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Over breathing your reg

Discussion in 'Near Misses and Lessons Learned' started by Marivan377, Apr 8, 2019.

  1. mac64

    mac64 Barracuda

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Ireland
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    I think what happened here is a lot more common than we think. The op hyperventilated in response to not been able to keep up with his buddies, hyperventilating results in a sudden drop in CO2 which causes a feeling of not been able to get an adequate breath. The bodies answer is to flee to the surface and mistakenly safety. There’s only one foolproof buddy, a bailout system. Lesson learned.
     
  2. johndiver999

    johndiver999 Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Gainesville FL
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    Maybe I'm a still a little slow since I don't know anything about rebreathers - so the CCR training is analogous to the OP's situation because it involves telling the diver to head for the surface if there is an unknown problem - rather than address it in situ?
     
  3. doctormike

    doctormike ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: New York City
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    The analogy is fix at depth vs. bailout, as opposed to the OC fix at depth vs surface. So it's an analogy.

    I think that you are making this into a straw man argument - maybe you are genuinely interested in my opinion, maybe you are just having fun, not sure. But the point is that no one, including me, is saying "if anyone ever has any sort of problem scuba diving, you run to the surface as fast as you can".

    I was pretty clear about the parameters of my recommendation. But to use your phrasing, then yes, I would say that if a new diver has a "unknown problem", they are better off surfacing. That doesn't mean losing a fin. That doesn't even mean losing a buddy. But a new diver who is hyperventilating, panicking, alone and breathing from a wet regulator should make a safe ascent. Or at least not feel that making a safe ascent is a poor option.
     
    rjack321, rongoodman and jgttrey like this.
  4. jgttrey

    jgttrey Barracuda

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Houston
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    In Mod 1, which is the first module of CCR training, you are taught, as a newbie to rebreathers, to get off the loop and bailout if there is any issue: When in doubt, bailout. That doesn't automatically result in surfacing, because once youre on bailout you may be able to work through the issue, but the idea is that a less experienced diver should not try to solve a problem, or even spend the time to diagnose it, while still breathing on a loop that is potentially compromised.

    In Mod 2/3, you learn to to use more judgment about when bailout is necessary and how to quickly diagnose and solve problems while staying on the loop, if possible. On dives with more deco or overheads, staying on the loop if you can is a good thing.
     
    RainPilot likes this.
  5. MinimalMayhem

    MinimalMayhem Angel Fish

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    I'm not sure you've been given good advice there. Maybe you know something I don't, but when I did my service tech training we discussed gas delivery and both (modern) through-piston and balanced diaphragms will dish out more gas than you can suck down safely without risk of CO2 retention (if properly tuned) at anything but depths where you should probably be using helium to reduce gas density.
     
    rjack321 and JackD342 like this.
  6. doctormike

    doctormike ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: New York City
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    Uh, just for the new divers, you can run out of gas just as easily with a piston reg as with a diaphragm reg. That's not what over-breathing means.

    lol.
     
  7. johndiver999

    johndiver999 Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Gainesville FL
    729
    620
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    I think we agree far more than disagree. I think my main idea was that all divers, when encountering a problem should first consider two options: go up or consider trying to devise a solution on the bottom. That is the first step in the decision tree.

    As you correctly indicated, the more experienced a diver is, the more likely he will be able formulate a solution at depth and implement it successfully.

    Tech divers and/or divers with an overhead or deco may completely loose the option of going straight up.

    So my suggestion is that (if possible) a recreational diver should be THINKING of staying and fixing and not going up. I won’t tell a diver NOT to go up or shame them for doing it in certain situations, because quite often it is the best solution and if you delay and don’t realize it soon enough, the viability of that option may expire.

    With respect to the op’s predicament, if he was thinking his reg was wet and leaking water, then he should immediately consider going to the octopus and I mean right away.

    If the problem is that the diver is out of breath than his first decision should be can I control my instinct to head up and simply rest and recover and worry about nothing else for 60 or 90 Seconds???? If the diver feels he can’t do that, then instinct is going to govern anyway and he will be compelled to go up right away.

    Regardless, the end result is that the diver is going to ascend, since he is alone and could be expected to follow lost buddy protocol.
     
    Marivan377 likes this.
  8. IncreaseMyT

    IncreaseMyT Banned

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Naples, FL
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    Were you laughing at yourself? A piston reg delivers more air than a diaphragm reg FACT. LOL
     
  9. doctormike

    doctormike ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: New York City
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    If you say so! :D
     
  10. Marivan377

    Marivan377 Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Delco pa
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    Just a little FYI for everyone this was my 7th dive. I’ve never had this issue on any other dives I have done.
     
    chillyinCanada and rjack321 like this.

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