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Mantus Marine dive compressor

Discussion in 'Compressors, Boosters & Blending Systems' started by 2airishuman, Apr 8, 2021.

  1. 2airishuman

    2airishuman ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Greater Minnesota
    2,577
    1,824
    Just found out that Texas-based Mantus Marine has entered the compressor business and now offers a marinized compressor that runs on 13A 120V for a free air delivery rate of approximately 1.2 cfm (extrapolating from manufacturer's claims). The compressor weighs 63 pounds including motor and filtration, and is priced at $2200. It is supposed to be quiet.

    Scuba Diving Compressor - Mantus Marine

    Details are sparse. Anyone seen one of these or have more info?
     
  2. iain/hsm

    iain/hsm Contributor

    786
    398
    HAHAHA very funny great find But your 8 days late for April 1st

    "The most practical portable compressor in the world".

    Brought to you from a company that also makes a "Waterproof Purse"
    • Water Proof, Rugged, Classy!
    • Designed for life on the water!
    • Fits all size phones
    A laugh a minute, looking for the young hapless, hopeless, and totally ignorant customers that abound in
    this scuba la la land of Padi profesionals that teach the clueless to the extent that this product is hopeless.
    It's junk. More than likely a failed attempt into the air gun market now looking for mugs in ours.
    Hope dies last.
     
  3. 2airishuman

    2airishuman ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Greater Minnesota
    2,577
    1,824
    Good to know that I can always count on you for posts of consistent quality and, how shall we say, unique point of view, on any compressor-related topic, Iain.
     
    rhwestfall likes this.
  4. rhwestfall

    rhwestfall Woof! ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: "La Grande Ile"
    16,553
    19,665
  5. rhwestfall

    rhwestfall Woof! ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: "La Grande Ile"
    16,553
    19,665
  6. rhwestfall

    rhwestfall Woof! ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: "La Grande Ile"
    16,553
    19,665
    I'm looking to see if they have a bridge for sale.....
     
  7. Akimbo

    Akimbo Just a diver Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    10,735
    9,028
    If I had to guess, I would say small sailboats might find it useful for emergency repairs. Space is precious, especially when loaded for long distance cruises. Jobs like replacing a prop, repair the rudder, or plugging a port to replace a seacock comes to mind.
     
    -JD- and 2airishuman like this.
  8. 2airishuman

    2airishuman ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Greater Minnesota
    2,577
    1,824
    Mantus is one of four highly regarded designers and manufacturers of SHHP (super high holding power) anchors and related ground tackle for oceangoing yachts, the others being Rocna (in Canada), Manson (in New Zealand), and Spade Anchor (In Florida). These manufacturers primarily serve a niche community of liveaboard cruisers who spend a substantial number of days at anchor each year on sailboats in the 30-60' range. Roughly half of these individuals are scuba divers. By virtue of living aboard a self-contained sailboat they have ready access to dive opportunities in otherwise inaccessible locations from their own vessel or from a dinghy. In most cases these aren't especially deep dives and indeed often they are areas that can be explored by snorkeling. These same sailors also dive to check the set of their anchor, to clean marine growth from the bottom of their boat, to deal with fouling from lines or traps, and (as @Akimbo notes upthread) to effect repairs.

    For clarity, these are individuals who have completed OWD certification or equivalent, at least in the vast majority of cases.

    Dive gear designed for shorter duration dives in shallow, warm water serves these needs well and offers an alternative to hookah systems (which are popular in this application). My boats are smaller but I have experimented with minimalist dive configurations using smaller cylinders and no BC and even though I have concluded that the space savings over a BP/W with a smaller wing aren't that great, I can see the attraction. There is a real need, and most people aren't aware of the BP/W alternative.

    Gas logistics is a major barrier to diving for this group. Obtaining gas fills ashore is usually untenable: the boat is ordinarily at anchor so cylinders have to be transferred to shore in a dinghy, then transported to a dive shop (with public transportation not always allowing dive cylinders depending on country), then back. Space aboard is limited as is power. A relative handful (I've heard 10%) of these boats have compressors, usually powered by a gasoline engine, and in many cases offer fills to other boats on a barter basis. There's more electricity on boats now than 5-10 years ago due to advancements in solar power and LiFePO4 battery technology, but electric-powered compressors are still rare.

    A compressor that runs off electricity, that is small and light enough for one person to move from a storage locker to an operating location on deck, and that is sized to run from smaller electrical systems that are 120v only, meets a genuine need for this small market. The usual questions about lifespan, parts availability, filtration design, maximum pressure, and service intervals all still apply.
     
    James79 and -JD- like this.
  9. rhwestfall

    rhwestfall Woof! ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: "La Grande Ile"
    16,553
    19,665
    I was impressed with their anchors (except a few of the links on the page are broken)....
     
  10. rsingler

    rsingler Scuba Instructor, Tinkerer in Brass Staff Member ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Napa, California
    5,396
    6,856
    That was exactly how I started diving. Got my cert, bought a gas powered Rix 3, hung my intake up the mast and checked my anchor set all over the Hawaiian islands. Didn't die, but rusted a few steel tanks with poor separator drainage technique. Fixed that when I got home.
    Nice to see there are still dreamers out there...
     
    rob.mwpropane likes this.

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