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Jon_R

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Location
Palm Bay, Florida
# of dives
50 - 99
The dive was a pretty simple one. In Ft Lauderdale, FL. only about 25 feet salt water. Viz was about 35 feet. Was not a normal anchor the boat was tied off on a permanent buoy. Like I said new diver certified in May only have 14 dives so far (counting it by tank). A pretty easy one was a good start as I knew we would be on our own. Daughter and Girlfriend with me and they tossed me a flag and wished us luck. :) It could have been we where pretty close to the boat but with mostly looking down at the reef and animals we passed right past it.

I will work on it and thanks for all the information.
 

AfterDark

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Location
Rhode Island, USA
# of dives
1000 - 2499
Here in New England where vis is low we attach strobe lights to the anchor line helps on the return.
 

islanddream

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ScubaBoard Supporter
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Location
Hobe Sound, Florida
# of dives
500 - 999
I think writing information on your slate or wet notes is important. Things like anchor depth, noteworthy structures, compass reading, etc. I'm new to navigation and it doesn't come natural so I need some "cliff notes" to help me!
 

AfterDark

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Location
Rhode Island, USA
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aprivetera

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Location
New Jersey
# of dives
I just don't log dives
Compass and Kick Cycles! It is also easy to get disoriented when you have too much visibility, so always bring a compass even if you do not think you will need it!
 

tracydr

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Location
North Carolina, 3 miles from South Carolina
# of dives
500 - 999
Compass is so important. A good compass that doesn't needed to be perfectly level like the Suunto really makes life better.
I like using cheap chem lights like we used in the Army to mark entry/exits and tanks in poor vis.
 

AfterDark

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Location
Rhode Island, USA
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Compass and Kick Cycles! It is also easy to get disoriented when you have too much visibility, so always bring a compass even if you do not think you will need it!

Kick cycles are good if one doesn't get so distracted that the count is lost. I use pace beads when I know I'm going to be using kick cycles.

pace beads.jpg 9 beads.jpg 9 beads det.jpg 4beads  det.jpg 4 beads.jpg
Each of the lower beads represent 100 feet each of the upper beads represent 1000 feet. Every 100feet pull a small bead down after the ninth bead is pulled one upper bead is pulled. I know I went 1000 feet.
 

NAM001

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Location
the moon
# of dives
500 - 999
AS MINTIONED BY OTHERS I HAVE DESERT STAR sport and scout,,,, pluss a strobe for the line or reference point. although the use of them ,,,,both have thier problems, I know that no real diver would stoop to use of such crutches but a t times anything is better than nothing. strobes are so-so for lower vis shore dives and outstanding for anchor dives. the pingers are severly hampered when not used in open water such as boat dives. the confines of lakes or quarrys with echoing sides can render then useless. On a boat dive the pinger will get you to visual range of the strobe. Especially usefull when multiple downlines are present. Lets me enjoy the dive without having to be a dedicated navagator. for those who would not consider using a strobe, i would say that every boat night dive does this in one form or another when lights are dropped over the side. I have on more than one occasion done the recipricle course and missed becaue of poor technique or the unsenced presence of a current.
 

AfterDark

Contributor
Messages
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Location
Rhode Island, USA
# of dives
1000 - 2499
AS MINTIONED BY OTHERS I HAVE DESERT STAR sport and scout,,,, pluss a strobe for the line or reference point. although the use of them ,,,,both have thier problems, I know that no real diver would stoop to use of such crutches but a t times anything is better than nothing. strobes are so-so for lower vis shore dives and outstanding for anchor dives. the pingers are severly hampered when not used in open water such as boat dives. the confines of lakes or quarrys with echoing sides can render then useless. On a boat dive the pinger will get you to visual range of the strobe. Especially usefull when multiple downlines are present. Lets me enjoy the dive without having to be a dedicated navagator. for those who would not consider using a strobe, i would say that every boat night dive does this in one form or another when lights are dropped over the side. I have on more than one occasion done the recipricle course and missed becaue of poor technique or the unsenced presence of a current.

We use strobes here day or night routinely. We don't depend on them they are just another tool we use. The most useful tool is between our ears.
 
https://www.shearwater.com/products/peregrine/

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