DIN Retainer stuck...and i mean really stuck !

Please register or login

Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

Benefits of registering include

  • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
  • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
  • You can make this box go away

Joining is quick and easy. Log in or Register now!

R

redacted

Guest
Put hold bar in first stage and clamp in vice. Insert hex key into retainer. Slip long, narrow, steel pipe over end of hex key (a metre or more in length) and apply pressure to the end of the pipe. The retainer will unscrew, you just need enough leverage.

You may need someone to hold your beer.
 

axxel57

Contributor
Messages
787
Reaction score
631
Location
Central Europe
Put hold bar in first stage and clamp in vice. Insert hex key into retainer. Slip long, narrow, steel pipe over end of hex key (a metre or more in length) and apply pressure to the end of the pipe. The retainer will unscrew, you just need enough leverage.

Yes, right, but that's also exact the way how one can destroy the hex socket..........:)
 

Hickdive

Contributor
Messages
1,029
Reaction score
658
Location
Glasgow, UK
# of dives
1000 - 2499
Yes, right, but that's also exact the way how one can destroy the hex socket..........:)

And whacking it with an impact driver won't?

The hex socket is much less likely to be damaged provided your hex key is inserted into the full length of the socket.

Leverage is your friend as it allows much greater control than just smacking things with hammers.
 

The Chairman

Chairman of the Board
Staff member
Messages
63,033
Reaction score
31,913
Location
Cave Country!
# of dives
I just don't log dives
And whacking it with an impact driver won't?
It's far less likely to surpass the shear point than over stressing it with your method. The vibration and sudden tortional jolt has a far better chance of moving the fastener and not damaging it. Too many buy into "if a wrench don't work, try a bigger wrench" mentality and often create a mess that can not be repaired.
 

beanojones

Contributor
Messages
3,204
Reaction score
340
Impact tools are great on hard metals. On soft metals, I would resort to them before I went with excessive force. But there are gentler alternatives that are less likely to damage parts if you are willing to put in the time and effort.

Of course, there are differences between having to get it done, and having time, but

The inpact wrenches (especially the hand held, battery powered ones with adjustable torque settings) are going to do way less damage than repeated hand tool attacks, because they are leveraging the vibration to break chemical welding just like a ultrasonic cleaner does, with the added benefit of moving the fastener.

One I switched to that sort of impact driver, I have saved a lot of time that used to be spent trying to get gentle vibrations of an ultrasonic cleaner to work.

There's kind of no way to measure which gear would have died, but it seem like with less application of chemicals to try and unstick stuck parts, there is more gear surviving.

Of course it is worth noting that I get a fair amount of gear that has such wonderful things as port plugs that leave all their threads behind. Boat gear dies faster than anything in the world.
 

axxel57

Contributor
Messages
787
Reaction score
631
Location
Central Europe
And whacking it with an impact driver won't?

I don't know, I didn't mention impact drivers but leaned in for the special tool.

I just have enough experience to know how steel wins against brass when used with force and leverage.:)
 
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Location
manchester
# of dives
I have removed DIN from more than 12 first scubapro stages that I bought used and apart from an MK17 that was really buggered I managed to unscrew the DIN after a lot of hassle. My advice with all respect to all the other people that have told you very right things would be to use an engine Allen key that fits PERFECTLY (if I remember right it must be a 6 mm one or may be imperial, Scubapro mind u uses imperial on some first stages like the port plugs) on a bar with a socket ending. I don't know how to call it in English but in Greece where I come from we call it a T wrench and it looks exactly like a T. That way you can give your Allen key a LIGHT tap with a mallet first perpendicularly to the fitting and then apply VERY EVEN force on both the hands of the T wrench with BOTH your hands and unscrew the DIN retainer.This has always worked for me and you can find that bit in any car tools store. All the MK25s I have tried to open over the years had this problem as idiots don't soak em in fresh water and as u know this is an exposed reg, that is why it is not great for very cold conditions really, they obviously tend to freeflow especially in cold fresh water.I know all the cold and hot tricks but I have never resorted to them as the T wrench has always done the trick (apart from that bloody MK17).You can't imagine how little torque you will need to whack it open as it works with a lever and levers decrease the power you use.I am not a specialist and away and the other lads obviously know better, I am just laying my opinion as this has always worked for me.Hope u sort it out mateRegards
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/perdix-ai/

Top Bottom