I know this camera can do better ... advice?

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Blackcrusader

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Hopefully you can see this photo I took today with my TG5 with an Inon strobe. Shows what the camera is capable of. A sea dragon head:

No as close up but the camera gives me photos could never get with my go pro.

A SEA HORSE HEAD.JPG
 
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Kimela

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Firstly you rush to shoot so the camera is not focused, in your rush you create movement which may also scare off what you want to film. You do not wait for the green square or learn to lock in the focal distance on the TG6.

Yes, this is true. Our go-to dive destination is Cozumel, and sometimes I have the luxury of no current, and sometimes I'm fighting a mild current, and sometimes it's pretty stiff. Regardless, my light will scare the critters - I've experimented with it - blennies tuck back in their holes (no always though) and seahorses turn away from it. So I rush, don't take the time to focus and hope for the best. I've never experimented with a tripod or setting down my camera.

I've had people pull on me thinking unresponsive diver no bubble trail no movement the diver died oh my god he was only taking a photo.

That's pretty darned funny! I have rarely had the opportunity to take that much time to set up a shot. Usually I'm with a group and have to keep up.

That's when my arms become like a humming bird head and they stay in a fixed position while the rest of me moves with the rocking motion of the water.

I learned how to do that when diving in Kona - before then, I tried to fight the motion of the water. It really does work best when you allow the water to move just the parts of your body that don't 'need' to stay still. Not that I have this perfected, but I understand the value, and work on the skill.

If something is on a reef wall you may want to get into that vertical position. Buoyancy control, fins controlling your direction and stillness of hands you will learn with time. The water is my magic carpet ride so move and flow with the water.

(I'm hearing Steppenwolf AND seeing the scene from Aladdin here with the 'magic carpet ride'!). I spend a fair amount of time upside down when trying to get shots on a slope/wall. It's the only way to protect the reef, and get close enough to get a shot. One of the reasons I want to keep my rig smallish is to get into tight spaces. I hate having to pass up good shots because my rig is too big (but a GoPro wouldn't do what I want to do - I really like macro).

Here are a couple of my better pics - when my subject is stationary (flamingo tongue) it helps!! But not matter what I do, my painted elysia are always just a little blurry - it seems the colors bleed into one another just the tiniest amount.
2B55C909-061B-4D2C-AFDD-99DCD32FFB0A_1_201_a.jpeg
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592A921A-456F-47B0-B2B8-7909503DB4ED_1_201_a.jpeg
DE8A8DC6-DCB0-457A-9030-6754C7663690_1_201_a.jpeg
5D4C2D09-1453-491A-8863-47DE91F1477B_1_201_a.jpeg
 
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Kimela

Kimela

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Hopefully you can see this photo I took today with my TG5 with an Inon strobe. Shows what the camera is capable of. A sea dragon head:

Beautiful! I'm trying to choose between the backscatter and Inon. Which Inon do you have?

Just an aside: As I sink more money into this hobby I love so much, it occurs to me that our dive community is the only place anyone will really appreciate the pictures we're taking. I can show a friend a pic of something the size of a grain of rice and they don't know it's that small until I point out the particles of sand. Because the critter is blown up they think it's the same size as a shark/ray/grunt/whatever. This truly is something I have to justify as doing only for myself - and be ok with that. Nobody's buying my photos. This is just for me (and my dive buddy/hubby). So it can be difficult to justify more $$$.
 

tursiops

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Yes, this is true. Our go-to dive destination is Cozumel, and sometimes I have the luxury of no current, and sometimes I'm fighting a mild current, and sometimes it's pretty stiff. Regardless, my light will scare the critters - I've experimented with it - blennies tuck back in their holes (no always though) and seahorses turn away from it. So I rush, don't take the time to focus and hope for the best. I've never experimented with a tripod or setting down my camera.



That's pretty darned funny! I have rarely had the opportunity to take that much time to set up a shot. Usually I'm with a group and have to keep up.



I learned how to do that when diving in Kona - before then, I tried to fight the motion of the water. It really does work best when you allow the water to move just the parts of your body that don't 'need' to stay still. Not that I have this perfected, but I understand the value, and work on the skill.



(I'm hearing Steppenwolf AND seeing the scene from Aladdin here with the 'magic carpet ride'!). I spend a fair amount of time upside down when trying to get shots on a slope/wall. It's the only way to protect the reef, and get close enough to get a shot. One of the reasons I want to keep my rig smallish is to get into tight spaces. I hate having to pass up good shots because my rig is too big (but a GoPro wouldn't do what I want to do - I really like macro).

