Sand Tiger Shark Question

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rob.mwpropane

rob.mwpropane

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I've bumped into them before on accident (they were so thick it was unavoidable) and all they did was look at me. I didn't see it, but one of my buddies said one was tailing me once and eyeing my fins hungrily so he scootered toward it aggressively and it took off (it was a Gavin so was prob bigger than the shark..). I've been close enough to touch them on numerous occasions and they haven't bothered me, but that proximity was never intentional...kinda like Austin said, we popped out of a wreck or around a corner and there were a couple like right there.
I've seen too many incidents where sharks don't look like they like to be touched, it would have just been nice if I could swim around the circle with them. I started to, but fear got the best of me. It didn't help that they were swimming in both directions. I would have had to come head on at some point.

Very surreal, mind blowing to just watch them though. I know of my 2hr diving at least 40 min was devoted to just watching them. There was some big ones (to me). I think max was 7-8' long, but some were pretty fat. Absolutely awesome experience.
 

O-ring

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I've seen too many incidents where sharks don't look like they like to be touched, it would have just been nice if I could swim around the circle with them. I started to, but fear got the best of me. It didn't help that they were swimming in both directions. I would have had to come head on at some point.

Very surreal, mind blowing to just watch them though. I know of my 2hr diving at least 40 min was devoted to just watching them. There was some big ones (to me). I think max was 7-8' long, but some were pretty fat. Absolutely awesome experience.
Agreed. I don't touch anything underwater that is alive if I can avoid it. Especially stuff with teeth, spines or stingers. This dude was spearfishing on our boat on a particularly sand tigery day and they sure took an interest in his scooter/catch. I didn't stick around to see what happened when he retrieved it.



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rob.mwpropane

rob.mwpropane

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Agreed. I don't touch anything underwater that is alive if I can avoid it. Especially stuff with teeth, spines or stingers. This dude was spearfishing on our boat on a particularly sand tigery day and they sure took an interest in his scooter/catch. I didn't stick around to see what happened when he retrieved it.



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That's a big boy! Lol...

I just don't know what I don't know. The sharks didn't care at all that someone was spearfishing. They just seemed content swimming in circles. If plenty of people on here said "it's not a problem" then I'd be more apt to get a little closer.

I was thinking also, it might be a little easier in NC to be closer because I've seen videos where they swim through the wreck. Once everyone is in the wreck there's only so much room. In NJ they mostly stayed around the sand. In a big wide open space when one turns towards you, it's because he wants to, not because it's the only place he has to go.
 

Divin'Papaw

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I've had similar experience to the others on the wrecks off of NC. As long as you stay calm and don't approach them aggressively or make sudden movements, they tolerate divers incredibly well. More so than any of the sharks we have here in FL with the possible exception of the Lemons in winter. Just give them space and the right of way and then just sit back and enjoy diving with them! You don't want to inadvertently pen one in either within the wreck or up against the wreck. If they feel threatened they are going to flee even if that requires going through you.
 

tbone1004

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don't spearfish around them, they're basically asleep during the day when you see them normally but they wake up quick when you shoot something.
If you're on a CCR you can get elbow to fin with them and they really don't care. On OC, if they're old enough and around divers they will usually move away from you because they don't like people chasing them, but you are nowhere near anything on their menu.
 

Kha

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They cover the wrecks off NC during the summer. You have to get touching distance sometimes just to get through them when they are particularly thick on a wreck. We usually spear on ledges but also hit wrecks some. I’ve shot fish right under their noses and they didn’t seem to notice. Only had a couple show any interest in the fish and that’s usually the smaller ones.
 

tarponchik

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According to this database, there were 36 non-fatal and 0 fatal unprovoked attacks by Sand Tigers. I saw them off NC and in Australia where they are called "Grey Nurse Sharks" but it is the same species. They seemed unconcerned but no one tried to approach them, the divers just watched. Unfortunately, as I've been told, they were overhunted along Florida coasts.
 

Johnoly

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@rob.mwpropane ,,Keep writing your dive reports. The excitement you saw really comes out in your writing and that's what we need more of on SB. Add me to the NC list of Sand Tiger shark divers. They are very different from our Jupiter sharks and I had a blast diving with them.
 
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rob.mwpropane

rob.mwpropane

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They cover the wrecks off NC during the summer. You have to get touching distance sometimes just to get through them when they are particularly thick on a wreck. We usually spear on ledges but also hit wrecks some. I’ve shot fish right under their noses and they didn’t seem to notice. Only had a couple show any interest in the fish and that’s usually the smaller ones.
We had a guy spearfishing on the dive, they didn't seem to notice. There was another diver who was kicking some stuff up going after a lobster.. ironically it seemed like they had more interest in him, like he caught their attention. They never got close though.

@rob.mwpropane ,,Keep writing your dive reports. The excitement you saw really comes out in your writing and that's what we need more of on SB. Add me to the NC list of Sand Tiger shark divers. They are very different from our Jupiter sharks and I had a blast diving with them.
I appreciate your kind words Sir. That's a feel good post, might even have made me blush a little:)
 

100days-a-year

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I've dove with thousands on probably a hundred different sites minimum usually spearfishing every time and never noticed much aggression towards the diver but occasionally they will snatch an untended fish.

That being said, all bets are off when they are migrating S for the winter. They come alive and act like other sharks. I've had them follow me up the water column which is very unusual for these guys.
 

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