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Safety equipment - PLB?

Discussion in 'Indonesia' started by billt4sf, Jul 28, 2016.

  1. boulderjohn

    boulderjohn Technical Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Boulder, CO
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    So I am now diving in Indonesia.

    So far none of the boats (6) I have been on have had a radio.

    As for the dire need for a PLB, so far the farthest I have surfaced from shore has been perhaps 40 yards. The last three days, it has been about 20 yards at the most.
     
  2. Dizzi Lizzi

    Dizzi Lizzi ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: California
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    That's exactly how it should be. Rescue devices-from a smb to a plb are only insurance
     
  3. Dan

    Dan ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Lake Jackson, Texas
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    Some of the great divings in Indonesia are drift diving in the current. However, you will need to pick the right dive operators & DMs who are familiar with the area & the right time to dive in the area, not like what happened to these guys: Rescued British divers 'had to fight off Komodo dragons' after drifting in Indonesian waters for two days | Daily Mail Online

    So far, knock on woods, I haven't got lost at sea after those fast current drift diving. The small boat followed our bubbles. By the time we surfaced the boat was in close distance to see us without the need to air up our SMB.
     
  4. giffenk

    giffenk Great White

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: toronto
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    Both the lifeline and a PLB are 2 part systems. You need to buy your part.

    That leaves the (not so) obvious question of "who buys the other part?".

    For a PLB the other part is already bought and in operation with well defined (but not complete) coverage areas.

    Lifeline coverage? YMMV...
     
  5. charlier

    charlier Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Seattle/Singapore/Indonesia
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    True for much of Indonesia. Some boats do have radio(s) and O2, but these are the exemptions. Many current-rich dives are long open coastlines with steep cliffs or along remote pinnacles on the open ocean. In such conditions, I choose my dive series with care. On a separate, but fun question - so where did you decide to visit and how long is your dive vacation? Best wishes in Indonesia.
     
    Wingy likes this.
  6. boulderjohn

    boulderjohn Technical Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Boulder, CO
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    I'm in Bali, currently in Tulamben. I was in Nusa Lembogan before that. We did Jemeluk today. I will only be here a couple more days, sorry to say.
     
  7. charlier

    charlier Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Seattle/Singapore/Indonesia
    1,035
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    Hope you are having a good week visiting my weekend underwater playground.
     
    Cali_diver likes this.
  8. Clernix

    Clernix Nassau Grouper

    72
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    Just finished up Komodo and Raja live aboard. I used my nautlis once. We dove Taka Masar and the current was ripping. The two groups got separated and we ended up blown completely of course. When we surfaced there was a day boat in the area but they did not have a radio. They said they would find our boat. I had already tested my new nautlis and the boat and I were both on channel 9.
    I gave it to the divemaster he called the boat and it worked fine. While we were in no immediate danger it made the pick up a lot easier. Our live aboard was a dot on the horizon so we have traveled a long distance.

    It also made me the hero of the day lol!

    Money well spent.
     
  9. billt4sf

    billt4sf Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Fayetteville GA, Wash DC, NY, Toronto, SF
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    Thanks for that info. When we go to RA later this year, I'll hopefully get my Lifeline set to a channel the boat can receive.

    We have spent the last about three weeks in Northern Sulawesi. None of the boats or land operators have had radios. Sometimes our pickup boat was (I'm guessing) more than a kilometer from us. I'm glad we had Storm Whistles and DiveAlerts, though we never used them. (OK, once we used a whistle but it probably wasn't really necessary.)

    I am glad I started the thread, and I'm glad we decided on having a range of options for lost-at-sea pickup. That seems to be the important part.

    - Bill
     
  10. Kevrumbo

    Kevrumbo Banned

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
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    As a US Citizen for example, your US registered PLB is a last chance back-up in case the Nautilus VHF Beacon drops out because of range limitations (Nautilus advertises 57km AIS maximum, but realistically at best only 20km in high swell seas & rain conditions). Even if there is no organized national SAR available in the remote location you're in, this is how it still can work with your local dive operation:

    The PLB when activated uplinks to the COSPAS/SARSAT System as described above --your designated emergency contingency contact should be provided by you smartly beforehand, with at least cellphone calling numbers & information on the dive operation, resort or liveboard that you're using, and emergency contact numbers for the US Embassy in Indonesia. In other words, the Rescue Coordination Center in the United States and/or the US Embassy in Jakarta can still call your dive operation base station or resort, and relay vital GPS coordinates to your location as determined by the satellite system.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2017

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