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oxygen tank death

Discussion in 'Accidents and Incidents' started by abnfrog, Oct 11, 2019.

  1. abnfrog

    abnfrog Tech Instructor

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
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    ok fair enough , but hi pressure air and o2 is used by use so much I think we lose prespective on what we SHOULD be doing , that why I stay up on it as much as possible ..AND to impart that to my students doing vip and 02 cleaning / blender
     
  2. Peter69_56

    Peter69_56 Divemaster

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
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    Ever tried to unscrew a scuba tank valve with 10 BAR in it? The pressure lockes the thread, regardless of if it is loose when empty or not so I would think it would be near impossible to unscrew the valve past the point where it comes out. However some commercial tank valves have tapered thread, so I am wondering if it was faulty thread/damaged, and this with the taper of the thread has allowed the valve to blow out? Just a thought anyway.
     
  3. grf88

    grf88 Divemaster

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Markham, Ontario
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    The report stated that corrosion around the valve was a suspected cause. Quite possible that the corrosion allowed the cylinder to stay gas tight until disturbed by rough handling.
     
    Bob DBF likes this.
  4. TrimixToo

    TrimixToo Regular of the Pub

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: New York State
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    Thanks for posting the pic, Frank. I finally got around to making one. I went with Aluminum because I didn't have a handy diameter in SS, and I put a projection on the end to bottom out before the larger diameter contacts the sealing surface inside the valve.

    DIN Tool 1.jpg DIN Tool 2.jpg
     
  5. Wookie

    Wookie Secret Field Agent ScubaBoard Business Sponsor

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    I have not seen that type of collet on a lathe before, does it have a name?
     
  6. JohnnyC

    JohnnyC PADI Pro

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    Looks like a 5C collet chuck.
     
    Wookie likes this.
  7. TrimixToo

    TrimixToo Regular of the Pub

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
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    Technically, a 5C collet closer. I had a 5C chuck on the previous lathe. The closer is *much* faster to use.
     
  8. AfterDark

    AfterDark Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Rhode Island, USA
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    Underestimate the power of compressed gas at your own risk.

    tanks.png steel tank.jpg
     
    eleniel and tridacna like this.
  9. SoFlaDiver954

    SoFlaDiver954 Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Ft lauderdale, FL
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    Top picture, left two tanks. Are those the concave bottom euro steels or are those aluminum? Flat bottom (and apparent sidewall thickness on the middle tank) is saying aluminum but the failure looks like more what I expect from steel.
     
  10. AfterDark

    AfterDark Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Rhode Island, USA
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    I don't really know as no details came with the pictures. The 2 you mentioned look like flat bottom AL tanks, possibly the old Al alloy forget the number, that is no longer touched by a lot of LDS. As indicated by the rust the others are steel.

    Taking another look, the lone tank on the right, it looks like an air bank tank, a 400cuft tank note how long it is, must have been an exciting day when that ruptured!
     

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