Ice diving course?

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Ulfhedinn

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This is on my bucket list so watching this thread. I plan on taking a class. Cave cert or not as I'm guessing there are some "easy" ways to mess this up and die.
 

Rol diy

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Just how would you run a lost line drill in the middle of a lake?

John chatterton has a really good article on a BFK. Stick that into the mud, sand, tie off your second spool. And do your search pattern...
Personally I like to dive and have something to see. So it would be rare for me to dive in the middle of a mud lake.
Also I ice dive in area that I know well before hand.
As stated before I could fine my way out without a line if I was dumb enough to do so. Or if the dive went all to pieces, and could not find a broken or lost line.


Quote
I am a bit curious about your statement.

I can see only one similarity: the physical overhead ceiling.

However, the following things are crucial in cave diving, and I do not think they are so relevant in ice diving:
1) No visibility exit (this is probably important in ice diving, but I bet the procedures are different)

It would not be uncommon to not see the exit hole.

2) Navigation with cookies and arrows

Sure use them if you want. But I am laying my own line...
where no other lines are... don't see the point.

3) Decompression with sawtooth profiles

Do not do that. Not sure how that is done in open water...

4) Broken line procedures

Tie off with a spool and search for line....

On the other hand, I can think of many things critical in ice diving but not in caves (thermal protection)

Orda caves in Russia..
There are othe European caves the the cold is a huge problem...
They often use electric heated underwear..

navigation

Continuous guide line to the surface.
Compass... and know how to use it.

and emergency procedures are probably very different)

Hmmm. Not really. Underwater problems need to be fixed underwater...

Am I wrong? If not, better take a course before going there.

Yes please take a course...
Sounds like you need it.

Recommend reading....
 

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lowviz

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This is on my bucket list so watching this thread. I plan on taking a class.
Excellent!

Correct, nothing at all like cave except for the overhead. I'll offer a few things that will keep your ice experience from becoming either miserable or far less than your expectations:

There is a lot of front work involved so some instructors end up becoming very cold and tired just as they are finally set up. Their agenda may then become dunk, repeat, get off the ice, and distribute brag cards. For some students, this is just fine.

For your first experience, it is most likely that you will find all your fun just below the surface. Your air lasts forever at 1 ffw. Ice is often highly textured on its underside. Slow and easy, losing a mask is not recommended. Chill and enjoy the underside! :wink:

Your line tender is an important part of your fun. Your final dive of the course tends to be at your discretion, let your tender know what you are going to do. The only communication is by line pulls. Everybody seems to have a slightly different code.

Make it clear from the onset that you aren't even going to splash if another diver will be on your line at the same time. One student per line! One tender per student!

Gloves. Super important. I have a pair that allows water to circulate freely and one that is so tight at the wrists that the warm water stays in the gloves. Obviously, dry-gloves are a good solution but you don't need them.

Your tether line will be polypropylene so that it stays off the bottom. The bottom should be undisturbed and great viz. Fun to spot the critters...

Slow and easy. Some students just want the card and others get into the uniqueness of this type of diving. Either way, no judgment, SLOW AND EASY. Listen to your instructor and tender. Have fun.
 

Subcooled

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Question.

Are you trained to ice dive and have you ever been under the ice? Ice diving isn't some super macho thing, it is just another branch of diving. For me, it is stupidly fun when done correctly.

His reply seems to indicate actual experience
 

Subcooled

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I have a bit of overhead experience (Bonne Terre mine) but nothing compared to what I'd expect with ice.

Situations do differ, but I have experienced that under ice all directions are the same. No matter where you look, it looks exactly the same. There is a high risk of getting lost! In a cave you at least have a tunnel or something like that. Under ice you have absolutely nothing. Hopefully you will have a line tender. There will be a ray of light visible at the hole in the ice, though. But can you see it from distance?

Breathing makes your 2nd stage cool and as you exhalation is moist, ice crystals will form. A free flow will result. It is perfecty normal and boring, so do not panic!
 

Subcooled

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I think the temperature of the water might be different.

A cave can be a maze. Under ice there is no maze. There are indefinitely many equally good opportunities.

Water is cold of course. A diving suit solves that!
 

Marie13

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Difference between ice & cave I told people who were freaked out about me ice diving this winter:

With ice diving, the lines we used were 100ft long. You’ll be much closer to the exist. When cave diving, you’re going to be much further from the exit.

Everyone said that didn’t make them feel any better. :D
 

Tracy

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YES LOOKS AN ICE DIVE PROGRAM IS IN THE WORKS !!!!!LATE MARCH (asUSUAL) our facility is taylor made for the course and as always accommodation is free
What facility is this?
 

Rol diy

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Breathig makes your 2nd stage cool and as you exhalation is moist, ice crystals will form. A free flow will result. It is perfecty normal and boring, so do not panic!

Yes that's correct... switch reg, shut down post. And let frozen reg thaw, check reg,
(That happens in 48*f water at 110 ft as well)



A cave can be a maze. Under ice there is no maze. There are indefinitely many equally good opportunities.

Water is cold of course. A diving suit solves that!

One year the water level was lowered. And ice froze around the pilings. Then the water level was back to normal. And everything froze again... there was literally ice above and below us in the pilings at one section. About 2ft slot.
Was quite cool. In more ways than one.:wink:
 
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