Reg breathing wet

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halocline

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Its not common sense, it's a fear mongering sales-pitch that the dive gear industry uses to restrict access to parts, force needless service policy, and up-sell naive customers. Certainly not every shop does this, but I've definitely seen it and its encouraged by the manufacturers.

And to repeat awap's question, do you personally believe that you will die if your regulator fails while you're diving?
 

tfsails

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I'm not going to get into the competence (or in-) of the guy who serviced the OP's reg. I will state from my own experience on two fronts: first, the competent service tech will inhale on a reassembled second stage with his finger clamped over the inlet to see if he has a hard vacuum. If he doesn't, he has a leak, and he troubleshoots it until it's fixed. I've discovered numerous cracked housings, pinholes in diaphragms, missing or improperly-installed o-rings, poorly seated diaphragms, etc. It isn't a mistake unless it goes to the customer with a problem. Any service tech worth a hoot would not hesitate to dive with a reg he just serviced; if he did hesitate, I'd run from him!

The second front is a touch of physics: If you're upside down in the water with the exhaust valve at the top of the reg and you exhale in that position, there is no way water cannot get into the reg. It's simple--water is denser than air and the exhaust air is spread out thinly enough that some water has to get into the housing. It then flows by gravity down into the mouthpiece area where you inhale it. It's been that way with my reg for as long as I've owned it and mine is put together properly. A possible exception would be a reg with a side diaphragm/exhaust valve such as the Poseidons. Even with them, I bet if you looked to your left putting the diaphragm up water would leak in during exhalation. Just my 2¢ worth.
 

tstormdiver

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Its not common sense, it's a fear mongering sales-pitch that the dive gear industry uses to restrict access to parts, force needless service policy, and up-sell naive customers. Certainly not every shop does this, but I've definitely seen it and its encouraged by the manufacturers.

And to repeat awap's question, do you personally believe that you will die if your regulator fails while you're diving?


Yes, I KNOW I will die, if my regulator fails & I can not get to another working regulator or get to the surface within the time it would take for me to pass out or my body to asphyxiate. You would also. If not, I guess you are immortal. Whether it is your life support equipment, redundant life support equipment, or a buddy's life support equipment, it keeps you alive down there. Feel free to see how long you'll last underwater without it.

I've said my peace. Believe what you want, it's your right. I just hope it does not bite you in the rear end someday.
 
R

redacted

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Yes, I KNOW I will die, if my regulator fails & I can not get to another working regulator or get to the surface within the time it would take for me to pass out or my body to asphyxiate. You would also. If not, I guess you are immortal. Whether it is your life support equipment, redundant life support equipment, or a buddy's life support equipment, it keeps you alive down there. Feel free to see how long you'll last underwater without it.

I've said my peace. Believe what you want, it's your right. I just hope it does not bite you in the rear end someday.

That is why we (I and apparently you) plan for another working regulator or safe access to the surface which means that a regulator failure is more of an inconvenience and not a life threatening event. The sky is not falling.
 

cc.harley

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Had to chime in. Tstorm...You stated it yourself ...."IF 1-Your life support fails, 2- Redundant life support fails AND 3- a buddy's life support fails" all three things would have to happen for you to die. I agree with awap more of an inconvienience and Not life threatening unless panic is involved. Training negates panic and one calmly finds secondary air source and ends dive. I personally am a supporter of Don't fix it if it isn't Broken. If the reg wasn't "serviced" it wouldn't be leaking and this thread would cease to exist. See what servicing the reg,
when it worked just fine,:eyebrow: caused?????:D
 

j2s

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I agree w/Doubler, Tried so-called "authorized" dealers several times over the years....Always a disappointment....Now I do it myself or in the case of my Apeks/Aqualung reg's I send them to Apeks in the UK...Always a great job, do more than I ask...The xtra in shipping is well worth it to me......
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/peregrine/

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