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Sea-Net mask

Discussion in 'Vintage Equipment Diving' started by ShawanoDiver, May 3, 2018.

  1. АлександрД

    АлександрД Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Moscow, Russia
    764
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    sorry for small offtopic....
    In Russia we have very nice folk saying
    When water is not solid - water is warm!
    :)
     
  2. KEWDOS

    KEWDOS Garibaldi

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: UK
    2
    0
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    hi

    I AM a uk published author. [Quentin Rees ] have uncovered much new material ref SRU with wright and rodecker etc. have managed to contact relative of Wright and have more info etc. the purpose was to add to already researched ww2 documentation much of which does not feature within Wrights book F of B.
    would be interested in any leads or contact details of Rodecker relatives, pucs etc etc.
     
  3. KEWDOS

    KEWDOS Garibaldi

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: UK
    2
    0
    1
    hi

    I AM a uk published author. [Quentin Rees ] have uncovered much new material ref SRU with wright and rodecker etc. have managed to contact relative of Wright and have more info etc. the purpose was to add to already researched ww2 documentation much of which does not feature within Wrights book F of B.
    would be interested in any leads or contact details of Rodecker relatives, pucs etc etc.
     
  4. Sam Miller III

    Sam Miller III Scuba Legend Scuba Legend

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: CALIFORNIA: Where recreational diving began!
    4,865
    3,452
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    Frank was a very heavy cigarette smoker and contracted a respiratory/heart condition. He retired from the LA Co Life guards and moved to a California Mountain community for fresh pure breathing air.

    We were in occasional contact for a number of years during the pre e mail era mostly chatting about people , places, and things of the past.

    Then one day about 25 -30 (?) years ago I received a letter from his wife Charlotte that Frank had passed away. That was my last contact . I strongly suspect that his wife has subsequently passed away.

    Frank had been married several times- I also suspect all his wives are no longer with us. We never chatted about children -- he may or may not have had children .

    There are two long shots for information
    Laura Lee Sturgil- Meistral -- late in life she married Bob of the Ski N dive - Body glove family. You can possibly contact her via the company
    Jay Riffe of the Spear Gun Company - his brother late John worked for Pops Romano in early 1950s.
    Also contact Jay via his company

    These are the best leads I can offer at this time. Good luck in your research

    Please reman in contact and keep us informed as to your progress

    Cheers from California - where it all began

    Sam Miller, 111

    cc
    @Akimbo
    @David Wilson
    @MaxBottomtime (does business with Div N surf)


    @Marie13 CE
     
    Akimbo likes this.
  5. David Wilson

    David Wilson Loggerhead Turtle

    1,849
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    The author of the Cockleshell Heroes books? I see Sam has responded with some good leads and the names of some individuals to follow up on. I'm afraid my own knowledge of Frank Rodecker is confined to what I've read in Wright's Frogmen of Burma.

    In the matter of Sea Net, the following fim was shot in 1944 illustrating the use of the company's gear:
     
  6. Mike Lev

    Mike Lev Barracuda

    379
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    Hello Mr.Rees you keep mentioning Wright and Rodecker.But you forgot about Hal Messinger.The other American over there.Hal and Frank both worked for Sea Net Mfg.Hal has almost all the patents held on most of the Sea Dive masks.He was a jobber for Sea Net.I thought he was a Lt. over there also.You might be able to track some of his family.Just a thought.Good luck.Mike.
     
  7. captain

    captain Captain

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    My sister who was born in 1925 and was 19 years my elder had a Sea Net mask. I remember it well when I was in grammar school in the early 1950's. I don't know when or where she acquired it but it was in Louisiana. Last I recall of it was it had turned to goo in the Louisiana heat.
     
  8. Sam Miller III

    Sam Miller III Scuba Legend Scuba Legend

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: CALIFORNIA: Where recreational diving began!
    4,865
    3,452
    113
    @captain
    Sea Net masks were constructed of very hard almost inflexible rubber and did not and are still not deteriorating after all these years of abuse and use.

    If the mask turned to gummy mess it was a post WW11 European mask. Most common in the US at that time was the Squale which had a feathered skirt which turned gummy after a few submersions.

    SDM
     
  9. Akimbo

    Akimbo Lift to Freedom Volunteer Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    8,874
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    Just another possibility. It "might" have been an earlier mask but was stored too close to chemicals such as gasoline fumes, combustion byproducts from a furnace or water heater, and/or too much UV/sun exposure. The only material used on masks that is largely immune to UV and chemical attack is Silicon.
     
    David Wilson and Sam Miller III like this.
  10. captain

    captain Captain

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    It was not a Squale, I had several Squales. Turned to goo may be too strong a term but it did deteriorate and become unusable. Yes it was a hard rubber. People who have never lived in the south don't appreciate the effects of the heat on materials. We did not have air conditioning until the late 50's so the mast was subject to the heat almost year round. Louisiana has two seasons , summer, March to December, and winter January to February.
     
    David Wilson and Sam Miller III like this.

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