• Welcome to ScubaBoard

  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

Solo with no BCD?

Discussion in 'Solo Divers' started by northcave, Jul 11, 2021.

  1. ginti

    ginti Contributor

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Lyon, France
    777
    460
    Ok, got it. Surely it is possible, I just find it a bad idea, that's it :)
     
  2. Doc Harry

    Doc Harry Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Appalachia
    3,641
    867
    Sometimes skills just don't cut it, and you need a BC.

    I've done some solo diving internationally, as side trips, when I did not have my own gear

    When all you can rent is a 7mm wetsuit and an AL80 tank, no amount of "skill" is compensate for all that lead that you have to wear.
     
    John C. Ratliff likes this.
  3. John C. Ratliff

    John C. Ratliff Scuba Instructor

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Beaverton, Oregon
    3,057
    1,791
    Well, I’d have to disagree. In the 1970s I dove Clear Lake, Oregon (39 degrees F & 150 foot visibility), down to about 40 feet, made a butterfly knot in the anchor line (a loop that can be quickly removed), and took off my weight belt. I hooked it to the line, then continued to dive below 45 feet in perfectly neutral buoyancy. Before surfacing, I swam back to the anchor line, put my weights back on, removed the butterfly loop, and surfaced.

    SeaRat
     
    Bob DBF, SlugMug and Wibble like this.
  4. Doc Harry

    Doc Harry Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Appalachia
    3,641
    867
    Brilliant!
     
    John C. Ratliff likes this.
  5. rx7diver

    rx7diver Contributor

    1,165
    493
    @John C. Ratliff and @Doc Harry,

    I first learned about drop weights when I took my cavern and basic cave course in 1988. Several Pb weights tied together with a clip added. Dive down sufficiently deep (for your wet suit to compress), and then un-clip the bundle of weights from your kit, clip it to the permanent line, and continue your dive.

    Pro: Basic cave means no "circuits" and no "jumps", so you always have to return via the route you entered. (So, you will always come back to retrieve your weights for the ascent.) Meanwhile, you don't have to dive carrying all that "extra" weight.

    Con: You've got to be very careful that your planned route through the cave does not ascend too much! (Right?)

    I don't think I would ever use drop weights for recreational diving in open water. Recreational diving means you can safely ascend directly to the surface in the case of an emergency. So, if you left your drop weights way over there, but you need to ascend right now from over here, you could have a problem.

    rx7diver
     
  6. SlugMug

    SlugMug Contributor

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Texas
    636
    480
    Agreed, a lot of things can be overcome with skills, training, and/or redundancy.

    I certainly understand being adamant that new divers shouldn't do certain things, like dive solo.
    I never heard of drop-weights (versus "dropping weights"), but that makes sense. I might be inclined to carry a rolled-up mesh bag I could stuff rocks into for redundancy. In some of my super-early dives, I was either underweighted, or unable to dump all air from my BCD, and I picked up rocks off the bottom a few times to aid in my safety-stop.
     
    John C. Ratliff likes this.
  7. rx7diver

    rx7diver Contributor

    1,165
    493
    Yes, "drop weights" (without the hyphen) are discussed in my cavern textbook (Zumrick Jr., J.L., J.J. Prosser, and H.V. Grey, 1988. NSS Cavern Diving Manual. Brandford FL: NSS-CDS) and my cave diving textbook (Prosser, J, and H.V. Grey, eds, 1992. NSS Cave Diving Manual - An Overview. Brandford FL: NSS-CDS). Not a new concept.

    rx7diver
     
    SlugMug likes this.
  8. John C. Ratliff

    John C. Ratliff Scuba Instructor

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Beaverton, Oregon
    3,057
    1,791
    Okay, I'm going to quote a part of my article in NAUI News, July 1973:
    This was published some 15 years before NSS Cavern Diving Manual, in 1988, and I'm wondering whether my article publishing this technique was the first ever reference to reference it?

    SeaRat
     
  9. Pressurehead

    Pressurehead ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Queensland Australia
    754
    595
    We did this diving twin 63s, no BC < 18m, Fenzy [horse collar BC with it's own small cylinder] > 18m up till about 1987 or so.
    Making sure you came back to where you placed your weight belt certainly improved you underwater navigation skills.
     
    Bob DBF, rx7diver and John C. Ratliff like this.
  10. Wibble

    Wibble Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: UK
    1,282
    982
    I'm a bit young for this :wink:

    I remember reading my dad's BSAC scuba manual when we lived in Singapore in 1968/9. Alas and annoyingly I don't have that manual, but loved reading it as a child (burst lung sounds great!) and always wanted to join him on the scuba trips. I remember it was a wire-bound manual.

    My point is that manuals did actually exist in those days, certainly for BSAC, so would really expect other agencies to have written similar. Some people should have those hanging around nowadays.

    Would love to find a copy of that manual.
     

Share This Page