First service cost?

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KD8NPB

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Could you give me an example of these more involved regs?

From my experience:
Aqualung Micra second stage
Aqualung Glacia (old style) second stage
Apeks DST first stage with some seized fittings
Poseidon Jetstream second stage
Dacor Pacer 360 second stage (having to remove the demand lever by prying is a pain)

And any commercial service regulator (mainly a time investment in pre-cleaning)
 
R

redacted

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For those who don't have the machine how do you cycle the regs? Cheers

I use my finger like a small hammer to tap the cover on a 2nd stage rapidly. Each tap just barely breaks the seal. I probably get 2 to 3 cycles per second that way. I give it maybe a minute, so about 150 cycles

---------- Post added May 11th, 2013 at 08:54 AM ----------

Could you give me an example of these more involved regs?

Add to that list the Scubapro Pilot, Air1, and D-series if done right. The wireform springs might need some special words. Using a standard round o-ring to seal the switch can be a character builder. And the diaphragm on the pilot/Air1 can be a real challenge. I have not had to do all the internals on my pilot yet but the schematic makes that look like it could be interesting.

BTW, it takes me hours to rebuild a regulator, but I have no credentials - just lots of time and a desire to know my regulators are done right.
 

buddhasummer

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I use my finger like a small hammer to tap the cover on a 2nd stage rapidly. Each tap just barely breaks the seal. I probably get 2 to 3 cycles per second that way. I give it maybe a minute, so about 150 cycles

---------- Post added May 11th, 2013 at 08:54 AM ----------



Add to that list the Scubapro Pilot, Air1, and D-series if done right. The wireform springs might need some special words. Using a standard round o-ring to seal the switch can be a character builder. And the diaphragm on the pilot/Air1 can be a real challenge. I have not had to do all the internals on my pilot yet but the schematic makes that look like it could be interesting.

BTW, it takes me hours to rebuild a regulator, but I have no credentials - just lots of time and a desire to know my regulators are done right.

cheers for that.
 

Nemrod

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For those who don't have the machine how do you cycle the regs? Cheers


I will sit down while watching a movie and cycle the regulator. Then I generally dive them in a pool.


On the subject of more involved regulators:

Tekna T2100 series
Any balanced adjustable type

N
 
R

redacted

Guest
On the subject of more involved regulators:

Any balanced adjustable type

N

I find it much easier to service a Scubapro Balanced Adjustable (156) than any classic downstream design like an R190. About the only thing easier is the Scubapro Adjustable (109).
 
OP
motorref

motorref

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Service update:
I picked my reg yesterday an d paid the$220. Ralph (owner) wasn't in and the girl didn't know anything about the issue.
To his credit Ralph called me later and apologized - said the disconnect was between them and Air Tech in NC, where they sent it to.
Ralph offered me a credit - service, stuff or back to my card for the difference. Being a small shop I really don't want to take advantage of his generosity though as I'm sure it'll cut into his bottom line.
thanks for all of these the advice!
Kevin L
 

luckydays

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Service update:
I picked my reg yesterday an d paid the$220. Ralph (owner) wasn't in and the girl didn't know anything about the issue.
To his credit Ralph called me later and apologized - said the disconnect was between them and Air Tech in NC, where they sent it to.
Ralph offered me a credit - service, stuff or back to my card for the difference. Being a small shop I really don't want to take advantage of his generosity though as I'm sure it'll cut into his bottom line.
thanks for all of these the advice!
Kevin L

Sounds like it all ended well. At least the owner was a stand up guy and called you back. even if you dont use the credit, its nice to know that he tried to make it right.
 

buddhasummer

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I will sit down while watching a movie and cycle the regulator. Then I generally dive them in a pool.


On the subject of more involved regulators:

Tekna T2100 series
Any balanced adjustable type

N

Do you use the same method same as awap?
 

couv

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I don't often disagree with The Master, but while tapping on a second stage may cycle the second stage, I do not feel it properly cycles the first stage because it remains pressurized. In my view, to properly cycle a first stage, the gas supply must be turned on, then off, purged, and re-pressurized (one cycle.) If the first stage is not depressurized, then the hard and soft seats are not being mated with enough force.

I made a DIY tool to cycle first stages. It has a pressure relieve valve with a pull ring and screws into a l/p port. This way, no second stage is needed so very little gas loss results with each cycle.

Having said all that, The Master's regulators all work just fine and he is alive and well.

(A smaller pressure relief valve could probably eliminate a few of the adapters)

Coonass_First_Stage_Cycling_Device.jpg


The time it takes to rebuild a regulator in more related to the amount of cleaning it requires. If a regulator is badly corroded, it can be very difficult to disassemble and clean. Conversely, a regulator that is pristine and only requires parts changing and cycling can be done very quickly.
 
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https://www.shearwater.com/products/teric/

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