Here are a couple of my better pics - when my subject is stationary (flamingo tongue) it helps!! But not matter what I do, my painted elysia are always just a little blurry - it seems the colors bleed into one another just the tiniest amount.
View attachment 634014 .

View attachment 634009 View attachment 634010 View attachment 634011
Not quite in focus, and perhaps a bit of camera motion.
For the focus, try and compose your shot so the subject is all at the same distance from your lens. That is, if the nudi is at an angle, only part of it can be in focus, the rest will be blurry. Use the smallest focus spot your camera allows, and put it right on the eyes or rhinophores; that is, ensure the focus of the most critical feature(s).
For the camera motion, a strobe will REALLY help. With a vidao light, press the shutter slowly; a fast press will jerk/move the camera.
 
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Kimela

Kimela

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Use the smallest focus spot your camera allows

Do you know how I can determine what that is? WAIT: HOLD THE PRESS! I typed that and then grabbed my camera, put it on 'underwater' mode and macro, then half-pressed the shutter when I had an item to actually focus on and the GREEN BOX appeared! Then I tried to focus on my mouse pad (all black) and NO BOX! Please don't give me TOO much grief about not knowing what the green box is. I saw people referring to it in this thread and thought my camera didn't have it!!!!! Doh! Now I'm 'assuming' this is the 'smallest focus spot' my camera allows? (No, I haven't taken any classes - why do you ask?! Duh!). :dork2:

Final excuse ... like most people my age, I have to use readers. I did get my masked updated with my new script for near and far vision, but it's still not optimal. I wish I could take a pair of readers down there with me! :shocked:
 

tursiops

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Do you know how I can determine what that is? WAIT: HOLD THE PRESS! I typed that and then grabbed my camera, put it on 'underwater' mode and macro, then half-pressed the shutter when I had an item to actually focus on and the GREEN BOX appeared! Then I tried to focus on my mouse pad (all black) and NO BOX! Please don't give me TOO much grief about not knowing what the green box is. I saw people referring to it in this thread and thought my camera didn't have it!!!!! Doh! Now I'm 'assuming' this is the 'smallest focus spot' my camera allows? (No, I haven't taken any classes - why do you ask?! Duh!). :dork2:

Final excuse ... like most people my age, I have to use readers. I did get my masked updated with my new script for near and far vision, but it's still not optimal. I wish I could take a pair of readers down there with me! :shocked:
The green box is essential. It needs lines to focus on...the camera tries to make the lines sharp. Some nudis, for example, have a mottled pattern that appears out-of-focus...and indeed it is hard to focus on. Rule of thumb: focus on the esys for a fish, the rhinophores for a nudi. For the little blennies, try and get an angle so the mouth and teeth are the same distance from the lens as the eyes...then all three will be sharp.
 

JBreezy

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I've only had my TG-6 for 1 trip and am not an experienced photographer, so someone please correct me if I am wrong.

Green box from a half press is your auto-focus, which as mentioned above, is essential, especially when in super macro, IME.

Another thought, if you are not able to maintain position long, is to try the sequence (burst) shots that can be achieved through a setting and then holding down the shutter button. Maybe not the most elegant solution, and you'll wind up with a ton of shots to delete, but may be useful when it's not possible for you or subject to remain stationary.
 

hilljo88

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Your better pics look great!

A strobe will help a lot in freezing the action. A snoot focuses the light on your subject, but because of that very narrow beam, can be frustrating to locate. One of its features is to give a black background, but that can be obtained by careful composing and in post.

Be careful not to compare your results to those you see from pros. Those images can be the end result of hundreds, even thousands of shots taken with very expensive gear and expertly processed in Photoshop.
 
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Kimela

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For the little blennies, try and get an angle so the mouth and teeth are the same distance from the lens as the eyes...then all three will be sharp.

I have experienced this issue of 'which part to focus on' or 'only one part turned out really focused - and it wasn't the part I wanted to focus on'. This makes sense. Thanks - I need to get back in the water to practice.
 
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Kimela

Kimela

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Another thought, if you are not able to maintain position long, is to try the sequence (burst) shots that can be achieved through a setting and then holding down the shutter button.

That was one of the suggestions in the video I watched on backscatter - and I did set that up. Choosing the most focused out of several will be fun!
 
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