Solo with no BCD?

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AfterDark

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The fact that you like it and do it doesn't mean that it's a good idea.

Did you see the words "good idea" in my post that you quoted? I stated it's the way I'd like to live my life others can do as they wish with their life(s).
 

CT-Rich

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Plenty of dive practices from the 60s, 70s and 80s were fine back then, but are not considered best practices today. 60’ per minute ascents (follow your smallest bubbles) with no safety stop was standard. No octopus, no pressure gauge (j-valve for reserve) were all standard practices once upon a time. You can do it, there are no scuba police, knock your self out.

But, if you are looking for an endorsement that you can use to rationalize an unsafe diving practice? No, I think not. It would be like asking how far into a cave can you swim with out training on a recreational rig. You can do it, might get away with it, but nobody should endorse it. Get your BCD fixed.
 

John C. Ratliff

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Here's what the dry suit of the 1960s and early 1970s looked like:

41959528234_a5436d8868_k.jpg
New England Divers 1970002 by John Ratliff, on Flickr

John
 

Subcooled

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Plenty of dive practices from the 60s, 70s and 80s were fine back then, but are not considered best practices today.

The divers have changed, too.

The young and fit have been replaced with the gravitationally challenged.
Not that many divers are good swimmers anymore either.
 

ginti

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Did you see the words "good idea" in my post that you quoted?

This post is about giving suggestions to a diver who asked suggestions; I can see 3 possibilities: [A] you thought it was a good idea {B} you suggest things that you consider bad to other people [C] one person between you and me did not understand the purpose of this thread (and of the forum).

I stated it's the way I'd like to live my life others can do as they wish with their life(s).

Well, very bad attitude. Most of the consequences of your actions will affect also other people. If you have an accident, because of the lack of seatbelts you may have serious injuries. As a consequence, doctors will have to spend time on you that could have spent on other (more diligent but unlucky) people. If you have a fatal accident because of the lack of seatbelts, your relatives and friends will suffer a lot. And all of these just because you do not like seatbelts. But do as you wish :)

Obviously, the same apply to diving.

P.S. I will not start any discussion about this topic, it's just a no-go for me. Feel free to answer if you want, but don't expect me to reply back.
 

AfterDark

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This post is about giving suggestions to a diver who asked suggestions; I can see 3 possibilities: [A] you thought it was a good idea {B} you suggest things that you consider bad to other people [C] one person between you and me did not understand the purpose of this thread (and of the forum).



Well, very bad attitude. Most of the consequences of your actions will affect also other people. If you have an accident, because of the lack of seatbelts you may have serious injuries. As a consequence, doctors will have to spend time on you that could have spent on other (more diligent but unlucky) people. If you have a fatal accident because of the lack of seatbelts, your relatives and friends will suffer a lot. And all of these just because you do not like seatbelts. But do as you wish :)

Obviously, the same apply to diving.

P.S. I will not start any discussion about this topic, it's just a no-go for me. Feel free to answer if you want, but don't expect me to reply back.

Well then you were should check the thread more carefully because the post of mine you quoted concerned seat belts and motorcycle helmets, not diving.

What others judgements of me are concern me not. I pay my way nobody has to pay for whatever mistake I make, it's the way I lived my life for 67 years and I ain't changing now. Thanks in advance for the no reply.
 

ginti

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Well then you were should check the thread more carefully because the post of mine you quoted concerned seat belts and motorcycle helmets, not diving.

You quoted me, so you should check why and how I used that comparison.
 

AfterDark

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You quoted me, so you should check why and how I used that comparison.

And you said you weren't going to reply. :(
 

AfterDark

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The divers have changed, too.

The young and fit have been replaced with the gravitationally challenged.
Not that many divers are good swimmers anymore either.

Amen, if it were left to these safety cap bottle on the world types we'd still be wondering what it looks like underwater. Or on the moon for that matter.
 
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