takes more than an hour from when I get up in the morning, brush my teeth and insert my contacts to when I'm boarding the boat or parking at the site, so no worries here.
     
  3. Chris_A

    Chris_A Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: South Georgia
    29
    2
    3
    Sorry about that I lost tracking of what i was typing as i had one of the dog's clawing at me. Anyways I was saying I don't know if it I was a little myopic.
     
  4. caruso

    caruso Banned

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Long Island, NY
    1,662
    1,190
    113
    So you get seasick before you even get on the boat?
     
  5. caruso

    caruso Banned

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Long Island, NY
    1,662
    1,190
    113
    If you wore glasses only for distance prior to needing reading glasses then the answer is most likely yes.
     
  6. Storker

    Storker Divemaster

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: close to a Hell which occasionally freezes over
    12,491
    8,867
    113
    I don't get seasick on the boat
     
  7. Storker

    Storker Divemaster

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: close to a Hell which occasionally freezes over
    12,491
    8,867
    113
    Roughly as many people are hyperopic as the number or who are myopic. And then there's those with astigmatism, but neither myopia nor hyperopia. So "wearing glasses" isn't any kind of indication of what kind of correction a person needs.

    However, if someone deliberately takes off their glasses to see properly at close range, you can probably safely bet that the person is 1: myopic and 2: presbyopic
     
  8. caruso

    caruso Banned

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Long Island, NY
    1,662
    1,190
    113
    If a person has worn glasses only for distance, and then, as they approach their early to mid 40's, starts to need reading glasses, then myopia is by far the most likely scenario. If they were hyperopic, they would have needed glasses prior to early 40s, and astigmatism while certainly being one possibility (which is why I said "most likely" myopia in the earlier post), is not as likely because astigmatism is not as common as myopia or hyperopia and significant astigmatism would also cause near vision blur prior to early 40s.

    You'd lose your bet in the case of someone with mild to moderate astigmatism and a patient who requires a prismatic correction strictly for distance, typically in the case of esotropia.
     
  9. jgttrey

    jgttrey ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Houston
    570
    681
    93
    I've never liked the vinyl stick ons that can come off in the bucket and are, optically, not that great. They are better than nothing, but you get what you pay for.

    These are a little more expensive, but far better: https://www.amazon.com/MAGNI-VIEW-M...UTF8&qid=1549570859&sr=8-3&keywords=magniview

    The pictures in the listing are not that helpful, but it's a round piece of glass, flat on one side and ground on the other. Comes in a couple of strengths. You use the included adhesive, which cures in UV light (a couple of minutes outside in the sun). It works really well if you're careful and the cheater can only be removed with a lot of effort. It will never come off by accident. It's basically permanent and the clue is crystal clear. Once installed, it looks like it was ground along with the rest of the lens.

    The optics are way better than the cheaper ones. I put in the bottom of the mask, one on each side, to read computers or camera settings. Crystal clear and works great. You can buff, defog and clean to your heart's content without worry. It's more expensive (and only one comes in the package), but I have them in 3 or 4 masks and love them.

    Only caveat is that while its perfect for reading a computer or camera, it's a smallish "porthole" of correction. If you're looking for something that will let you look for small critters and need a broader field of view, then a corrective mask is about the only option.
     
    Boiler_81 and ReadyDiverOne like this.
  10. BoatingDave

    BoatingDave Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    44
    3
    8
    That's exactly what I'm thinking of doing? Do you recall what brand you got? Are you able to defog them ok too?
     

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