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Anti-Fogging Treatments for New Masks. (a comparison of techniques)

Discussion in 'General Scuba Equipment Discussions' started by lowviz, Feb 23, 2019.

  1. Jiminy

    Jiminy Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: East Coast
    190
    80
    28
    How does this not scratch the glass? I would think comet has really large pieces of abrasive compared to toothpaste
     
  2. BDSC

    BDSC Solo Diver

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Wake Forest, NC
    6,671
    3,023
    113
    I’m guessing I’ve performed this at least 10 times or more and it’s never scratched any of the masks I’ve tried it on.
     
  3. lowviz

    lowviz Solo Diver ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Northern Delaware or the New Jersey Turnpike
    6,485
    3,092
    113
    We press on.

    Here are the recommended test abrasives/cleaners, I'm trying for three spot treatments per mask. That will leave the last pair of masks for my over-the-top 'no-scrub' attempts. Everything will be duplicated on @Johnoly 's plastic lens masks.

    Bon Ami
    Cerama Bryte
    Comet
    Lemon Soft Scrub
    Micro-Gloss liquid abrasive
    Sand ('very fine', sieved to known size) http://publications.iowa.gov/17268/1/IADOT_hr99_History_Particle_Limits.pdf
    Sea Buff
    Toothpaste (most aggressive possible)
    TSP

    Let's freeze the abrasive treatments here to keep things moving. Speak up if I missed anybody who previously posted a suggestion.
     
    Johnoly and Jiminy like this.
  4. lowviz

    lowviz Solo Diver ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Northern Delaware or the New Jersey Turnpike
    6,485
    3,092
    113
    We now have 'very fine sand'. It will pass through a No. 120 sieve (125 micron) and is held up on a No. 170 sieve (90 micron). Interesting stuff...

    125-90 microns is well within the definition of 'very fine sand'. (the next stop is silt.)

    I love following the scientific method! Learn something new every day. :)
     
  5. BDSC

    BDSC Solo Diver

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Wake Forest, NC
    6,671
    3,023
    113
    I wish I were still in my old job. We had some 1, 3, and 9 micron diamond polishing compounds. We would use the 1 micron to remove any scratches.
     
  6. vastag

    vastag Angel Fish

    9
    5
    3
    I was distracted by the dog on the sofa not giving any sh*ts about the proceedings.
     
    Hoyden and GrafCanuck like this.
  7. Rred

    Rred Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: In a safe place
    1,058
    441
    83
    Jiminy-
    Back in the 80's, as Corning Ware and acrylic bathtub surrounds were becoming popular and getting destroyed by Ajax and Comet...they all reformulated to become more like BonAmi. BonAmi was always based on diatomaceous earth ("fuller's earth") the same powdered white mineral that most toothpaste is based on. And used as the filler in TNT sticks, oddly enough.
    Today they are all designed to be used on acrylic tub surrounds, Corian countertops, and other plastics that are way softer than the glass in a diving mask. The traditional "scouring" powders, may not be on the market anymore. They made the change kinda quietly, but a long time ago.
     
    RayfromTX, couv and lowviz like this.
  8. lowviz

    lowviz Solo Diver ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Northern Delaware or the New Jersey Turnpike
    6,485
    3,092
    113
    No lie!

    Interesting insight, it appears to be true: http://www.gjfood.com/pdf/msds/92_820370.pdf

    OK, looks like we are shooting at a moving target. I'll get some representative 'today' cleaners and pull the trigger...
     
  9. Jcp2

    Jcp2 Barracuda

    360
    235
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    Whatever the final results are, I’m going to apply them to all masks stored in a closed air space. Maybe it’s not a factory thing but a plastic mask box thing.
     
  10. dberry

    dberry Hydrophilic ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Philadelphia
    978
    504
    93
    It's true that Comet and such no longer have the abrasives they used to. But Cerama Bryte is designed for cleaning / polishing ceramic stove tops and quartz counters. I'd be very surprised if it would scratch glass - especially the glass in dive masks, which is probably tempered glass.

    FWIW, it's not only a matter of how large the abrasive particles are, the ability to scratch a surface depends on how hard the abrasive is. Diatomaceous earth is fairly soft (and the particles are fine). Alumina ("corundum") is harder, and silicon carbide ("carborundum") is much harder still. Silicon carbide is the abrasive most commonly found in "wet/dry" paper. I would not recommend cleaning a mask with silicon carbide or wet/dry paper, even if you use one of the super-fine grits used for polishing things (auto body work, etc.)
     
    couv likes this.

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